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Thread: Roe v. Wade (49) to be execuited by Supreme Court

  1. #26
    Moderator puzzld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    and birth control is the #1 way to eliminate the need for abortion, but they will come for that next. Amy has already said that she thinks the birth control privacy case was faulty and shouldn't be upheld.
    Birth control, sex ed, and poverty reduction. But oh no, we can't even insist that people have access to bc and heaven knows we don't want to explain sex to the kids. WTH
    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    lol at Nestle being some vicious smiter, she's the nicest person on this site besides probably puzzld. Or at least the last person to resort to smiting.
    Quote Originally Posted by nestlequikie View Post
    Why on earth would I smite you when I can ban you?

  2. #27
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    I've been volleying between crying and being furious all day. I'm absolutely disgusted at the SC and the damage they let Trump do. The supreme court isn't even supposed to get political, yet here they are making political decisions for the the majority when the majority doesn't agree with it. Literally just taking control of women's bodies.

    I didn't agree with expanding the court before, but now that they've shown their cards and lied and are acting like dictators, FUCK YES. EXPAND THAT MOTHERFUCKER NOW AND STACK IT WITH LIBERAL JUDGES.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    That is too pretty to be shoved up an ass.

  3. #28
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.cnn.com/2022/05/03/opini...vic/index.html

    Opinion: Conservatives aren't going to stop with abortion, and this draft opinion proves it

    On Monday night, Politico published a leaked draft opinion from the Supreme Court on a crucial abortion case, which, if formally adopted, would overturn Roe v. Wade. It is a devastating document to read, indicating a slim majority of the justices -- four of the five appointed by presidents who lost the popular vote -- are set to end the era of legal abortion in the United States.

    The final opinion is still to come, and of course justices can change their votes and their phrasing before opinions are formally released. But even though many Supreme Court observers, myself included, predicted this would be the outcome, it is still a crushing blow to read in black and white. And it is devastating to consider the consequences yet to come.

    For American women, it throws the future into question: What will it mean to live in a country that has made it clear it doesn't see you as an equal citizen -- that doesn't recognize the most basic, intimate right to decide what happens inside your own body?

    For one, it likely means more women will die of pregnancy-related causes. One researcher estimates an abortion ban means maternal mortality rates could tick up by as much as 21%.

    It likely means women imprisoned for suspected abortions. It almost surely means women killed or injured from attempts at self-induced abortions. And an end to legal abortion means, obviously, more women forced to carry pregnancies they did not want and some of those women having to raise children they cannot afford or were not prepared to have.

    It affects the individuals forced to continue pregnancies, endure childbirth and either raise children or make the often difficult (and, since Roe, increasingly rare) choice to place them up for adoption. But restrictive abortion laws affect all of us, pregnant or not. They feed into a culture of misogyny, one in which all women are denied the most basic rights of bodily autonomy and self-determination, and are treated primarily as vessels for childbearing, not autonomous human beings.

    More forced childbearing, particularly in a country with so little help for mothers -- no federally-mandated paid parental leave, no universal child care, insufficient protections against workplace discrimination -- means many, many women forced out of the paid workforce, giving up their dreams and poorer for the rest of their lives. And it impacts everyone: Their children and families, but also the population more broadly.

    A country in which more women are forced out of the public, political and economic spheres is a country in which men dominate those spheres, to the detriment of all women and equality more broadly. It is a country that loses out, where untold numbers of women simply never reach their potential: Never create their art, never invent the new technology, never make the new discovery, never write their book or run for office or claw their way out of poverty or leave an abusive man.

    A country that forces women into pregnancy and off of their self-determined paths is a country that is poorer by all measures.

    And the conservative movement won't stop there.

    Roe is not a case that stands alone. The legal theory that led to Roe v. Wade was used earlier in Griswold v. Connecticut, which legalized contraception for married couples, and was quickly followed by cases that opened up legal contraception access to all American adults.

    Already, anti-abortion groups and activists have made clear they believe many forms of contraception, from the IUD to the birth control pill, are tantamount to abortion. Many large networks of anti-abortion "crisis pregnancy centers," which largely exist to talk women out of abortion and virtually none of which even provide basic prenatal care, formally bar their centers from giving women contraception. Abortion opponents have taken cases all the way to the Supreme Court (and won) on their false claims that the IUD is a form of abortion.

    Make no mistake: These groups are coming for contraception, too.

    And it seems unlikely to end there. The line of cases following the Griswold contraception case and Roe includes cases that ended criminal penalties for consensual same-sex intercourse and legalized same-sex marriage. The draft opinion to overturn Roe, penned by Justice Samuel Alito, hints at how this conservative court will address recent Supreme Court decisions on LGBTQ rights, dismissing their "appeals to a broader right to autonomy."

    It was never just about abortion. It's about the broader and much more radical cultural shift the reactionary American right wants: A return to traditional gender roles, with men occupying the public, economic and political spheres; women dependent on men and at home with children; and LGBTQ people pushed back into the shadows.

    Abortion rights advocates have long been working to make sure women can have abortions even in places where access is limited or abortion is largely outlawed. An end to Roe will mean their work will scale up. But some women -- perhaps most women -- will not be able to get the safe abortions they need. And in a country where abortion is outlawed, all women ending pregnancies are treated like criminals and told they should feel ashamed.

    This Supreme Court opinion is only a draft, and it is not yet binding. According to Politico, the draft -- authored by Justice Samuel Alito -- was circulated in early February.
    Abortion remains legal in most of the United States. But it seems that window is closing.

    Now is the time to speak out and show those in power just how massive an earthquake they will cause if abortion is outlawed. And if you've been passive on this issue perhaps because you don't think you'll ever need an abortion, now is the time to pay attention and get in the fight.

    Because when one in four women has an abortion in her lifetime, someone you love will need one. And because we are all worse off in a country that does not allow women to chart our own paths, control our own bodies, and walk toward our best futures.

  4. #29
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Basically everything I posted yesterday and it's true. You can add interracial marriages to that list of what they'll abolish and the Southern States are licking their chops for that one already.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    That is too pretty to be shoved up an ass.

  5. #30
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Babe 73 View Post
    Basically everything I posted yesterday and it's true. You can add interracial marriages to that list of what they'll abolish and the Southern States are licking their chops for that one already.
    Stanley vs Georgia also gave people the right to have porn under the umbrella of the "right to privacy". I love how that's not being brought up, because they know that their base of redneck men would freak the fuck out if they thought that was going to be taken from them.

    Also, I was a little surprised about Fl in this map. Rest assured that DeSantis will get right on that!


  6. #31
    Moderator puzzld's Avatar
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    And don't forget, there are those who are hoping to get a federal law prohibiting abortion, so don't think you're in the clear, just because your state hasn't shut it's clinics down...
    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    lol at Nestle being some vicious smiter, she's the nicest person on this site besides probably puzzld. Or at least the last person to resort to smiting.
    Quote Originally Posted by nestlequikie View Post
    Why on earth would I smite you when I can ban you?

  7. #32
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by puzzld View Post
    And don't forget, there are those who are hoping to get a federal law prohibiting abortion, so don't think you're in the clear, just because your state hasn't shut it's clinics down...
    It'll be like Marijuana. It's legal in certain States and the federal government will collect taxes, but it's technically still federally illegal so the feds could come in and shut down all of that if they wanted to. It's just in this case, they're making money from it so they leave it alone. If the motivation turns to taking control of people's bodies, they'll do it. Rest assured.

    As it is, here in CA weed sales are required to be cash only because none of the banks will do business with them since it's federally illegal.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    That is too pretty to be shoved up an ass.

  8. #33
    Scoopski Potatoes Nic B's Avatar
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    A lot of people talk shit about our governor, but it makes me happy he is fighting for us!

    Gov. Gavin Newsom on Wednesday said he was outraged that the Supreme Court appeared poised to overturn the right to abortion and predicted the decision could lead to future efforts to strike down gay marriage.

    Newsom spoke at an event in Los Angeles with members of Planned Parenthood and called for people to ?wake up? in the wake of what he called a ?remarkable moment? in American history.

    ?At a time when countries around the world are expanding liberties, are expanding rights, here we are in the United States of America about to roll back rights,? he said.

    Newsom argued that a weakened right to privacy would affect other protections, saying ?don?t think for a second this is where they stop.?

    ?You think for a second same-sex marriage is safe in the United States of America?? Newsom said. ?Give me a break.?

    President Joe Biden and other Democrats, along with some legal scholars, have also argued that same-sex marriage could be threatened by a weakened right to privacy if the court overturns Roe V. Wade.

    They have cited language in the leaked Supreme Court document authored by Justice Samuel Alito on whether rights are ?deeply rooted? in United States history and say that this could lead to other breaks from precedent, Reuters reported.

    Alito, for his part, also writes that "nothing in this opinion should be understood to cast doubt on precedents that do not concern abortion."

    The Supreme Court?s public affairs office has said that the draft opinion does not represent a decision by the court or the final position on the case.

    Newsom referred to comments by Republican Sen. Mike Braun, of Indiana, that appeared to suggest he believed interracial marriage should be left up to the states. Braun, however, later said he had misunderstood the question he was asked.

    ?Pay attention America, they?re coming after you next,? Newsom said. ?Watch this space. If privacy is not constitutionally protected, this opens up a panoply of issues.?

    | RELATED | More than a dozen states have passed bans designed to go into effect if Roe v. Wade is overturned

    Newsom went on to talk about plans with Democratic state lawmakers to add an amendment to the California constitution that would make abortion a protected right.

    ?We will not be defeated,? Newsom said. ?We will affirm the currently constitutionally protected rights of women, girls, their reproductive rights and freedoms in California.?
    https://www.kcra.com/article/wake-up...court/39909615


    Quote Originally Posted by marakisses View Post
    yes i said i will leave it under you storage he said cuddle with me i said shut up it over??? what am i doing wrong??
    Quote Originally Posted by curiouscat View Post
    Happy Birthday! I hid a dead body in your backyard to celebrate. Good luck finding it under the cement. You can only use a stick to look for it.

  9. #34
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    And there it is..... "Misunderstood the question".... Riiiiiight.

    Newsom referred to comments by Republican Sen. Mike Braun, of Indiana, that appeared to suggest he believed interracial marriage should be left up to the states. Braun, however, later said he had misunderstood the question he was asked.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    That is too pretty to be shoved up an ass.

  10. #35
    Senior Member Bewitchingstorm's Avatar
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    Here is the full opinion. Politico highlighted key points in the opinion so you don't have to read the entire document.

    https://www.politico.com/news/2022/0...inion-00029473

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  12. #37
    Senior Member Bewitchingstorm's Avatar
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    Here is a pro-choice group who has published the addresses of all the justices who support the opinion. They also have rallies planned starting this Sunday.

    https://www.ruthsent.us/

  13. #38
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.nbcnews.com/health/healt...care-rcna27349

    “It’s not just about abortion:” Overturning Roe could affect miscarriage care

    Anti-abortion legislation can have unintended medical consequences that extend beyond women seeking to terminate a pregnancy — particularly in the management of a miscarriage, experts say.

    On Monday, a leaked draft Supreme Court opinion published by Politico revealed that the high court intends to overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that guarantees abortion access.

    Up to one in four pregnancies end in miscarriage, according to some estimates, a loss that can be traumatic and dangerous for women. The risk is even higher after age 40. But the medical care a woman needs when she’s had a miscarriage can mirror how an abortion is performed, experts say.

    “Medically, miscarriage and abortions are treated in very similar way,” said Dr. Stephanie Mischell, a family medicine physician in Texas and fellow with Physicians for Reproductive Health.

    That means that laws that restrict abortion or that outlaw certain medications or procedures used in abortion, also have the potential to limit treatment for miscarriage.

    “There is this false assumption that abortions can be regulated and restricted and criminalized without impacting women’s health care more broadly,” said Yvonne Lindgren, an associate professor of law at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, who specializes in reproductive rights.

    Inga, 62, of Ann Arbor, Michigan, still feels the trauma of her miscarriage from nearly 30 years ago. (She requested her last name not be used due to the stigma around miscarriage.)

    She was 13 weeks pregnant with her third child.

    Extremely heavy bleeding led to a drop in her blood pressure, and her husband rushed her to the emergency room of a Catholic hospital in the state.

    “I was crashing,” Inga said. “I thought, ‘This could kill me.’”

    At the hospital, doctors confirmed she was having a miscarriage. After staunching the bleeding, an obstetrician wanted to perform a procedure called a dilation and curettage — commonly referred to as a D&C — to remove the tissue from the uterus. Not doing so could lead to sepsis or other serious complications, sometimes within hours.

    But the hospital, which was subject to religious doctrine, wouldn’t allow it due to strict anti-abortion policies. That’s because a D&C is also the procedure used during a surgical abortion.

    Inga went home for three days. During that time, her body attempted to pass the tissue that remained in her uterus. She recalls the pain as constant and unbearable.

    Finally, she got the green light to get the procedure, but only if she would first undergo an ultrasound to make sure there was no heartbeat.

    ‘A very challenging environment’

    Stories of hospitals denying miscarriage care for religious reasons may foreshadow how women’s reproductive health care could be unintentionally impacted by anti-abortion legislation at the state and federal level, Lindgren said.

    “In these cases, doctors were faced with ethics committee investigations,” she said, referring to cases at hospitals that follow religious mandates. “Now we’re taking this to a whole new level with risk of criminalization.”

    A miscarriage is considered to be a pregnancy loss that occurs before 20 weeks of pregnancy, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A loss that occurs at 20 weeks or later is referred to as stillbirth.

  14. #39
    Moderator puzzld's Avatar
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    Yep. My Mom had a D&C when I was 12 or so. I've always suspected it was ... well something else. But abortion wasn't legal at the time and her doctor was progressive. A real advocate for women's autonomy.
    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    lol at Nestle being some vicious smiter, she's the nicest person on this site besides probably puzzld. Or at least the last person to resort to smiting.
    Quote Originally Posted by nestlequikie View Post
    Why on earth would I smite you when I can ban you?

  15. #40
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by puzzld View Post
    Yep. My Mom had a D&C when I was 12 or so. I've always suspected it was ... well something else. But abortion wasn't legal at the time and her doctor was progressive. A real advocate for women's autonomy.
    Thank goodness for doctors like this!

  16. #41
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    I had both an abortion and a D&C because of a miscarriage. Looking back, the miscarriage was a blessing since in both cases they were abusive relationships that I would have never escaped.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    That is too pretty to be shoved up an ass.

  17. #42
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://thehill.com/opinion/healthca...ealth-neutral/

    Missing from Roe debate: Pregnancy is not health-neutral

    The Supreme Court opinion leak and comments made in oral arguments on Dobbs v. Jackson Women?s Health make it clear to me as a practicing OB-GYN that the justices don?t understand one huge medical fact: Pregnancy is not a health-neutral event.

    When debating whether pregnant people have a right to decide what is best for them and their body, it seems that society (and the justices) mistakenly refers to the alternative to abortion as adoption. This is not accurate. Adoption is an alternative to parenting.

    The only alternative to abortion is continuing the pregnancy, which carries immediate and long-term health effects.

    Pregnancy remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, and is much higher here than in other developed nations. Black pregnant people are 2.5 times more likely to have perinatal death than their white counterparts. OB-GYNs sometimes say ?an uncomplicated pregnancy is a diagnosis only made in hindsight? as even low-risk, healthy individuals may have any number of complications specific to pregnancy and birth such preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, hemorrhage, preterm birth, blood clots, serious depression and more. Common experiences in pregnancy translate to long-term health outcomes. For example, about one-third of all births in the United States happen by C-section, which is a major abdominal surgery. Preeclampsia and hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are common and associated with cardiovascular disease and a five times higher risk of high blood pressure.

    In contrast to pregnancy, abortion is safe: The risk of death with continued pregnancy and birth is 14 times higher than induced abortion. Medical complications associated with termination of pregnancy are overwhelmingly mild and lower than those reported with common dental procedures like wisdom teeth removal.

    This dichotomy between the safety of pregnancy and abortion was shown in ?The Turnaway Study,? a longitudinal study from researchers at the University of California San Francisco. They collected data from abortion facilities nationwide comparing outcomes for people who accessed abortion and those who could not. Compared to those who terminated their pregnancies, those who continued pregnancy were more likely to experience perinatal death and serious pregnancy complications. They also were more likely to remain in relationships with intimate partner violence, a risk to themselves and their children.

    It?s notable that multiple studies show that states with the most restrictive abortion laws also have the highest pregnancy morbidity and mortality as well as infant mortality. A 2021 study projected a that a total abortion ban would cause a 7 percent increase in pregnancy-related death the first year and 21 percent increase the second year, with a 33 percent increase for non-Hispanic Black people.

    Laws that restrict access to abortion ?including mandatory waiting periods, targeted regulation of abortion providers and requirements of abortion-providing clinicians ? delay access to care that increases the rates of complications, although abortion-related complications are generally rare and rarely serious. This increases the cost of abortion care, which disproportionately impacts poor Americans. The Hyde Amendment, implemented four years after the court?s Roe decision, bans the use of federal funds for abortions, and only a minority of states use their own funds to cover abortion services for Medicaid recipients. This leaves millions of disproportionately low-income people and people of color ? who already have higher rates of unintended pregnancy and pregnancy-related morbidity and mortality ? to shoulder an even higher, often inaccessible cost, than those with private insurance.

    Economically, pregnancy and birth are a sacrifice for American families. The United States has no mandatory paid sick time for employees. This means my patients often take unpaid time to attend prenatal care and manage the common symptoms of pregnancy including nausea and vomiting, fatigue, extreme physical discomforts, which are all ?normal? parts of a healthy pregnancy, not to mention the common medical complications. There is no paid parental leave policy in the United States, and only 10 states have a paid family leave program. One in four American women return to work two weeks after birth as a result. As an OB-GYN who has given birth, let me clarify this is absolutely not enough time to recover from the medical event of birth and the postpartum period.

    Abortion restrictions disproportionately impact the most vulnerable American families. Those who try to access abortion but cannot are four times more likely to live below the federal poverty level and experience long lasting financial struggles than those who successfully receive abortion care. As noted above, Black individuals have the highest maternal morbidity and mortality in pregnancy and stand to see this disparity increase if abortion is inaccessible.

    Pregnancy increases the risk of mental health conditions. Perinatal depression and anxiety affect approximately one in seven pregnant people. Rates of postpartum mental health disorders have doubled during the pandemic. The myth that women may experience mental health difficulty following an abortion isn?t accurate, multiple studies show that 95 percent of those who access termination of pregnancy still believe it was the right choice several years later.

    As an OB-GYN, I take care of families experiencing both the joys as well as the tragedies of pregnancy and birth every day. Every person deserves to decide whether to undergo pregnancy and birth, with all its medical, economic and psychological consequences. The Supreme Court, our state legislatures and Congress need to affirm the inherent right of individuals to make choices about their bodies and medical care. Abortion is essential health care. It is preventative health care.

    Marta Perez, MD, is a board-certified OB-GYN practicing in St. Louis, MO, with a focus on obstetrics. She is an incoming Maternal Fetal Medicine fellow, specializing in medically complex pregnancies and fetal conditions. Perez is a fellow of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. She is a board member of Renewing Dignity, a nonprofit dedicated to ending local period poverty in Jacksonville, Florida.

  18. #43
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/...splay-84574494

    After leak, religious rift over legal abortion on display

    America?s faithful are bracing ? some with cautionary joy and others with looming dread ? for the Supreme Court to potentially overturn the landmark 1973 Roe v. Wade decision and end the nationwide right to legal abortion.

    A reversal of the 49-year-old ruling has never felt more possible since a draft opinion suggesting justices may do so was leaked this week. While religious believers at the heart of the decades-old fight over abortion are shocked at the breach of high court protocol, they are still as deeply divided and their beliefs on the contentious issue as entrenched as ever.

    National polls show that most Americans support abortion access. A Public Religion Research Institute survey from March found that a majority of religious groups believe it should be legal in most cases ? with the exception of white evangelical Protestants, 69% of whom said the procedure should be outlawed in most or all cases.

    In conservative Christian corners, the draft opinion has sparked hope. Faith groups that have historically taken a strong anti-abortion stance, including the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, have urged followers to pray for Roe's reversal.

    The Rev. Manuel Rodriguez, pastor of the 17,000-strong Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic church in New York City's Queens borough, said his mostly Latino congregation is heartened by the prospect of Roe's demise at a time when courts in some Latin American countries such as Colombia and Argentina have moved to legalize abortion.

    ?You don?t fix a crime committing another crime,? Rodriguez said.

    Bishop Garland R. Hunt Sr., senior pastor of The Father?s House, a nondenominational, predominantly African American church in Peachtree Corners, Georgia, agreed.

    ?This is the result of ongoing, necessary prayer since 1973,? Hunt said. ?As a Christian, I believe that God is the one that gives life ? not politicians or justices. I certainly want to see more babies protected in the womb.?

    No faith is monolithic on the abortion issue. Yet many followers of faiths that don?t prohibit abortion are aghast that a view held by a minority of Americans could supersede their individual rights and religious beliefs.

    In Judaism, for example, many authorities say abortion is permitted or even required in cases where the woman's life is in danger.

    ?This ruling would be outlawing abortion in cases when our religion would permit us," said Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg, scholar in residence at the National Council of Jewish Women, ?and it is basing its concepts of when life begins on someone else?s philosophy or theology.?

    In Islam, similarly, there is room for ?all aspects of reproductive choice from family planning to abortion,? said Nadiah Mohajir, co-founder of Heart Women and Girls, a Chicago nonprofit that works with Muslim communities on reproductive rights and other gender issues.

    ?One particular political agenda is infringing on my right and my religious and personal freedom,? she said.

    According to new data released Wednesday by the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding, 56% of U.S. Muslims say abortion should be legal in most or all cases, a figure that's about on par with the beliefs of U.S. Catholics.

    Donna Nicolino, a student at Fire Lotus Temple, a Zen Buddhist center in Brooklyn, said her faith calls on followers to show compassion to others. Restricting or banning abortion fails to consider why women have abortions and would hurt the poor and marginalized the most, she said.

    ?If we truly value life as a culture,? Nicolino said, ?we would take steps like guaranteeing maternal health care, health care for children, decent housing for pregnant women.?

    Sikhism prohibits sex-selective killings ? female infanticide ? but is more nuanced when it comes to abortion and favors compassion and personal choice, said Harinder Singh, senior fellow of research and policy at Sikhri, a New Jersey-based nonprofit that creates educational resources about the faith.

    A 2019 survey he co-led with research associate Jasleen Kaur found that 65% of Sikhs said abortion should be up to the woman instead of the government or faith leaders, while 77% said Sikh institutions should support those who are considering abortions.

    ?The surveyed Sikh community is very clear that no religious or political authority should be deciding this issue,? Singh said.

    Compassion is a virtue emphasized as well by some Christian leaders who are calling on their ardently anti-abortion colleagues to lower the temperature as they speak out on the issue.

    The Rev. Kirk Winslow, pastor of Canvas Presbyterian Church in Irvine, California, said he views abortion through a human and spiritual lens instead of as a political issue. Communities should turn to solutions such as counseling centers, parenting courses, health care and education, he said, instead of getting ?drawn into a culture war.?

    He has counseled women struggling with whether to have an abortion, and stresses the importance of empathy.

    ?Amidst the pain, fear and confusion of an unexpected pregnancy, no one has ever said, ?I?m excited to get an abortion,?? Winslow said. ?And there are times when getting an abortion may be the best chance we have to bring God?s peace to the situation. And I know many would disagree with that position. I would only respond that most haven?t been in my office for these very real and very difficult conversations.?

    Likewise, Caitlyn Stenerson, an Evangelical Covenant Church pastor and campus minister in Minnesota's Twin Cities area, called on faith leaders to ?tread carefully,? bearing in mind that women in their pews may have had abortions for a variety of reasons and may be grieving and wrestling with trauma.

    ?As a pastor my job isn?t to heap more shame on people but to bring them to Jesus,? Stenerson said. ?We are called to speak truth, but with love.?

    Ahead of a final court ruling expected to be handed down this summer, faith leaders on both sides are preparing for the possibility of abortion becoming illegal in many states.

    The Rev. Sarah Halverson-Cano, senior pastor of Irvine United Congregational Church in Irvine, California, said her congregation is considering providing sanctuary and other support to women who may travel to the state to end their pregnancies. On Tuesday, the day after the draft opinion leaked, she led congregants and community members in a rally for abortion rights in nearby Santa Ana.

    ?Our faith calls us to be responsive to those in need,? Halverson-Cano said. ?It?s time to stand with women and families and look into how to respond to this horrible injustice.?

    Niklas Koehler, president of the Students for Life group at Franciscan University of Steubenville, a private Catholic college in eastern Ohio, said he and others regularly attend a special Mass on Saturday with prayers for an end to abortion. They then travel across the state line to nearby Pittsburgh to hold a prayer vigil and distribute leaflets outside an abortion clinic.

    Actions like that will continue to be necessary even if the draft opinion becomes the law of the land, Koehler said, because abortion will likely remain legal in states such as Pennsylvania.

    ?We will still be going to pray outside the clinic,? he said.

  19. #44
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    First of all. SEPARATION OF CHURCH AND STATE. Have people forgotten this? If your religion is against abortion, then don't get one. It's really that simple. Your stupid interpretation of the Bible isn't what I believe. There's MULTIPLE verses in the Bible that claim that life begins at first breath so they're not even following what their stupid book days.

    Also, fuck this guy:

    You don?t fix a crime committing another crime,? Rodriguez said.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    That is too pretty to be shoved up an ass.

  20. #45
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Everyone who isn't post menopausal or already sterilized should think about getting their tubes tied ASAP!

    https://www.cnn.com/2022/05/08/polit...ntv/index.html

    Mississippi governor declines to rule out contraception bans, saying his state ?isn?t presently focused? on it

    Mississippi Republican Gov. Tate Reeves on Sunday hedged when asked if his state would consider banning certain forms of birth control if the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, only offering that it?s ?not what we are focused on at this time.?

    ?And while I?m sure there will be conversations around America regarding [birth control] it?s not something that we?ve spent a lot of time focused on,? Reeves told CNN?s Jake Tapper on ?State of the Union? when asked if his state would consider targeting intrauterine devices and Plan B ? amid some Republican calls to ban forms of birth control. During an interview on NBC?s ?Meet the Press? later Sunday, Reeves said he didn?t think future Mississippi legislation would ?apply to those that choose to use birth control.?

    Gillibrand says abortion rights supporters are in the 'biggest fight of a generation'

    His comments come against the backdrop of rising concern among abortion rights activists after Politico last week reported on a draft Supreme Court majority opinion that would strike down Roe v. Wade. The opinion is not final, and it is possible the vote count will change before a formal opinion is later rolled out, likely by the end of June.

    But already, lawmakers in both red and blue states are beginning to draw new battle lines in expectation of a patchwork system where abortion rights are no longer protected nationwide.

    Mississippi is one of 13 states that has passed a so-called ?trigger? law poised to go into effect almost immediately if Roe v. Wade is overturned. The state?s law says that within 10 days of the state attorney general confirming Roe has been overturned, abortions are prohibited in the state. Limited exceptions are provided in cases of rape or when the procedure would preserve the mother?s life.

    Mississippi passed a separate 15-week abortion ban in 2018, which is the source of the case currently in front of the Supreme Court.
    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinio...tion-rcna27794

    Why I eagerly chose sterilization at 24

    In November I went under the knife for a bilateral salpingectomy, the removal of both of my fallopian tubes, at 24 years old. The procedure is permanent, irreversible and more than 99 percent effective in preventing pregnancy. Three months earlier on a muggy August day in Washington, D.C., I had walked into my gynecologist?s office to inquire about the procedure. I?d heard horror stories of doctors refusing to conduct the surgery on young, unmarried patients and expected similar disregard. However, I met with my surgeon within the week. She sat on a stool across from me and told me, ?I?m not one of those paternalistic doctors. We?ll go through all the pros and cons so you can make an informed decision and whatever you decide is right for you, we?ll do.?

    Everyone seeking access to reproductive health care deserves an affirming experience like mine. But the leaked Supreme Court opinion draft that would overturn Roe v. Wade, the landmark 1973 decision that established a constitutional right to abortion nationwide, and turn the decision back to states, could prevent conversations like this from happening.

    Growing up in Indiana, where access to abortion and reproductive care is increasingly restricted, I saw firsthand how this basic right could be stripped away. In 2015, the GOP-controlled state House and Senate, and Mike Pence, who was the governor of Indiana at the time, faced national scrutiny for the Religious Freedom and Restoration Act, which is still in effect today. It was modeled after federal legislation cited in the Supreme Court decision that allowed Hobby Lobby and other corporations with religious objections to refuse insurance coverage for certain contraceptives.

    Many criticized the Indiana law for being written in a way that could allow doctors to deny services, including reproductive care, based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Following widespread boycotts to protect LGBTQ+ Hoosiers from discrimination, an amendment was later added to clarify that the law didn?t authorize providers to ?refuse to offer or provide services, facilities, use of public accommodations, goods, employment, or housing to any member or members of the general public on the basis of race, color, religion, ancestry, age, national origin, disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or United States military service? ? but many argue it lacks teeth. As vice president, Pence later championed a similar rule allowing health providers to refuse services such as abortion on religious grounds.

    According to the Guttmacher Institute, as of 2017, there were only nine abortion facilities in the state, and 70 percent of women lived in a county that didn?t have one whatsoever. And fake ?crisis pregnancy clinics? that falsely advertise reproductive care services and lie to unsuspecting pregnant people to prevent them from getting abortions have flourished across the state. Those who are able to get the care they need must often foot a $500-$1,000 bill.

    I saw the dangers of this in high school when my best friend accidentally got pregnant. I secretly escorted her to an abortion clinic hoping for a consultation. To get a ride, my brother unknowingly dropped us off at a nearby store, and we walked along a grassy ditch to get to the clinic. We were met by protesters carrying 5-foot-tall wooden crosses, handing out plastic ?fetus? replicas and DVDs on the horrors of abortion, while they screamed, ?Your body is a temple!? We made it through the two sets of locked, bullet-proof glass doors before we were turned away because she didn?t have an appointment, which required parental consent ? unless she got a judge to bypass the requirement. We were 16 and couldn?t figure out how to get around that. She was forced to carry the pregnancy.

    This experience is tragically common. My home state has one of the highest teen birth rates in the country, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Out of more than 7,600 abortions recorded in 2019, nearly 800 were for teenagers under the age of 19. This is driven, in part, by the ?abstinence-only? curriculum, which blocks mention of contraception and teaches students that the only method to prevent pregnancy is by not having sex until (assumed heterosexual) marriage. Abstinence-only programs don?t work. In fact, people denied sexual education and access to contraceptives are more likely to have unprotected sex than their informed peers. Contraception is the most effective method to prevent sexually transmitted infections, unplanned pregnancies and abortions. Yet our leaders continue to justify their accelerating attempts to restrict basic sexual health care and education.

    Lawmakers legislate who gives birth and who doesn?t to exert power ? particularly over poor people, Black people and other people of color. States pushing to quell abortion have also seen unexpected ramifications of these restrictive laws. ?Heartbeat? bills, which aim to ban all abortions six weeks after conception, which is sometimes less than a week after a missed period, are having an adverse effect. Instead of cutting down on abortions, the limited time sometimes forces people to rush the decision over whether to continue a pregnancy, and they choose to have an abortion before the six-week mark out of fear of missing the cutoff time.

    There?s a tug-of-war between politicians who run on platforms to restrict access to reproductive health services and people who then respond by taking their health into their own hands. I was among the thousands of people who rushed to get an IUD in the wake of Donald Trump?s election. Having lived under Pence as governor, I knew that he and his supporters would stop at nothing to gut access to reproductive care.

    I was still living in Indiana at the time and had to meet my doctor at an unfamiliar, rented out facility because the Catholic hospital network where she practiced banned contraception and abortion procedures on its campus. She was in a rush because she had to drive back to the hospital after my procedure where another patient of hers was in active labor.

    Ironically, in my efforts to prevent pregnancy, I experienced excruciating pain equivalent to a contraction. The relief I?d felt was quickly overshadowed by the dread knowing I would have to replace it every few years. Anything was preferable to pregnancy ? I?ve always known I never want to go through that ? but I felt demoralized that the only ?choices? I?d had up to that point were between bad and worse. Four years and two IUDs later, I eagerly chose to pursue sterilization and am thrilled with my decision.

    Getting my fallopian tubes removed means I will never have to go through pregnancy against my will. Millions of others will not be able to say the same, as the Supreme Court appears ready to strike down Roe v. Wade. Growing up witnessing the political football lawmakers play with our bodies and the devastating impact it has on people?s lives made sterilization a no-brainer for me. People are entitled to the care that?s best for them ? abortion, contraception and sexual health services are key components of that.

  21. #46
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    We're literally living in a nightmare.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    That is too pretty to be shoved up an ass.

  22. #47
    Cousin Greg Angiebla's Avatar
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    I cant help but feel bad for these women that will be forced into something they dont want to do. Being pregnant is really scary and anxiety inducing, even for a planned pregnancy. I couldnt imagine carrying a baby to term against my wishes.

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  23. #48
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Well. They did it. This is literally a violent assault on women as women are going to die.

    Last edited by Boston Babe 73; 06-24-2022 at 07:40 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    That is too pretty to be shoved up an ass.

  24. #49
    Cousin Greg Angiebla's Avatar
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    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  25. #50
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Babe 73 View Post
    Well. They did it. This is literally a violent assault on women as women are going to die.
    The first of many assaults I'm afraid.

    https://www.cnn.com/2022/06/24/polit...ves/index.html

    Justices spar over how Roe reversal puts precedents on gay rights and contraceptives at risk

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