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Thread: Roe v. Wade (49) to be execuited by Supreme Court

  1. #76
    Scoopski Potatoes Nic B's Avatar
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    I just can't.


    Quote Originally Posted by marakisses View Post
    yes i said i will leave it under you storage he said cuddle with me i said shut up it over??? what am i doing wrong??
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    Happy Birthday! I hid a dead body in your backyard to celebrate. Good luck finding it under the cement. You can only use a stick to look for it.

  2. #77
    Cousin Greg Angiebla's Avatar
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    The good thing is a lot of celebrities are supporting women at this time.

    Pink is a bad ass.

    https://www.newsweek.com/pink-urges-...-music-1719365

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

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    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  3. #78
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    They're saving babies! Isn't a 10 year old abused girl a baby and isn't her life important?

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...0a81b391547180

    10-year-old girl denied abortion in Ohio

    A 10-year-old girl was denied an abortion in Ohio after the Supreme Court ruled last week that it was overturning Roe v. Wade, demonstrating the tangible impacts that the high court’s decision is having on patients seeking access to the medical procedure.

    A child abuse doctor in Ohio contacted Dr. Caitlin Bernard, an obstetrician-gynecologist in Indiana, after receiving a 10-year-old patient who was six weeks and three days pregnant, the Indianapolis Star reported.

    That patient is now heading west to Indiana given that an abortion ban in Ohio, which prohibits the medical procedure when fetal cardiac activity begins, around six weeks, had become effective quickly after the high court issued its decision.
    Last edited by raisedbywolves; 07-02-2022 at 07:54 AM.

  4. #79
    Cousin Greg Angiebla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    They're saving babies! Isn't a 10 year old abused girl a baby and isn't her life important?

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...0a81b391547180

    10-year-old girl denied abortion in Ohio
    WTF Ohio has a 6 week abortion ban? And they wouldnt let a 10 year old get one? That poor girl. Looks like a lot of ohio people will be headed to Indiana.

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  5. #80
    Cousin Greg Angiebla's Avatar
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    Im still mad about this. Most women dont know they are pregnant at 6 weeks.

    A 10 year old abuse victim NEEDS an abortion. I dont believe they are physically and emotionally able to carry a child.

    Im sickened by Ohio right now.

  6. #81
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...0d0f96d1ebcee8

    Kristi Noem Defends Abortion Law When Asked If It Would Force A 10-Year-Old To Give Birth

    South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem (R) defended her state?s abortion ban on CNN Sunday when asked if it would force a 10-year-old rape victim to give birth.

    A trigger law took effect in South Dakota following the Supreme Court?s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, banning abortions except when the pregnant person?s life is at risk.

    On ?State of the Union,? CNN?s Dana Bash asked Noem about a report last week that a 10-year-old victim of child abuse was forced to travel from Ohio to Indiana to receive an abortion due to Ohio?s ban on abortions after six weeks. The child was reportedly six weeks and three days pregnant.

    Bash asked the South Dakota governor if her state would force someone in that situation to give birth.

    Noem did not answer the question and pivoted instead to discussing the attacker.

    ?What?s incredible is that nobody is talking about the pervert, horrible and deranged individual that raped a 10-year-old, and what are we doing about that?? she said. ?As much as we talk about what we can do for that little girl, I think we also need to be addressing those sick individuals that do this to our children.?

    Bash agreed that that was an important discussion to have, but redirected her to the question. ?Our bodies are our bodies and women are the ones who get pregnant and in this case it wasn?t a woman, it was a girl. Should she have to have a child?? she asked.

    Noem replied that ?every single life is precious? and ?this tragedy is horrific.?

    ?But, in South Dakota, the law today is that the abortions are illegal, except to save the life of the mother.?

    She said she would not be in favor of amending the state?s law.

    ?I don?t believe a tragic situation should be perpetuated by another tragedy,? she said.

    When Bash asked the question again, noting that a 10-year-old would suffer both mental and likely physical harm from carrying a child, Noem said: ?I think that?s something that ― yeah, that situation, the doctor, the family, the individuals closest to that will make the decisions there for that family.?
    Um, yeah Kristi...that's exactly how it should be and that's EXACTLY what you and your minions took away.

  7. #82
    Cousin Greg Angiebla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/polit...0d0f96d1ebcee8

    Kristi Noem Defends Abortion Law When Asked If It Would Force A 10-Year-Old To Give Birth



    Um, yeah Kristi...that's exactly how it should be and that's EXACTLY what you and your minions took away.
    She took away the ability for the family to choose. Does she not get that? Sexual assault victims have to give birth.

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  8. #83
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/w...wade-rcna35431

    This woman died because of an abortion ban. Americans fear they could be next.

    After the Supreme Court?s historic decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, some doctors are highlighting the 2012 death of a pregnant woman in Ireland and warning that the same thing could happen on a large scale in the United States.

    Dr. Savita Halappanavar, a 31-year-old Indian-born dentist, died in 2012 in Galway, on Ireland?s west coast, after she was denied an abortion by doctors who cited the country?s strict laws, despite there being no chance of her baby?s survival, according to Ireland?s official report on the case.

    Her death shook the foundations of the traditionally conservative and predominantly Roman Catholic country, and catalyzed its pro-abortion rights movement. In a 2018 referendum, Irish people voted by a two-thirds majority to legalize the procedure.

    The avoidable death of Halappanavar, who was 17 weeks pregnant, proved that doctors ? not politicians, police and judges ? should help decide the best course of action in similar cases, according to Dr. Sabaratnam Arulkumaran, the expert who in 2013 wrote the official report on the case.

    ?That?s why Biden said that the issue should be between the patient and the doctor, rather than with the law,? he told NBC News by phone, referring to President Joe Biden?s speech reacting to Roe v. Wade?s reversal June 24.

    In Halappanavar?s case, doctors opted against an abortion because the fetus had a heart rate and anyone carrying out a termination could theoretically have been prosecuted at a later date.

    ?Because the fetal heart rate was present all the time, the obstetrician did not do a termination. If someone decided that she had done it illegally, she would have gone to jail,? he said, referring to the doctor attending on Halappanavar.

    Arulkumaran, a professor emeritus of obstetrics and gynecology at St. George?s University of London, added that mothers? lives are at stake in the United States.

    ?I think maternal mortality will go up,? he said. ?I think those who are going to be affected are those from lower socioeconomic groups, adolescents, those who don?t have facilities to go for termination.?
    ?Unbearable? pain

    Back pain first sent Halappanavar to Galway University Hospital on Oct. 21, 2012. She was sent home but returned just hours later after she ?felt something coming down? and said she had ?pushed a leg back in.? A midwife confirmed no fetal parts could be seen, according to the official report. Later that day, she described the pain as ?unbearable,? according to the official report.

    She was admitted and on Oct. 23, a doctor told her a miscarriage was ?inevitable? due to the rupturing of the membranes that protect the fetus in the womb, despite the fact that her baby was a normal size and was registering a heart beat. The medical team had decided to ?monitor the fetal heart in case an accelerated delivery might be possible once the fetal heart stopped,? the official report said.In Halappanavar?s case, an accelerated delivery would likely have meant a medically induced miscarriage.

    When, on Oct. 23, Halappanavar and her husband, Praveen, asked about medically inducing the miscarriage instead of delaying the inevitable, a doctor told them: ?Under Irish law, if there?s no evidence of risk to the life of the mother, our hands are tied so long as there?s a fetal heart[beat],? the official report said.

    The report added that once their waters have broken, pregnant women are at very high risk of infection, which in some cases can be fatal.

    On Oct. 28 at 1:09 a.m., having caught an infection and gone into septic shock, Halappanavar was pronounced dead.

    ?It was a life-threatening condition but they took the view of not doing anything because of the legal framework,? Arulkumaran said in the interview.

    Praveen Halappanavar, who didn?t respond to a request for comment, told The Guardian newspaper in 2013 that the inquest into his wife?s death ?vindicated? his version of events. He told the inquest that a doctor told him an abortion couldn?t be performed because ?this is a Catholic country.

    After the report was released University Hospital Galway apologized to Halappanavar?s family in a statement which said it ?was clear? that ?there were failures in the standards of care provided.?

    ?We can reassure all concerned that we have already implemented changes to avoid the repeat of such an event,? it added.
    Threat to a mother?s life

    While some American states have enacted ?trigger laws? banning abortion ? some offering exceptions such as in the case of rape or incest, and all currently allow abortion if the mother?s life is seriously at risk ? many experts question how easy it will be to get such an exception. In addition, asking doctors to interpret complex legislation in the middle of a medical emergency can lead to dangerous decisions, they said.

    Irish law in 2012 allowed abortion to prevent a ?potential major hazard or threat to the mother?s life.? But the Halappanavar report said a doctor decided the point at which an abortion was ?allowable in Irish law? had not been reached.

    This is not a theoretical scenario in the U.S., said Dr. Jen Gunter, an OB-GYN based in California and the author of ?The Vagina Bible.?

    ?I?ve personally been in a situation where due to the state law, abortion was illegal at our medical center and we had a patient who needed one,? she said in an interview, declining to share any further details of the case aside from the fact that it was in Kansas, where abortion is legal up to 22 weeks with some restrictions.

    ?It wasn?t a pregnancy complication, her organs were failing because of the extra burden of pregnancy due to her underlying condition,? she added.

    The attorneys at the medical center in Kansas told Gunter she couldn?t perform the abortion unless the woman was in ?imminent danger.?

    ?I was like, ?What does that mean?? And their interpretation was that she was going to die in the next three minutes,? she said. Gunter said the hospital attorneys set up a call with the state politician involved in the legislation, who told her, ?Do what you think is best, doctor.?

    ?So I thought, ?Then why do we have this law??? she said.

    Gunter is unsparing in her prediction for what tighter abortion laws could mean in the U.S.

    She said women could die despite better antibiotics to treat septic abortions

    ?Halappanavar? That won?t ever change things in the States when that happens here, and it will happen.?

    Lawmaker Ivana Bacik, leader of the Irish Labour Party and a long-standing advocate of abortion rights, led a protest against the Supreme Court decision outside the American Embassy in Dublin on Monday ?in solidarity for American women and girls.?

    ?Our experience here is that banning and criminalizing abortion puts women?s lives in danger. It?s very clear that?s the appalling reality now for American women,? she said.

    ?If you remove the right to abortion from women and girls, you endanger lives. The reality is that there will be life-threatening conditions in pregnancy that will threaten lives and health.?

    Bacik said Halappanavar?s story was instrumental in turning public opinion toward a ?yes? vote in 2018. As was the case of a brain-dead woman in Ireland whose life support machine was only turned off more than three weeks after she was declared clinically dead in 2014 following a protracted legal battle because she was 18 weeks pregnant.

    In their submission to Ireland?s ongoing government review of abortion laws, a group of 20 women?s rights and heath care charities commissioned polling in March showing 67% of people across the island supported free access to abortion ? mirroring the support for the ?yes? vote in 2018.
    Multiple cases of women dying after being denied abortions have emerged from Poland, which has a near-total abortion ban. Last year, a 30-year-old woman known only as Izabela, who was 22 weeks pregnant, died of septic shock, her family said. Scans had shown multiple problems with the fetus but doctors refused to terminate while there was a fetal heartbeat, Reuters reported.

    After fetal death, doctors could then legally operate. But Izabela’s heart stopped on the way to the operating theater to have a cesarean section.

    At subsequent mass protests in Poland, flags were raised bearing the slogan: “Her heart was beating too.”
    Patrick Smith

    MDS thread for Savita:
    http://mydeathspace.com/vb/showthrea...enied-Abortion
    Last edited by raisedbywolves; 07-04-2022 at 08:41 AM.

  9. #84
    Moderator puzzld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    She took away the ability for the family to choose. Does she not get that? Sexual assault victims have to give birth.
    Not at all. They can still leave the state, go to Minn. or Colo. or... In a deplorable way, nothing has really changed in SD we had one clinic that would do very early terminations with a 3-day waiting period, so you might have to travel hundreds of miles and take a week off from work. If you have the cash your problem is solved. If not you get to have a child that we surely won't help you feed or provide care for. So meh. Now once she gets her checkpoints set up so no woman under 60 can leave the state?

    Any who. The crazy thing is, that the legislature has banned abortion several times and the voters have rejected the bans. So hopefully we will reject her new bans and all of her evil works.
    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    lol at Nestle being some vicious smiter, she's the nicest person on this site besides probably puzzld. Or at least the last person to resort to smiting.
    Quote Originally Posted by nestlequikie View Post
    Why on earth would I smite you when I can ban you?

  10. #85
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by puzzld View Post
    Not at all. They can still leave the state, go to Minn. or Colo. or... In a deplorable way, nothing has really changed in SD we had one clinic that would do very early terminations with a 3-day waiting period, so you might have to travel hundreds of miles and take a week off from work. If you have the cash your problem is solved. If not you get to have a child that we surely won't help you feed or provide care for. So meh. Now once she gets her checkpoints set up so no woman under 60 can leave the state?

    Any who. The crazy thing is, that the legislature has banned abortion several times and the voters have rejected the bans. So hopefully we will reject her new bans and all of her evil works.
    So are we going to require visas for women to travel between the states now? I could see the GOP doing it. Plenty of people cross state lines to go things that are illegal in their home states and no one cares, but they are up in arms that women are traveling for abortions. So much for states rights. States get rights as long as they agree with the GOP. Also, they are all about corporations having rights, unless they aren't the 'correct' beliefs. They are trying to out crazy each other with their extremist RWNJ views.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/w...-b2112084.html

    Texas attorney general wants to prosecute companies that help women access abortions

  11. #86
    Moderator puzzld's Avatar
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    I'm very much a "safe, legal, and rare" person. In my perfect world, no one who doesn't want a child would get pregnant. BC would be readily and cheaply available. No wanted pregnancy would go off the rails endangering the mother and/or producing defects incompatible with life. No family would be in the position of deciding they just can't "welcome" one or five more. No 50-year-old empty nester should have to derail her future retirement to provide for a change of life baby (unless she wants to) But until that glorious day, I'm not inclined to set myself up as judge and jury to decide for someone else.

    I have a friend who was the receptionist at a busy PP clinic. She assures me that not one woman ever came bouncing in for a procedure. It was always a tough situation. We talk about the 10-year-old assault victim, but what about the 30-year-old with 4 kids she can't care for? The 18-year-old college student who frankly doesn't know for sure who the father is. The meth addict. Do we want her to raise kids? At least she's self-aware enough to say no!
    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    lol at Nestle being some vicious smiter, she's the nicest person on this site besides probably puzzld. Or at least the last person to resort to smiting.
    Quote Originally Posted by nestlequikie View Post
    Why on earth would I smite you when I can ban you?

  12. #87
    Moderator puzzld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    So are we going to require visas for women to travel between the states now? I could see the GOP doing it. Plenty of people cross state lines to go things that are illegal in their home states and no one cares, but they are up in arms that women are traveling for abortions. So much for states rights. States get rights as long as they agree with the GOP. Also, they are all about corporations having rights, unless they aren't the 'correct' beliefs. They are trying to out crazy each other with their extremist RWNJ views.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/news/w...-b2112084.html

    Texas attorney general wants to prosecute companies that help women access abortions
    You know those tracking chips that we were so worried about in the Covid shots? No need for a visa system. Actually, we don't even need that, find my phone probably means we have the technology to do it.
    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    lol at Nestle being some vicious smiter, she's the nicest person on this site besides probably puzzld. Or at least the last person to resort to smiting.
    Quote Originally Posted by nestlequikie View Post
    Why on earth would I smite you when I can ban you?

  13. #88
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by puzzld View Post
    I'm very much a "safe, legal, and rare" person. In my perfect world, no one who doesn't want a child would get pregnant. BC would be readily and cheaply available. No wanted pregnancy would go off the rails endangering the mother and/or producing defects incompatible with life. No family would be in the position of deciding they just can't "welcome" one or five more. No 50-year-old empty nester should have to derail her future retirement to provide for a change of life baby (unless she wants to) But until that glorious day, I'm not inclined to set myself up as judge and jury to decide for someone else.

    I have a friend who was the receptionist at a busy PP clinic. She assures me that not one woman ever came bouncing in for a procedure. It was always a tough situation. We talk about the 10-year-old assault victim, but what about the 30-year-old with 4 kids she can't care for? The 18-year-old college student who frankly doesn't know for sure who the father is. The meth addict. Do we want her to raise kids? At least she's self-aware enough to say no!
    I have never been pregnant, never had an abortion, but always supported every woman's right to choose. My older sister has 4 kids and had 2 abortions after her first kid, for really frivolous reasons. According to her all of her kids were not planned, but she kept the other ones. I am not 100% sure, but I think I am the only person she ever told about her abortions (this was during one of the brief times in our lives where we were friends). She was very pro-choice and an outspoken Clinton supporter at this time. Fast forward a few years and she is a card carrying RWNJ, arguing against abortion rights. I have come to the belief that most outspoken GOP women had their abortions and now want to limit anyone else from having the options they had. They want to pull the ladder up after them, to keep anyone else from being able to get the help that they did. They are the worst.

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzld View Post
    You know those tracking chips that we were so worried about in the Covid shots? No need for a visa system. Actually, we don't even need that, find my phone probably means we have the technology to do it.
    True, and the anti-vaxxers would probably be cheering all women getting fixed with a chip.

  14. #89
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.cnn.com/2022/07/11/healt...law/index.html

    Biden administration says federal law preempts state abortion bans when emergency care is needed

    In new clarifying guidance announced Monday, the Biden administration said that federal law preempts state abortion bans when emergency care is needed and that the federal government can penalize institutions or providers that fail to provide abortions as needed to treat medical emergencies.

    "Under the law, no matter where you live, women have the right to emergency care -- including abortion care," HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra said in a news release Monday. "Today, in no uncertain terms, we are reinforcing that we expect providers to continue offering these services, and that federal law preempts state abortion bans when needed for emergency care."

    In more than a dozen states, legal fights are underway over abortion bans and other laws that strictly limit the procedure after the US Supreme Court overturned the Roe v. Wade decision June 24.

    In a letter to the nation's health care providers on Monday, Becerra said a federal statute called the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, also known as EMTALA, protects providers' clinical judgment and the actions they take to provide stabilizing treatment to pregnant patients who are under emergency medical conditions, regardless of restrictions in any given state.

    The act has been on the books since 1986. It specifically requires all patients get appropriate medical screening, examination, stabilizing treatment and facility transfer.

    The administration said examples of emergency medical conditions include, but are not limited to, ectopic pregnancy -- when the fertilized egg grows outside a woman's uterus -- and complications of miscarriages. Stabilizing treatment could include abortion.

    Becerra said that if a state law bans abortion and does not include an exception for the life or health of the pregnant person, that law is preempted by the federal statute.

    "We heard a lot from physicians that we needed to be clearer on these points because people were still too scared to treat people," a senior adviser with HHS said in a background briefing. The new guidance is "meant to try to provide that reassurance here on the clinical judgment of these physicians and hospitals."

    HHS said it will do everything within its authority to ensure that patients get the care they need.

    The statute applies to emergency departments and other specific clinical settings. Providers also will not have to wait for a patient's condition to worsen to be protected.

    Investigation and enforcement under the statute depend on people making a complaint to the government.

    If a hospital is found to be in violation of the statute, it could lose its Medicare and Medicaid provider agreements and could face civil penalties. An individual physician could also face civil penalties if they are found to be in violation.

    HHS may impose a $119,942 fine per violation for hospitals with more than 100 beds and $59,973 for hospitals with fewer than 100 beds. A physician could face a $119,942 fine per violation.
    "We are making enforcement a priority," the senior official said.

    A memo from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services said that hospitals should ensure that all staff who may encounter an emergency situation with a pregnant person be aware of the hospital's obligation under EMTALA.

    The statute also has a whistleblower provision that prevents retaliation by a hospital against an employee who refuses to transfer a patient with an emergency medical condition who has not been stabilized.
    "Health care must be between a patient and their doctor, not a politician," Becerra said. "We will continue to leverage all available resources at HHS to make sure women can access the life-saving care they need."

    When the Supreme Court decision came down, several doctors groups criticized the decision as one that interferes with their ability to do their jobs. One, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, called it "a direct blow to bodily autonomy, reproductive health, patient safety, and health equity in the United States."

    The administration has taken several other steps to make sure that women have some access to abortion services and birth control, although the President does not have the direct ability to restore access to abortion nationwide.

    On Friday, President Biden signed an executive order that is meant to protect access to medication abortion, patient privacy and emergency contraception, and to launch public education efforts.

    Biden directed Becerra to submit a report on actions his department is taking to ensure reproductive health care access. HHS will take action to expand access to emergency contraception and long-acting reversible contraception like intrauterine devices.

    Attorney General Merrick Garland has also issued a statement saying states cannot ban mifepristone, a medication used to end early pregnancy that has FDA approval.

  15. #90
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Pass crazy restrictive laws that label routine health care as 'baby murder'...what could go wrong?! In other news, the GOP was labeling the 10 year old that was raped and got pregnant as fake news. They seriously thought a 10 year old couldn't get pregnant. But these are the people making health care laws for women. You can't make this shit up.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/te...out&li=BBnb7Kz

    Texas hospitals are refusing to see people with serious pregnancy issues for fear of violating post-Roe abortion ban, medical group says

  16. #91
    Cousin Greg Angiebla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Pass crazy restrictive laws that label routine health care as 'baby murder'...what could go wrong?! In other news, the GOP was labeling the 10 year old that was raped and got pregnant as fake news. They seriously thought a 10 year old couldn't get pregnant. But these are the people making health care laws for women. You can't make this shit up.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/te...out&li=BBnb7Kz

    Texas hospitals are refusing to see people with serious pregnancy issues for fear of violating post-Roe abortion ban, medical group says
    I got into an arguement with someone about being able to become pregnant at 10. My bff in grade school had a teacher ask her to wear a bra in second grade because she had boobs. She had her period at 9, and her mom said to her "now you can have babies". She was so upset and confused.

    Thats messed up that pregnant people with complications cant get help. I thought they were allowed to do abortions if the mother's life is in danger?

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  17. #92
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Now that I'm here, I'm tempted to just block all of this shit out. Most over here don't even realize what's happening in America and when I tell them they think I'm lying. Then when they realize that I'm not, they basically don't want to know about it. They have a mentality over here of minding their own business instead of trying to save the world. Part of me finds that frustrating and horrible and the other part of me is jealous that they can do that.

    Why can't I just bring you all here? I wish I could.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    That is too pretty to be shoved up an ass.

  18. #93
    Cousin Greg Angiebla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Babe 73 View Post
    Now that I'm here, I'm tempted to just block all of this shit out. Most over here don't even realize what's happening in America and when I tell them they think I'm lying. Then when they realize that I'm not, they basically don't want to know about it. They have a mentality over here of minding their own business instead of trying to save the world. Part of me finds that frustrating and horrible and the other part of me is jealous that they can do that.

    Why can't I just bring you all here? I wish I could.
    Some people in my family have been like that, burying their head in the sand. It makes me want to scream and Im a pretty mild mannered.

    Can I come to Ireland? Ohio sucks balls.

    I took an early pregnancy test at 6 weeks one day and I was negative, the next day, I was positive. I called the doctor to make an appointment and They told me the pregnany is barely viable at 8 weeks, they will see me at 10 weeks If I would have just taken the 1 test, I wouldnt have known I was pregnant. The 6 week thing is a fucking joke.

    ETA:
    Here’s the thing: Because of the way pregnancy is usually measured, you’re not actually pregnant during the first two weeks or so of your pregnancy. Healthcare providers calculate the length of an average pregnancy as 40 weeks, starting from the first day of your last menstrual period—this is known as the LMP dating method.
    So the first 2 weeks dont count. So basically you cant get an abortion after 4 weeks, which is barely a missed period, and thats if you are regular.
    Last edited by Angiebla; 07-16-2022 at 01:47 PM.

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  19. #94
    Moderator puzzld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    Thats messed up that pregnant people with complications cant get help. I thought they were allowed to do abortions if the mother's life is in danger?
    A woman with a life-threatening ectopic pregnancy sought emergency care at the University of Michigan Hospital after a doctor in her home state worried that the presence of a fetal heartbeat meant treating her might run afoul of new restrictions on abortion.

    At one Kansas City, Mo., hospital, administrators temporarily required ?pharmacist approval? before dispensing medications used to stop postpartum hemorrhages, because they can also be also used for abortions.

    And in Wisconsin, a woman bled for more than 10 days from an incomplete miscarriage after emergency room staff would not remove the fetal tissue amid a confusing legal landscape that has roiled obstetric care.

    In the three weeks of turmoil since the Supreme Court overturned the constitutional right to abortion, many physicians and patients have been navigating a new reality in which the standard of care for incomplete miscarriages, ectopic pregnancies and other common complications is being scrutinized, delayed ? even denied ? jeopardizing maternal health, according to the accounts of doctors in multiple states where new laws have gone into effect.

    While state abortion bans typically carve out exceptions when a woman?s life is endangered, the laws can be murky, prompting some obstetricians to consult lawyers and hospital ethics committees on decisions around routine care.

    Physicians face confusion and fear in post-Roe world

    ?People are running scared,? said Mae Winchester, a specialist in maternal-fetal medicine in Ohio who, days after the state?s new restrictions went into effect, sought legal advice before she performed an abortion on a pregnant woman with a uterine infection. ?There?s a lot of unknowns still left out there.?

    The need to intervene in a pregnancy with the same medication or surgical procedure used in elective abortions is not unusual.

    As many as 30 percent of pregnancies end in miscarriage, the spontaneous demise of a fetus, commonly because of chromosomal abnormalities. The methods of managing a miscarriage are the same as for abortion, using a combination of drugs ? mifepristone and misoprostol ? or a brief surgery known as dilation and curettage, or D&C, to dilate the cervix and scrape tissue from the uterus. Left untreated, some miscarriages resolve naturally; others lead to complications such as infection or profuse bleeding.

    ?It?s important for people to realize early pregnancy failure is common,? said Rashmi Kudesia, a fertility specialist in Houston.

    Doctors in Texas ? where since last September abortion has been illegal after the detection of fetal cardiac activity, around six weeks of pregnancy ? report that pharmacists have begun questioning patients about miscarriage medications, suspecting they may be used instead for abortions.

    ?It is traumatizing to stand in a pharmacy and have to tell them publicly that you are having a miscarriage, that there is not a heartbeat,? Kudesia said.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/healt...regnancy-care/
    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    lol at Nestle being some vicious smiter, she's the nicest person on this site besides probably puzzld. Or at least the last person to resort to smiting.
    Quote Originally Posted by nestlequikie View Post
    Why on earth would I smite you when I can ban you?

  20. #95
    Cousin Greg Angiebla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by puzzld View Post
    A woman with a life-threatening ectopic pregnancy sought emergency care at the University of Michigan Hospital after a doctor in her home state worried that the presence of a fetal heartbeat meant treating her might run afoul of new restrictions on abortion.

    At one Kansas City, Mo., hospital, administrators temporarily required ?pharmacist approval? before dispensing medications used to stop postpartum hemorrhages, because they can also be also used for abortions.

    And in Wisconsin, a woman bled for more than 10 days from an incomplete miscarriage after emergency room staff would not remove the fetal tissue amid a confusing legal landscape that has roiled obstetric care.

    In the three weeks of turmoil since the Supreme Court overturned the constitutional right to abortion, many physicians and patients have been navigating a new reality in which the standard of care for incomplete miscarriages, ectopic pregnancies and other common complications is being scrutinized, delayed ? even denied ? jeopardizing maternal health, according to the accounts of doctors in multiple states where new laws have gone into effect.

    While state abortion bans typically carve out exceptions when a woman?s life is endangered, the laws can be murky, prompting some obstetricians to consult lawyers and hospital ethics committees on decisions around routine care.

    Physicians face confusion and fear in post-Roe world

    ?People are running scared,? said Mae Winchester, a specialist in maternal-fetal medicine in Ohio who, days after the state?s new restrictions went into effect, sought legal advice before she performed an abortion on a pregnant woman with a uterine infection. ?There?s a lot of unknowns still left out there.?

    The need to intervene in a pregnancy with the same medication or surgical procedure used in elective abortions is not unusual.

    As many as 30 percent of pregnancies end in miscarriage, the spontaneous demise of a fetus, commonly because of chromosomal abnormalities. The methods of managing a miscarriage are the same as for abortion, using a combination of drugs ? mifepristone and misoprostol ? or a brief surgery known as dilation and curettage, or D&C, to dilate the cervix and scrape tissue from the uterus. Left untreated, some miscarriages resolve naturally; others lead to complications such as infection or profuse bleeding.

    ?It?s important for people to realize early pregnancy failure is common,? said Rashmi Kudesia, a fertility specialist in Houston.

    Doctors in Texas ? where since last September abortion has been illegal after the detection of fetal cardiac activity, around six weeks of pregnancy ? report that pharmacists have begun questioning patients about miscarriage medications, suspecting they may be used instead for abortions.

    ?It is traumatizing to stand in a pharmacy and have to tell them publicly that you are having a miscarriage, that there is not a heartbeat,? Kudesia said.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/healt...regnancy-care/
    Thats so messed up. In those cases the pregnancy is NOT viable (ectopic) or there is NO heartbeat (miscarriage). Almost everyone I know has miscarried at some point. And the pharmacy asking questions thats none of their business? the fuck outta here.

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  21. #96
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/af...out&li=BBnb7Kz

    After Roe, Pregnant Women With Cancer Diagnoses May Face Wrenching Choices

    If the life of a fetus is paramount, a pregnancy can mean a woman cannot get effective treatment for her cancer. One in a thousand women who gets pregnant each year is diagnosed with cancer, meaning thousands of women are facing a serious and possibly fatal disease while they are expecting a baby.

  22. #97
    Cousin Greg Angiebla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/af...out&li=BBnb7Kz

    After Roe, Pregnant Women With Cancer Diagnoses May Face Wrenching Choices
    So my cousin was pregnant and found out she had cancer. She got the masectomy and chemo but elected to not get radiation. She died 3 years later.

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  23. #98
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    So my cousin was pregnant and found out she had cancer. She got the masectomy and chemo but elected to not get radiation. She died 3 years later.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    That is too pretty to be shoved up an ass.

  24. #99
    Senior Member Bewitchingstorm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    So my cousin was pregnant and found out she had cancer. She got the masectomy and chemo but elected to not get radiation. She died 3 years later.
    That is horrible, Angie. How old was she when she passed?

  25. #100
    Scoopski Potatoes Nic B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    So my cousin was pregnant and found out she had cancer. She got the masectomy and chemo but elected to not get radiation. She died 3 years later.
    That is horrible, I'm so sorry.


    Quote Originally Posted by marakisses View Post
    yes i said i will leave it under you storage he said cuddle with me i said shut up it over??? what am i doing wrong??
    Quote Originally Posted by curiouscat View Post
    Happy Birthday! I hid a dead body in your backyard to celebrate. Good luck finding it under the cement. You can only use a stick to look for it.

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