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Thread: Canadian Police Officer accuses impostor psychologist - real psychologist charged for faking impostor.

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    Canadian Police Officer accuses impostor psychologist - real psychologist charged for faking impostor.

    This gets confusing. An article came out in July 2021 about a female officer who, early on in her career with Ottawa Police, became a whistleblower about sexual harassment on the force. Almost immediately she was stripped of her gun and ordered to see a psychologist for a "Fitness for Duty" exam. After 5 visits with the "psychologist", Dr. Frey, in a closet-like room, Constable Kimberly Cadarette swore he was an impostor. Everyone called her crazy. She got a transfer to a detachment four hours away, but her reputation followed her and years later she ended up on leave with PTSD. Fourteen or so years later, there seems to be no record of her meeting with "Dr. Frey" although she has evidence of a report he wrote and signed. The real Dr. Frey denies ever meeting or interviewing Cst. Cadarette, and they even met on camera for an interview, both claiming they had never seen each other before.

    Here is the twist: the real doc has now been charged for faking that there was a fake doctor!? Cst. Cadarette still maintains she never met with the real Dr. Frey, and Dr. Frey confirms this, but the police are saying that he DID in fact have contact with the constable and they are charging him with mischief. What the heck?!

    Several articles posted below starting with the original reports and ending with the most current arrest of the doctor.

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    https://whistleblowersblog.org/whist...rly-cadarette/

    Manipulated in a Very Sinister Way
    Jane TurnerbyJane Turner July 14, 2021 in Whistleblower of the Week Reading Time: 5 mins read
    Constable Kimberly Cadarette
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    This is a story about every whistleblower’s worst nightmare: the forced fitness for duty exam, a nuclear option used by those in power in order to rid themselves of truth tellers who threaten to expose corruption. It is used more times than most people know, with whistleblowers preferring to quit rather than submit to the humiliation of a mind probe. Other whistleblowers take the exams, and find the process so dehumanizing and belittling that they never mention it, preferring to take it to the grave.

    In 1978, a report by the subcommittee of the House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service, now the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, stated: “The fact that fitness for duty examinations are used as the result of personality conflicts, and for retaliation, means that the morale of federal employees is being undermined, the reputation of the Government damaged, and the purposes of the Congress frustrated.” The subcommittee had the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) change their regulations and put limits on the federal agency’s ability to order fitness for duty examinations.

    Agencies continue to be caught ordering employees to submit to psychiatric or fitness for duty examinations, however, even though the employee did not qualify for the exam under regulations outlined by OPM. In 2010, 6.1% of federal employees who were subjected or threatened with whistleblower retaliation said they experienced retaliation in the form of fitness for duty exams – which was up from 1.6% in 1992, according to this article. Missing from those numbers are whistleblowers who never advised the Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB) that they had suffered the indignities of a fitness for duty exam used as retaliation.



    Attorney John Mahoney advised: “It really is the area that I see as being the most abused in terms of potential discrimination. It is an easy way for an employer to take an employee out of their job duties, especially if the employee is covered by security clearances, and put them on the sideline and force them to fight their way back in by proving that they’re medically fit. And if it does affect a security clearance, it can take a number of months, if not years, for an employee to prove that they are not a security risk due to their ‘perceived’ medical disability.”

    This story is about a Constable in Ottawa, Canada who was forced into a fitness for duty exam because she reported sexual harassment, but the exam was faked and the psychologist was an imposter. This story cries out for justice, and by presenting it in two parts, Whistleblower Network News hopes to address an issue that is well-hidden in the shadows due to shame and stigma: the use of fitness for duty exams to retaliate against whistleblowers.

    Part I
    Kimberly Cadarette was born in Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada to a father, Carl, who “had a heart of gold, laughed easily, and worked at a Chrysler factory.” He was very popular, and told Cadarette: “No matter what you go through, what people put you through in life you just gotta keep pursuing and look for the good.” Her mother and father divorced when Cadarette was five years old because of the physically abusive behavior of Cadarette’s mother. Her mother beat her so badly as a child that Cadarette spent time in a hospital, and now she does not have a relationship with her mother. After the divorce, Cadarette lived with her father, grandmother and aunt in Lasalle, Ontario. She attended St. John the Baptist, a Catholic school, and then Sacred Heart. Cadarette was a good student, and a “good kid” growing up, engaged in martial arts, weightlifting, volleyball, and soccer. She continued her Catholic education, attending St. Thomas of Villanova. From a very early age, Cadarette wanted to be a police officer and help troubled kids, since her childhood was so difficult. Cadarette recalled how important a police officer, David Dean, was to her in Grade 6, and what an impact he made, as she committed to living a life drug and alcohol free.

    Cadarette attended Lambton College in Sarnia, Ontario, where she took classes in Law and Security. Her education was cut short by the death of her father, who died of a heart attack. His passing forced her to move back to Lasalle to take care of her only sibling, a sister. Cadarette was nineteen years old, supporting a sister who was a “wild child” and eventually ran away to Detroit in the United States.

    From 2004 to 2006, Cadarette took employment at a casino, working as a dealer and server while she also took college courses trying to get her degree. But then, the Ottawa Police Department (OPD) hired her. Beginning in January 2006, the hiring process was a whirlwind for Cadarette as she had an interview, psychological testing, and background investigation which she sailed right through. In July of 2006, Cadarette was offered a job as 4th Class Constable for the OPD, which she accepted. On August 14, 2006, Cadarette reported to the Ottawa Police Service for training with 35 other trainees. In September she and her class joined other police officers in training at Ottawa Police College. For three months Cadarette was on cloud nine, excited and living her dream. In November 2006, Cadarette received her badge with her aunt present at graduation.

    There are three divisions in the Ottawa Police Department, Central, East, and West, and Cadarette was assigned the Central area, but she also worked the other two areas. For the first three months Cadarette had a training officer, and after that training period she did not require any further oversight.

    At work Cadarette started noticing that her personal items were missing. Fellow officers started bullying and sexually harassing her. In 2007, she reported the sexual harassment and bullying to her chief, and the quick result was an order for Cadarette to be relieved of her gun, report for a fitness for duty exam, and attend weekly sessions with Dr. Ron Frey, a certified psychologist.

    Cadarette met with Frey several times and a nine page psychological report was issued with Frey’s signature. What Cadarette did not know at the time, however, is that she was meeting with an imposter. Cadarette, who wanted so desperately to help people in her law enforcement career, was being tarred with a falsified report.

    Cadarette had been set up to fail after blowing the whistle on sexual harassment and bullying by her fellow officers. She would not discover the truth for fourteen years, long after she left her job at the Ottawa Police Department.

    “It broke me,” Cadarette stated. Dr. Ron Frey made this statement: “This actually takes it to another level because this is probably criminal. I would think…it also has an impact not just on this particular police officer, but on the profession of psychology.”

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    Manipulated in a Very Sinister Way
    Jane TurnerbyJane Turner July 14, 2021 in Whistleblower of the Week Reading Time: 5 mins read
    Constable Kimberly Cadarette
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    This is a story about every whistleblower?s worst nightmare: the forced fitness for duty exam, a nuclear option used by those in power in order to rid themselves of truth tellers who threaten to expose corruption. It is used more times than most people know, with whistleblowers preferring to quit rather than submit to the humiliation of a mind probe. Other whistleblowers take the exams, and find the process so dehumanizing and belittling that they never mention it, preferring to take it to the grave.

    In 1978, a report by the subcommittee of the House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service, now the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, stated: ?The fact that fitness for duty examinations are used as the result of personality conflicts, and for retaliation, means that the morale of federal employees is being undermined, the reputation of the Government damaged, and the purposes of the Congress frustrated.? The subcommittee had the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) change their regulations and put limits on the federal agency?s ability to order fitness for duty examinations.

    Agencies continue to be caught ordering employees to submit to psychiatric or fitness for duty examinations, however, even though the employee did not qualify for the exam under regulations outlined by OPM. In 2010, 6.1% of federal employees who were subjected or threatened with whistleblower retaliation said they experienced retaliation in the form of fitness for duty exams ? which was up from 1.6% in 1992, according to this article. Missing from those numbers are whistleblowers who never advised the Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB) that they had suffered the indignities of a fitness for duty exam used as retaliation.



    Attorney John Mahoney advised: ?It really is the area that I see as being the most abused in terms of potential discrimination. It is an easy way for an employer to take an employee out of their job duties, especially if the employee is covered by security clearances, and put them on the sideline and force them to fight their way back in by proving that they?re medically fit. And if it does affect a security clearance, it can take a number of months, if not years, for an employee to prove that they are not a security risk due to their ?perceived? medical disability.?

    This story is about a Constable in Ottawa, Canada who was forced into a fitness for duty exam because she reported sexual harassment, but the exam was faked and the psychologist was an imposter. This story cries out for justice, and by presenting it in two parts, Whistleblower Network News hopes to address an issue that is well-hidden in the shadows due to shame and stigma: the use of fitness for duty exams to retaliate against whistleblowers.

    Part I
    Kimberly Cadarette was born in Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada to a father, Carl, who ?had a heart of gold, laughed easily, and worked at a Chrysler factory.? He was very popular, and told Cadarette: ?No matter what you go through, what people put you through in life you just gotta keep pursuing and look for the good.? Her mother and father divorced when Cadarette was five years old because of the physically abusive behavior of Cadarette?s mother. Her mother beat her so badly as a child that Cadarette spent time in a hospital, and now she does not have a relationship with her mother. After the divorce, Cadarette lived with her father, grandmother and aunt in Lasalle, Ontario. She attended St. John the Baptist, a Catholic school, and then Sacred Heart. Cadarette was a good student, and a ?good kid? growing up, engaged in martial arts, weightlifting, volleyball, and soccer. She continued her Catholic education, attending St. Thomas of Villanova. From a very early age, Cadarette wanted to be a police officer and help troubled kids, since her childhood was so difficult. Cadarette recalled how important a police officer, David Dean, was to her in Grade 6, and what an impact he made, as she committed to living a life drug and alcohol free.

    Cadarette attended Lambton College in Sarnia, Ontario, where she took classes in Law and Security. Her education was cut short by the death of her father, who died of a heart attack. His passing forced her to move back to Lasalle to take care of her only sibling, a sister. Cadarette was nineteen years old, supporting a sister who was a ?wild child? and eventually ran away to Detroit in the United States.

    From 2004 to 2006, Cadarette took employment at a casino, working as a dealer and server while she also took college courses trying to get her degree. But then, the Ottawa Police Department (OPD) hired her. Beginning in January 2006, the hiring process was a whirlwind for Cadarette as she had an interview, psychological testing, and background investigation which she sailed right through. In July of 2006, Cadarette was offered a job as 4th Class Constable for the OPD, which she accepted. On August 14, 2006, Cadarette reported to the Ottawa Police Service for training with 35 other trainees. In September she and her class joined other police officers in training at Ottawa Police College. For three months Cadarette was on cloud nine, excited and living her dream. In November 2006, Cadarette received her badge with her aunt present at graduation.

    There are three divisions in the Ottawa Police Department, Central, East, and West, and Cadarette was assigned the Central area, but she also worked the other two areas. For the first three months Cadarette had a training officer, and after that training period she did not require any further oversight.

    At work Cadarette started noticing that her personal items were missing. Fellow officers started bullying and sexually harassing her. In 2007, she reported the sexual harassment and bullying to her chief, and the quick result was an order for Cadarette to be relieved of her gun, report for a fitness for duty exam, and attend weekly sessions with Dr. Ron Frey, a certified psychologist.

    Cadarette met with Frey several times and a nine page psychological report was issued with Frey?s signature. What Cadarette did not know at the time, however, is that she was meeting with an imposter. Cadarette, who wanted so desperately to help people in her law enforcement career, was being tarred with a falsified report.

    Cadarette had been set up to fail after blowing the whistle on sexual harassment and bullying by her fellow officers. She would not discover the truth for fourteen years, long after she left her job at the Ottawa Police Department.

    ?It broke me,? Cadarette stated. Dr. Ron Frey made this statement: ?This actually takes it to another level because this is probably criminal. I would think?it also has an impact not just on this particular police officer, but on the profession of psychology.?

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    https://whistleblowersblog.org/whist...rette-part-ii/

    Constable Kimberly Cadarette (Part II)
    MANIPULATED IN A VERY SINISTER WAY
    Jane TurnerbyJane Turner July 28, 2021 in Whistleblower of the Week Reading Time: 6 mins read
    Constable Kimberly Cadarette (Part II)
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    PART II

    Part I of Constable Cadarette’s story covered her childhood and her entrance into the Ottawa Police Department (OPD). Part II continues from the beginning of her employment at the Police Department in November, 2006. During her first few months with her police officer coach, Cadarette started to get anonymous and disturbing phone calls when she returned home from work. The calls usually were a male who asked her: “Oh, you are here?” or “You just got home from so and so.” Cadarette initially laughed it off in the beginning but then text messages and emails started appearing noting where she had been, and items from her home and locker started disappearing. Cadarette was concerned enough that she mentioned it to her police officer coach, and started paying more attention to the strange occurrences.

    At one point, Cadarette’s neighbor approached her and advised that they had seen three individuals. Cadarette recognized them as officers from OPD. It occurred to Cadarette that the three people were friends with her ex-boyfriend, with whom she had a very contentious relationship, and who was also a police officer.



    She met with her Staff Sergeant on her day off at Perkins restaurant in the beginning of 2007, and explained to him the strange events of missing property and phone calls. The Staff Sergeant advised her not to worry, and “just do what she was told.”

    In April of 2007, Cadarette was approached by a female Staff Sergeant who covertly looked around the locker room to see if anyone was listening, and then told Cadarette “I do not know why they are doing this to you.” This Staff Sergeant had been involved in Cadarette’s hiring process and Cadarette asked her “but if people know I am telling me the truth, why is no one standing up for me?” The Sergeant told Cadarette to go to her own Staff Sergeant, which she did. Cadarette then went further and notified an Inspector at OPD. Cadarette explained to the Inspector the anonymous text messages, emails, phone calls, missing items, and offered her phone records to the Inspector, but was rebuffed. Cadarette continued up the chain of command and went to the Chief of OPD. She divulged everything that was happening to her and included the contentious relationships with two ex-boyfriends, both police officers who may have been responsible for some of the harassment.

    Shortly after meeting with the Chief of OPD, in the summer of 2007, on one of Cadarette’s days off, she was pumping gas in her car and got a call from Zoey Colburn, who was a civilian member of OPD. Colburn told Cadarette that she worked as an assistant to the Chief of OPD. Colburn asked to meet Cadarette, which happened at a restaurant, and Cadarette was introduced to Colburn and Lorene Waters, another civilian member of OPD who worked in Human Resources. Cadarette was told by Colburn that her gun was being taken away and it was being done under the direction of the Chief. Colburn stated that, per the Chief, Cadarette had to see a psychologist and would be transferred to the front desk at OPD, without her weapon. Cadarette notes that she kept contemporaneous notes of this meeting.

    Cadarette started crying. She was not provided any paperwork and after thirty minutes left the meeting. Cadarette was still on probation at work and could be fired for any infraction, so she reported to desk duty, and reported to an address she was given for the psychologist. She was told where and when to meet the psychologist and it was always at noon in a room the size of a broom closet on the grounds of Ottawa University.

    Since the meetings were always scheduled at lunchtime, no one was in the office that housed the broom closet-size room. Cadarette kept notes in her journal about the visits. “Dr. Frey” would be in the tiny room that held two folding chairs facing each other, and “Dr. Frey” always had a laptop on his lap, recording the meeting. Cadarette found out later that the real Dr. Frey had an office in the same building, but it was not a five by ten closet that also included a hospital bed.

    The fake “Dr. Frey” asked about OPD, and Cadarette told him about the events that were occurring. According to Cadarette, she “was a mess and spewed everything” in the visits. “Dr. Frey” would arrive five minutes after Cadarette arrived, and the meetings were about an hour long, ending at 1 pm. Cadarette believes that the time was picked because there was never anyone around during the lunch hour.

    “Dr. Frey” also showed up at Cadarette’ s workplace 2 or 3 times, just staring at her, before taking the OPD elevator upstairs. The meetings were set up by Colburn. “Dr. Frey” sometimes canceled meetings at the last minute. Cadarette stated that she felt “Dr. Frey ” was always late to the meetings to make sure he did not run into anyone he knew in the building. The meetings took place in September and October of 2007. “Dr. Frey” drove a blue minivan, and had a personality that was far from warm and comforting. The fake “Dr. Frey” administered a MMPI-2, a test meant to measure a person’s psychological state, noting that he was trying to find “the possibility of paranoid personality disorder.” In administering the test, “Dr. Frey” drew out deeply personal details about Cadarette’s life. The MMPI-2 did not paint a picture of any paranoia, or psychopathology of any kind. The report did, however, paint a picture of the writer presenting himself as a psychologist who exhibited absolutely no ability to comment on any areas of psychology or ability to treat a patient.

    Cadarette met with “Dr. Frey” in the small room a total of five times, and toward the end, Cadarette felt there was something wrong with “Dr. Frey” and the room in which they met. Cadarette told her Sergeant and Colburn that she suspected something was wrong, and told them there was something funny going on with “Dr. Frey.” At the fifth meeting, Cadarette presented “Dr. Frey” with a document that explained Criminal Conversion of Impersonation with Intent (CCII). Cadarette also gave the CCII document to her superiors at OPD and to Colburn.

    After Cadarette provided “Dr. Frey” the CCII document, she never saw him again, nor Colburn. Her superiors never initiated an investigation, nor took any of the phone logs showing “Dr. Frey’s” calls. A couple of weeks later, Cadarette got approval to rejoin the force with her gun. Shortly afterwards, Cadarette started applying at other police departments and was accepted at Peel Regional Police (PRP), four hours from Ottawa in 2008. OPD sent satisfactory performance evaluations to the Peel Regional Police, and only later did Cadarette find out there was a personnel lineage between OPD and PRP.

    Throughout the following years, Cadarette was following the real Dr. Frey in the media. It was difficult because Cadarette was financially ruined, but she never stopped fighting. Work at PRP was difficult because people would refer to her as “crazy”, because she would not drop her accusations against a false psychologist in her forced Fitness for Duty exam.

    By 2019 Cadarette retained an attorney and got her medical records from her time in Ottawa and they showed no meetings with a psychologist. Cadarette had saved everything from her time at OPD including logs with her notes. Records were requested from OPD who refused to provide any records. The attorney reached out to Dr. Frey who advised he did not write or send the reports, nor was the signature his, and whoever filled out the report was committing an unethical act. The tone in the letter about Cadarette was unduly harsh, according to Dr. Frey.

    Cadarette had an opportunity to meet Dr. Frey and it was recorded and played on local television. For fifteen years, Cadarette has been telling the truth, and people have been calling her crazy. She is currently on medical leave with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Cadarette has been subjected to the cruelest form of retaliation for her allegations against bullying, and sexual harassment, the Fitness for Duty exam. What propelled the Fitness for Duty exam from cruel to evil was the fact that it was used to gaslight and harass Cadarette for over fifteen years.

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    https://whistleblowersblog.org/whist...rette-part-ii/

    Constable Kimberly Cadarette (Part II)
    MANIPULATED IN A VERY SINISTER WAY
    Jane TurnerbyJane Turner July 28, 2021 in Whistleblower of the Week Reading Time: 6 mins read
    Constable Kimberly Cadarette (Part II)
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    PART II

    Part I of Constable Cadarette?s story covered her childhood and her entrance into the Ottawa Police Department (OPD). Part II continues from the beginning of her employment at the Police Department in November, 2006. During her first few months with her police officer coach, Cadarette started to get anonymous and disturbing phone calls when she returned home from work. The calls usually were a male who asked her: ?Oh, you are here?? or ?You just got home from so and so.? Cadarette initially laughed it off in the beginning but then text messages and emails started appearing noting where she had been, and items from her home and locker started disappearing. Cadarette was concerned enough that she mentioned it to her police officer coach, and started paying more attention to the strange occurrences.

    At one point, Cadarette?s neighbor approached her and advised that they had seen three individuals. Cadarette recognized them as officers from OPD. It occurred to Cadarette that the three people were friends with her ex-boyfriend, with whom she had a very contentious relationship, and who was also a police officer.



    She met with her Staff Sergeant on her day off at Perkins restaurant in the beginning of 2007, and explained to him the strange events of missing property and phone calls. The Staff Sergeant advised her not to worry, and ?just do what she was told.?

    In April of 2007, Cadarette was approached by a female Staff Sergeant who covertly looked around the locker room to see if anyone was listening, and then told Cadarette ?I do not know why they are doing this to you.? This Staff Sergeant had been involved in Cadarette?s hiring process and Cadarette asked her ?but if people know I am telling me the truth, why is no one standing up for me?? The Sergeant told Cadarette to go to her own Staff Sergeant, which she did. Cadarette then went further and notified an Inspector at OPD. Cadarette explained to the Inspector the anonymous text messages, emails, phone calls, missing items, and offered her phone records to the Inspector, but was rebuffed. Cadarette continued up the chain of command and went to the Chief of OPD. She divulged everything that was happening to her and included the contentious relationships with two ex-boyfriends, both police officers who may have been responsible for some of the harassment.

    Shortly after meeting with the Chief of OPD, in the summer of 2007, on one of Cadarette?s days off, she was pumping gas in her car and got a call from Zoey Colburn, who was a civilian member of OPD. Colburn told Cadarette that she worked as an assistant to the Chief of OPD. Colburn asked to meet Cadarette, which happened at a restaurant, and Cadarette was introduced to Colburn and Lorene Waters, another civilian member of OPD who worked in Human Resources. Cadarette was told by Colburn that her gun was being taken away and it was being done under the direction of the Chief. Colburn stated that, per the Chief, Cadarette had to see a psychologist and would be transferred to the front desk at OPD, without her weapon. Cadarette notes that she kept contemporaneous notes of this meeting.

    Cadarette started crying. She was not provided any paperwork and after thirty minutes left the meeting. Cadarette was still on probation at work and could be fired for any infraction, so she reported to desk duty, and reported to an address she was given for the psychologist. She was told where and when to meet the psychologist and it was always at noon in a room the size of a broom closet on the grounds of Ottawa University.

    Since the meetings were always scheduled at lunchtime, no one was in the office that housed the broom closet-size room. Cadarette kept notes in her journal about the visits. ?Dr. Frey? would be in the tiny room that held two folding chairs facing each other, and ?Dr. Frey? always had a laptop on his lap, recording the meeting. Cadarette found out later that the real Dr. Frey had an office in the same building, but it was not a five by ten closet that also included a hospital bed.

    The fake ?Dr. Frey? asked about OPD, and Cadarette told him about the events that were occurring. According to Cadarette, she ?was a mess and spewed everything? in the visits. ?Dr. Frey? would arrive five minutes after Cadarette arrived, and the meetings were about an hour long, ending at 1 pm. Cadarette believes that the time was picked because there was never anyone around during the lunch hour.

    ?Dr. Frey? also showed up at Cadarette? s workplace 2 or 3 times, just staring at her, before taking the OPD elevator upstairs. The meetings were set up by Colburn. ?Dr. Frey? sometimes canceled meetings at the last minute. Cadarette stated that she felt ?Dr. Frey ? was always late to the meetings to make sure he did not run into anyone he knew in the building. The meetings took place in September and October of 2007. ?Dr. Frey? drove a blue minivan, and had a personality that was far from warm and comforting. The fake ?Dr. Frey? administered a MMPI-2, a test meant to measure a person?s psychological state, noting that he was trying to find ?the possibility of paranoid personality disorder.? In administering the test, ?Dr. Frey? drew out deeply personal details about Cadarette?s life. The MMPI-2 did not paint a picture of any paranoia, or psychopathology of any kind. The report did, however, paint a picture of the writer presenting himself as a psychologist who exhibited absolutely no ability to comment on any areas of psychology or ability to treat a patient.

    Cadarette met with ?Dr. Frey? in the small room a total of five times, and toward the end, Cadarette felt there was something wrong with ?Dr. Frey? and the room in which they met. Cadarette told her Sergeant and Colburn that she suspected something was wrong, and told them there was something funny going on with ?Dr. Frey.? At the fifth meeting, Cadarette presented ?Dr. Frey? with a document that explained Criminal Conversion of Impersonation with Intent (CCII). Cadarette also gave the CCII document to her superiors at OPD and to Colburn.

    After Cadarette provided ?Dr. Frey? the CCII document, she never saw him again, nor Colburn. Her superiors never initiated an investigation, nor took any of the phone logs showing ?Dr. Frey?s? calls. A couple of weeks later, Cadarette got approval to rejoin the force with her gun. Shortly afterwards, Cadarette started applying at other police departments and was accepted at Peel Regional Police (PRP), four hours from Ottawa in 2008. OPD sent satisfactory performance evaluations to the Peel Regional Police, and only later did Cadarette find out there was a personnel lineage between OPD and PRP.

    Throughout the following years, Cadarette was following the real Dr. Frey in the media. It was difficult because Cadarette was financially ruined, but she never stopped fighting. Work at PRP was difficult because people would refer to her as ?crazy?, because she would not drop her accusations against a false psychologist in her forced Fitness for Duty exam.

    By 2019 Cadarette retained an attorney and got her medical records from her time in Ottawa and they showed no meetings with a psychologist. Cadarette had saved everything from her time at OPD including logs with her notes. Records were requested from OPD who refused to provide any records. The attorney reached out to Dr. Frey who advised he did not write or send the reports, nor was the signature his, and whoever filled out the report was committing an unethical act. The tone in the letter about Cadarette was unduly harsh, according to Dr. Frey.

    Cadarette had an opportunity to meet Dr. Frey and it was recorded and played on local television. For fifteen years, Cadarette has been telling the truth, and people have been calling her crazy. She is currently on medical leave with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Cadarette has been subjected to the cruelest form of retaliation for her allegations against bullying, and sexual harassment, the Fitness for Duty exam. What propelled the Fitness for Duty exam from cruel to evil was the fact that it was used to gaslight and harass Cadarette for over fifteen years.

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    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottaw...%20on%20patrol.

    Police officer assessed by fake psychologist after complaining of sexual harassment

    Const. Kimberly Cadarette says she was sent to see a fake psychologist after complaining about sexual harassment while working for the Ottawa Police Service. Cadarette now works for Peel Regional Police in the Greater Toronto Area. (Judy Trinh/CBC)
    The Ottawa Police Service will launch a criminal investigation after a former officer called for a probe into what appears to be a fraudulent report by someone posing as a psychologist who was assessing her ability to work on patrol.

    Const. Kimberly Cadarette said she was ordered into therapy by OPS managers in 2007 to determine if she was fit for duty after complaining to the chief about sexual harassment and bullying by members of her platoon.

    Following that complaint, she said, she was told to visit Dr. Ron Frey, a certified psychologist, for weekly sessions at a designated time and location. Her nine-page psychological report bears Frey's electronic signature and is written on his company letterhead. Frey is a psychologist who has worked with the Department of National Defence and the RCMP.

    Frey, however, said in an interview that he did not write the report.

    Staff working with the OPS wellness program had known about the possible fraud for eight months, but there was no apparent move toward an investigation until CBC made inquiries.

    In order to verify details, CBC News arranged for the therapist and the officer to meet in person. In an astonishing moment captured on video, both Cadarette and Frey denied ever meeting face-to-face until then.

    "I don't even know what to say right now. It's ruined me," Cadarette said as she burst into tears upon realizing the man in front of her was not the therapist who treated her 14 years earlier.

    After a year and a half with the Ottawa Police Service, Cadarette transferred to Peel Regional Police in 2008. She still works with the force in the Greater Toronto Area. Cadarette believes details of the OPS fraudulent report leaked out, tainting her career.

    "We're 2021 and this happened in 2007 and to this day I'm still referred to at work as crazy and I can't be trusted. So this has never left me."

    Cadarette wants Ottawa police to find the imposter.

    The OPS said it was made aware last November of a potential fraud involving the use of the name of a doctor participating in their wellness program.

    Initially, the force had said there was no criminal investigation underway, but reversed course after CBC sent an email to Chief Peter Sloly on Tuesday inquiring about the possibility of an internal investigation.

    "We take these types of calls very seriously. A criminal investigation will be conducted on this matter and we will be speaking to all parties involved," media relations manager Carole Lavigne said in an email 2? hours after CBC's inquiry to the chief.

    Cadarette called the OPS decision to do a criminal investigation "lip service."

    "Why didn't they listen to me 15 years ago? I feel like they're just playing games," she said in an interview Tuesday night.

    "I love working with people. I love the community. I love seeing the smiles on people's faces and knowing that I've made a difference," Cadarette said as she showed photos from her first year on the job.

    Cadarette had recently broken off a long-term relationship and said she found herself becoming the target of unwanted attention from her male colleagues.


    In her diary entries from the spring of 2007, she wrote about how a staff sergeant told her he wished he wasn't married and how at least four other officers made comments about her physical appearance or inquired about her sex life.

    She said one constable accused her of having "multiple personalities" when she spurned his advances. After complaining to her supervisors, Cadarette said she was bullied at work and ostracized.

    Frustrated by a lack of action, Cadarette said she walked into the office of the chief at the time, Vern White, without an appointment.

    "I was upset. I was a mess. I told him everything."

    A few weeks later, Cadarette said, she spoke with two civilian OPS employees at a Lonestar restaurant after they asked to meet her there.

    Cadarette said the manager of health and safety and a recruiter informed her that the chief wanted her firearm to be taken away and for her to be put on desk duty until she was evaluated by a psychologist. They told Cadarette her handgun was being removed from her locker as they spoke.

    In a diary entry dated Sept. 21, 2007, Cadarette noted that she had a "first meeting with Dr. Frey recommended by the chief."

    Cadarette told CBC she expressed frustration about the decision to her colleagues.

    "I never indicated that I was going to hurt myself. And that was the big question. I said, 'I'm telling you what's going on and now you're taking my gun away. Why am I being punished?'"

    CBC has been unable to reach the two civilian supervisors that she met at the restaurant.

    White, who is now a senator, was the OPS chief from 2007 to 2012. He said he remembers Cadarette's name but does not recall meeting her in person.

    White said it's unlikely he would have asked two civilian employees to tell an officer their sidearm was being removed. He said that's the responsibility of senior officers.

    "I have never requested civilians be involved in the removal of any officer's use of force. I've never done it in 32 years of policing," said White. He also said it's the force's doctor that recommends mental health assessments, not the chief.

    Cadarette said her weekly therapy sessions were always scheduled for noon while she was on duty.

    She said she met with a man who introduced himself as Frey at a medical clinic on the University of Ottawa campus.

    She remembers that the therapist drove a dark blue minivan. Cadarette said from the first moment she set foot in the room, she was suspicious. They sat on folding chairs for their one-hour sessions.

    "He was almost like he was condescending — there was no concern from him," Cadarette said when describing his demeanour.

    In the report, the author said he would test her "level of paranoia" by unexpectedly showing up at her place of employment, intentionally filing reports later than promised and scheduling and cancelling appointments on short notice.

    Cadarette said the person she was seeing for the therapy sessions would sometimes show up at the front desk where she worked and "stand there and just stare at me."

    On her fifth appointment, Cadarette accused the psychologist of being an imposter. She said she handed him a copy of the Criminal Code section 403, which identifies impersonation of another person as identity fraud.

    Cadarette said after that confrontation, she was cleared by the therapist to return to patrol. After repeated requests to the force's health and safety division, Cadarette received a hard copy of her psychological report in late November 2007.

    Dr. Ron Frey denies writing this assessment of Cadarette. The report uses his company letterhead and his electronic signature. (Submitted by Kimberly Cadarette)
    The OPS said it will not comment on Cadarette's alleged harassment in order to respect her privacy.

    'It's distressing'
    In a recent interview, Frey was left grasping for words after reading Cadarette's mental health assessment, which bore his electronic signature.

    "It's distressing. I can't believe it's happening," said Frey, who vehemently denies writing the report. "I want to be clear that I didn't assess her."

    Frey said he would not try to trigger a patient's paranoia by showing up at their workplace for surprise visits or making last-minute cancellations.

    "That would be, first of all, atypical and highly unethical and not something that I can imagine any psychologist engaging in."

    In describing his office near the university, he said he had a window overlooking the street and a desk with plush chairs for his patients. The clinician said he has never owned a minivan.

    There are sections of the report that Frey said mirror his writing style, but he flags concerns about the tone.

    "It seems like potentially setting up an officer for failure," said Frey, who says the alleged fraud is not "completely implausible."

    In 2007, Frey said he would have mailed or faxed documents directly to the health and wellness office that was located at OPS headquarters where hundreds of employees worked. Frey says he notified Ottawa police of the alleged fraud last fall, after Cadarette's lawyers contacted him.

    "This actually takes it to another level because this is probably criminal, I would think.… It also has an impact not just on this particular police officer, but on the profession of psychology."

    CBC News has seen Cadarette's record of benefits from the health insurance company used by Ottawa police. The record shows only dental claims and no claims paid to a psychologist during her time on the force.

    "The more questions we asked, the more questions we ended up with," said Brauti. "And we came to the conclusion that she's definitely been manipulated by somebody in a very sinister way."

    "When police forces are acting properly, those investigations can be appropriate and well done. But in something like this, this definitely needs an outside body to take on the investigation."

    As for Cadarette, the meeting with Frey was both a relief and a realization of her worst fears.

    "I'm not paranoid. I'm not crazy. [Women officers] are not being heard. We're not being listened to."

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    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottaw...%20on%20patrol.

    Police officer assessed by fake psychologist after complaining of sexual harassment

    Const. Kimberly Cadarette says she was sent to see a fake psychologist after complaining about sexual harassment while working for the Ottawa Police Service. Cadarette now works for Peel Regional Police in the Greater Toronto Area. (Judy Trinh/CBC)
    The Ottawa Police Service will launch a criminal investigation after a former officer called for a probe into what appears to be a fraudulent report by someone posing as a psychologist who was assessing her ability to work on patrol.

    Const. Kimberly Cadarette said she was ordered into therapy by OPS managers in 2007 to determine if she was fit for duty after complaining to the chief about sexual harassment and bullying by members of her platoon.

    Following that complaint, she said, she was told to visit Dr. Ron Frey, a certified psychologist, for weekly sessions at a designated time and location. Her nine-page psychological report bears Frey's electronic signature and is written on his company letterhead. Frey is a psychologist who has worked with the Department of National Defence and the RCMP.

    Frey, however, said in an interview that he did not write the report.

    Staff working with the OPS wellness program had known about the possible fraud for eight months, but there was no apparent move toward an investigation until CBC made inquiries.

    In order to verify details, CBC News arranged for the therapist and the officer to meet in person. In an astonishing moment captured on video, both Cadarette and Frey denied ever meeting face-to-face until then.

    "I don't even know what to say right now. It's ruined me," Cadarette said as she burst into tears upon realizing the man in front of her was not the therapist who treated her 14 years earlier.

    After a year and a half with the Ottawa Police Service, Cadarette transferred to Peel Regional Police in 2008. She still works with the force in the Greater Toronto Area. Cadarette believes details of the OPS fraudulent report leaked out, tainting her career.

    "We're 2021 and this happened in 2007 and to this day I'm still referred to at work as crazy and I can't be trusted. So this has never left me."

    Cadarette wants Ottawa police to find the imposter.

    The OPS said it was made aware last November of a potential fraud involving the use of the name of a doctor participating in their wellness program.

    Initially, the force had said there was no criminal investigation underway, but reversed course after CBC sent an email to Chief Peter Sloly on Tuesday inquiring about the possibility of an internal investigation.

    "We take these types of calls very seriously. A criminal investigation will be conducted on this matter and we will be speaking to all parties involved," media relations manager Carole Lavigne said in an email 2? hours after CBC's inquiry to the chief.

    Cadarette called the OPS decision to do a criminal investigation "lip service."

    "Why didn't they listen to me 15 years ago? I feel like they're just playing games," she said in an interview Tuesday night.

    "I love working with people. I love the community. I love seeing the smiles on people's faces and knowing that I've made a difference," Cadarette said as she showed photos from her first year on the job.

    Cadarette had recently broken off a long-term relationship and said she found herself becoming the target of unwanted attention from her male colleagues.


    In her diary entries from the spring of 2007, she wrote about how a staff sergeant told her he wished he wasn't married and how at least four other officers made comments about her physical appearance or inquired about her sex life.

    She said one constable accused her of having "multiple personalities" when she spurned his advances. After complaining to her supervisors, Cadarette said she was bullied at work and ostracized.

    Frustrated by a lack of action, Cadarette said she walked into the office of the chief at the time, Vern White, without an appointment.

    "I was upset. I was a mess. I told him everything."

    A few weeks later, Cadarette said, she spoke with two civilian OPS employees at a Lonestar restaurant after they asked to meet her there.

    Cadarette said the manager of health and safety and a recruiter informed her that the chief wanted her firearm to be taken away and for her to be put on desk duty until she was evaluated by a psychologist. They told Cadarette her handgun was being removed from her locker as they spoke.

    In a diary entry dated Sept. 21, 2007, Cadarette noted that she had a "first meeting with Dr. Frey recommended by the chief."

    Cadarette told CBC she expressed frustration about the decision to her colleagues.

    "I never indicated that I was going to hurt myself. And that was the big question. I said, 'I'm telling you what's going on and now you're taking my gun away. Why am I being punished?'"

    CBC has been unable to reach the two civilian supervisors that she met at the restaurant.

    White, who is now a senator, was the OPS chief from 2007 to 2012. He said he remembers Cadarette's name but does not recall meeting her in person.

    White said it's unlikely he would have asked two civilian employees to tell an officer their sidearm was being removed. He said that's the responsibility of senior officers.

    "I have never requested civilians be involved in the removal of any officer's use of force. I've never done it in 32 years of policing," said White. He also said it's the force's doctor that recommends mental health assessments, not the chief.

    Cadarette said her weekly therapy sessions were always scheduled for noon while she was on duty.

    She said she met with a man who introduced himself as Frey at a medical clinic on the University of Ottawa campus.

    She remembers that the therapist drove a dark blue minivan. Cadarette said from the first moment she set foot in the room, she was suspicious. They sat on folding chairs for their one-hour sessions.

    "He was almost like he was condescending ? there was no concern from him," Cadarette said when describing his demeanour.

    In the report, the author said he would test her "level of paranoia" by unexpectedly showing up at her place of employment, intentionally filing reports later than promised and scheduling and cancelling appointments on short notice.

    Cadarette said the person she was seeing for the therapy sessions would sometimes show up at the front desk where she worked and "stand there and just stare at me."

    On her fifth appointment, Cadarette accused the psychologist of being an imposter. She said she handed him a copy of the Criminal Code section 403, which identifies impersonation of another person as identity fraud.

    Cadarette said after that confrontation, she was cleared by the therapist to return to patrol. After repeated requests to the force's health and safety division, Cadarette received a hard copy of her psychological report in late November 2007.

    Dr. Ron Frey denies writing this assessment of Cadarette. The report uses his company letterhead and his electronic signature. (Submitted by Kimberly Cadarette)
    The OPS said it will not comment on Cadarette's alleged harassment in order to respect her privacy.

    'It's distressing'
    In a recent interview, Frey was left grasping for words after reading Cadarette's mental health assessment, which bore his electronic signature.

    "It's distressing. I can't believe it's happening," said Frey, who vehemently denies writing the report. "I want to be clear that I didn't assess her."

    Frey said he would not try to trigger a patient's paranoia by showing up at their workplace for surprise visits or making last-minute cancellations.

    "That would be, first of all, atypical and highly unethical and not something that I can imagine any psychologist engaging in."

    In describing his office near the university, he said he had a window overlooking the street and a desk with plush chairs for his patients. The clinician said he has never owned a minivan.

    There are sections of the report that Frey said mirror his writing style, but he flags concerns about the tone.

    "It seems like potentially setting up an officer for failure," said Frey, who says the alleged fraud is not "completely implausible."

    In 2007, Frey said he would have mailed or faxed documents directly to the health and wellness office that was located at OPS headquarters where hundreds of employees worked. Frey says he notified Ottawa police of the alleged fraud last fall, after Cadarette's lawyers contacted him.

    "This actually takes it to another level because this is probably criminal, I would think.? It also has an impact not just on this particular police officer, but on the profession of psychology."

    CBC News has seen Cadarette's record of benefits from the health insurance company used by Ottawa police. The record shows only dental claims and no claims paid to a psychologist during her time on the force.

    "The more questions we asked, the more questions we ended up with," said Brauti. "And we came to the conclusion that she's definitely been manipulated by somebody in a very sinister way."

    "When police forces are acting properly, those investigations can be appropriate and well done. But in something like this, this definitely needs an outside body to take on the investigation."

    As for Cadarette, the meeting with Frey was both a relief and a realization of her worst fears.

    "I'm not paranoid. I'm not crazy. [Women officers] are not being heard. We're not being listened to."

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