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Thread: Adopted woman's DNA reveals her dad is wanted for murdering his family in Maryland in 1976

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    Adopted woman's DNA reveals her dad is wanted for murdering his family in Maryland in 1976

    https://mynbc15.com/news/nation-worl...ryland-in-1976

    BETHESDA (WJLA) ? 23andMe DNA tests have provided a lot of information to people about their heritage since they became popular a few years ago.

    For one woman in North Carolina, who was looking to learn more about her biological family after being adopted at birth, a test revealed that her father is on the FBI's Most Wanted list for the alleged murder of his entire family in Bethesda more than 40 years ago.

    WECT reports that Kathy Gillcrist's test first matched her with a third cousin, Susan Gillmor, who happens to be a genealogist.

    Gillmor was able to help Gillcrest deduce that her father is William Bradford Bishop, Jr., who the FBI says bludgeoned his wife, mother, and three sons to death on March 1, 1976, then transported their bodies to Columbia, North Carolina, where he buried them in a shallow grave and lit them on fire.

    If Bishop is still alive today, he is 84 years old.

    The FBI describes him like this:

    "Bishop was, and may still be, an avid outdoorsman, camper, and hiker. He had extensive camping experience in Africa. He also enjoyed canoeing, fishing, swimming, jogging, tennis, skiing and riding motorcycles. Bishop enjoyed working out several times a week. He was also a licensed amateur pilot who learned to fly in Botswana, Africa.

    Bishop has an American Studies degree from Yale University and a Master's Degree in Italian from Middlebury College in Vermont. He was known to read extensively and may have kept a diary or journal. A longtime insomniac, Bishop reportedly had been under psychiatric care in the past and had used medication for depression. He drank scotch and wine and enjoyed eating peanuts and spicy food.

    Bishop was described as intense and self-absorbed, prone to violent outbursts, and preferred a neat and orderly environment."
    Last edited by up2trouble; 03-06-2021 at 04:04 PM.

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    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    I can't imagine how it would feel to find this out from your DNA test. I have such mixed feelings about these DNA tests in general.

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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    I can't imagine how it would feel to find this out from your DNA test. I have such mixed feelings about these DNA tests in general.
    When I did 23andme, I opted out of a lot of the sharing stuff. I posted on FB what I was doing in case there were any family secrets that I missed so my cousins were forewarned.

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    Senior Member Words Words's Avatar
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    I know adoptions are usually closed but I would assume they'd open it for this? Was she born after this happened? did her mom know what kinda man he was so she didn't want to keep it, or was she conceived in not so friendly conditions?

    I've always wanted to do that kind of thing, but also not...I know who my dad is but he wasn't in my life much after young childhood, and honestly nothing would surprise me in his family but at the same time I don't know if I'd want to actually know.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Words Words View Post
    I know adoptions are usually closed but I would assume they'd open it for this? Was she born after this happened? did her mom know what kinda man he was so she didn't want to keep it, or was she conceived in not so friendly conditions?

    I've always wanted to do that kind of thing, but also not...I know who my dad is but he wasn't in my life much after young childhood, and honestly nothing would surprise me in his family but at the same time I don't know if I'd want to actually know.
    I was curious about it too. I did some searching and she was born before the kids he killed. I think she was 18 when this happened. Her Mom was like 17 when she had her and had more kids afterwards ... all were given up for adoption. I don't know if he even knew about her.

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    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by up2trouble View Post
    When I did 23andme, I opted out of a lot of the sharing stuff. I posted on FB what I was doing in case there were any family secrets that I missed so my cousins were forewarned.
    Quote Originally Posted by Words Words View Post
    I know adoptions are usually closed but I would assume they'd open it for this? Was she born after this happened? did her mom know what kinda man he was so she didn't want to keep it, or was she conceived in not so friendly conditions?

    I've always wanted to do that kind of thing, but also not...I know who my dad is but he wasn't in my life much after young childhood, and honestly nothing would surprise me in his family but at the same time I don't know if I'd want to actually know.
    Theres a slight chance my dad isn't my dad. When I was 11 I was snooping around and found some letters between my mom and another man (no idea who he was, but he wasn't my 'dad') and the time would be right for my birth. Also, I am the odd one out between my blond brother and sister (even with our Native American mother) and look differently, and was always the black sheep of the family. Who knows.

    I'm not willing to put my DNA out there for every corporation or person wanting to see it though. Our laws have not caught up with the current move for everyone doing DNA. Even if you opt to be anonymous on the results, it's not anonymous in their system and I fear it being used to discriminate for health and other reasons.

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    Senior Citizen Nomad's Avatar
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    I did the Ancestry DNA thing because I was adopted and I wanted to know mynationality. I had a bet going with my father - he said I was probably Scandinavian and I told him my money was on European (England, specifically).

    I was right. I'm English, Scottish and Irish.

    I've also found my birth parents and six siblings. And a crapload of nieces and nephews. Quite a bit for someone who was raised as an only child to take in.
    "A vagabond dreamer, a rhymer and singer of songs
    Singing to no one and nowhere to really belong." - Waylon Jennings

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    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nomad View Post
    I did the Ancestry DNA thing because I was adopted and I wanted to know mynationality. I had a bet going with my father - he said I was probably Scandinavian and I told him my money was on European (England, specifically).

    I was right. I'm English, Scottish and Irish.

    I've also found my birth parents and six siblings. And a crapload of nieces and nephews. Quite a bit for someone who was raised as an only child to take in.
    Did you reach out to them? If so, did it go well?

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    Senior Citizen Nomad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Did you reach out to them? If so, did it go well?
    Oh, yeah. I've talked to almost all of them many times. I met two of my sisters, too! It's gone really well so far.
    "A vagabond dreamer, a rhymer and singer of songs
    Singing to no one and nowhere to really belong." - Waylon Jennings

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    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nomad View Post
    Oh, yeah. I've talked to almost all of them many times. I met two of my sisters, too! It's gone really well so far.
    I'm glad it's gone well! I wonder about how I would feel if I did found out I had another family and whether I would reach out to them.

    The whole DNA thing has also been a huge thing for my pet UID cases, I'm really happy that so many people are getting their names back.

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    Moderator puzzld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    I'm glad it's gone well! I wonder about how I would feel if I did found out I had another family and whether I would reach out to them.

    The whole DNA thing has also been a huge thing for my pet UID cases, I'm really happy that so many people are getting their names back.
    This. It gives the family a bit of closure, fwiw, it maybe gets a killer off of the streets. So from that standpoint... yes it's a godsend. It may remove suspicion from innocent people, also good. I understand the worries about the downsides.

    Some cousins of mine have spent an entire lifetime looking for a great uncle who "just disappeared" in the 30's. Answers would have been a blessing to them and there parents and grandparents. I have a great grandma who was adopted, and I'd love to know who her people were, but... I've had that kit sitting there waiting to be sent in for a long time and I just haven't done anything with it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by up2trouble View Post
    https://mynbc15.com/news/nation-worl...ryland-in-1976

    BETHESDA (WJLA) ? 23andMe DNA tests have provided a lot of information to people about their heritage since they became popular a few years ago.

    For one woman in North Carolina, who was looking to learn more about her biological family after being adopted at birth, a test revealed that her father is on the FBI's Most Wanted list for the alleged murder of his entire family in Bethesda more than 40 years ago.

    WECT reports that Kathy Gillcrist's test first matched her with a third cousin, Susan Gillmor, who happens to be a genealogist.

    Gillmor was able to help Gillcrest deduce that her father is William Bradford Bishop, Jr., who the FBI says bludgeoned his wife, mother, and three sons to death on March 1, 1976, then transported their bodies to Columbia, North Carolina, where he buried them in a shallow grave and lit them on fire.

    If Bishop is still alive today, he is 84 years old.

    The FBI describes him like this:

    "Bishop was, and may still be, an avid outdoorsman, camper, and hiker. He had extensive camping experience in Africa. He also enjoyed canoeing, fishing, swimming, jogging, tennis, skiing and riding motorcycles. Bishop enjoyed working out several times a week. He was also a licensed amateur pilot who learned to fly in Botswana, Africa.

    Bishop has an American Studies degree from Yale University and a Master's Degree in Italian from Middlebury College in Vermont. He was known to read extensively and may have kept a diary or journal. A longtime insomniac, Bishop reportedly had been under psychiatric care in the past and had used medication for depression. He drank scotch and wine and enjoyed eating peanuts and spicy food.

    Bishop was described as intense and self-absorbed, prone to violent outbursts, and preferred a neat and orderly environment."
    Sad to see her put in a mixed situation though given that on one hand she help solve a murder and on the other hand find out that her dad was the killer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nomad View Post
    I did the Ancestry DNA thing because I was adopted and I wanted to know mynationality. I had a bet going with my father - he said I was probably Scandinavian and I told him my money was on European (England, specifically).

    I was right. I'm English, Scottish and Irish.

    I've also found my birth parents and six siblings. And a crapload of nieces and nephews. Quite a bit for someone who was raised as an only child to take in.
    Are they your half siblings?

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Theres a slight chance my dad isn't my dad. When I was 11 I was snooping around and found some letters between my mom and another man (no idea who he was, but he wasn't my 'dad') and the time would be right for my birth. Also, I am the odd one out between my blond brother and sister (even with our Native American mother) and look differently, and was always the black sheep of the family. Who knows.

    I'm not willing to put my DNA out there for every corporation or person wanting to see it though. Our laws have not caught up with the current move for everyone doing DNA. Even if you opt to be anonymous on the results, it's not anonymous in their system and I fear it being used to discriminate for health and other reasons.
    Just curious what you're concerned about. Discriminate?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nomad View Post
    Oh, yeah. I've talked to almost all of them many times. I met two of my sisters, too! It's gone really well so far.
    I didn't know you were adopted. That's so cool that you got to connect with some peeps!


    Quote Originally Posted by marakisses View Post
    yes i said i will leave it under you storage he said cuddle with me i said shut up it over??? what am i doing wrong??

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron_NYC View Post
    Just curious what you're concerned about. Discriminate?
    You're joking, right? I'll link the articles below because it's too long but first of all there is health discrimination concerns. There was this guy you might have heard of, his name was Trump, and he wanted to get rid of Obamacare. If we do these tests and they find some genetic health flaw, and they get rid of the pre-existing condition clause in the future, all this info if out there and you know insurance companies would jump right on it to deny insurance or raise the prices hugely.

    Then, while it can be good it isn't foolproof, the familial DNA thing has fingered innocent people a few times. If it won't let you read due to subscription google the Angie Dodge case. This innocent guy was rooked into this case on the basis of familial DNA.

    https://www.nola.com/article_d58a3d1...19719f6f0.html
    New Orleans filmmaker cleared in cold-case murder; false positive highlights limitations of familial DNA searching

    Also, since I know how much you like him...are you going to become the new Saleen and follow me around and question me in every thread?

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    https://www.cnbc.com/2018/06/16/5-bi...companies.html
    5 biggest risks of sharing your DNA with consumer genetic-testing companies

    Some individuals worry they will discover things about their DNA that will be frightening — namely, the risks they run of contracting various diseases — and not know how to move forward with the information. Professional scientific skeptics contend the information may not even be as accurate as claimed, and lead people to make questionable health decisions. But there’s another type of risk that consumers aren’t focusing on as much, and it’s a big one: privacy. There is nothing more private than your personal genetic information, and sending away for a personal genome kit means sharing your DNA with the testing companies. What do they do with it, beyond providing consumers with genetic and health assessments?

    1. Hacking
    Obviously, this is not a risk that the genetic-testing industry alone faces, but it is an industry that has a unique set of information on its consumers. And there was a recent hack in the space. More than 92 million accounts from the genealogy and DNA testing service MyHeritage were found on a private server, the company announced earlier this month. DNA data, specifically, was not breached, the company said. But a hack in this space is a concern, regardless.

    “Protecting customer data remains Ancestry’s highest priority,” a spokeswoman for the company said. “We have invested heavily in building strong data security, and we make ongoing investments to continuously strengthen our security measures.”
    2. Who may profit on your DNA? The answer: Not you

    One of the most compelling signs that consumers have a positive view of these companies is that a majority agree to let them share DNA with researcher partners. All of these companies make clear that they will not share your DNA with any third-party unless you explicitly consent to it, but as 23andMe data shows, the vast majority of consumers opt in — at 23andMe, more than 80 percent. Ancestry and Veritas do not provide data on the opt-in percentage.

    23andMe provides consumers the choice of opting into research conducted on behalf of academic, nonprofit and industry organizations. They also offer an option to consent separately to specific disease studies in which their DNA is used in conjunction with for-profit drug companies, such as the Parkinson’s disease research conducted with Genentech and the lupus and IBD research conducted with Pfizer.

    “If customers don’t consent, none of their data is shared,” a 23andMe spokeswoman said.

    Consumers seem to have made the decision that altruism is the proper course of action: If their DNA can help find a cause of, or cure for, a disease, they want to be part of that process. But it also means that one day a drug company may be bringing a drug to market based, in part, on your DNA.

    “People do think they are helping the world, helping society, even though they may not as an individual benefit,” King said. “But if your DNA helps develop a drug for a pharmaceutical company, there is nothing governing what they do. It could be a drug they sell at a high profit but doesn’t help the world become a better place.”

    Veritas Genetics CEO Mirza Cifric said what it learns from research becomes immediately available to consumers through updates to their own genome or publication that moves science forward. “Our primary interest is unlocking secrets that exist in the genome, not engaging pharmaceutical companies to develop drugs, although we see potential value in that,” Cifric said.

    Marcy Darnovsky, executive director at the Center for Genetics and Society, said this research process also means that data is shared with and passes through many partners, and in her opinion, no matter what the testing companies say, they can’t ensure what those partners are doing with your DNA.

    An Ancestry spokeswoman noted that the decision to share DNA for research is not irrevocable, and consumers can request to revoke that permission at any time through their account settings. But King isn’t convinced: “Quitting one of these services isn’t as simple as just clicking Delete. How do you verify that they’ve actually deleted your genetic profile or destroyed a physical sample?”
    3. Laws covering genetic privacy not broad enough, experts say.

    Many privacy experts are concerned that the only law currently covering genetic privacy, the Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act (also known as GINA) is too narrow in its focus on banning employers or insurance companies from accessing this information. Other than GINA, there really is nothing, King said.

    There are some select groups of Americans who receive insurance from the government that results in them not being covered by GINA: individuals who receive their insurance through the Federal Employees Health Benefits, the Veterans Health Administration, the U.S. Military (TRICARE), and the Indian Health Service. However, some of these programs have internal policies that prohibit or restrict genetic discrimination, such as The Office of Personnel Management (which oversees FEHB) and U.S. Military’s TRICARE insurance program.

    The genetic information space is in many respects still uncharted legislative territory, and consumers are taking these companies at their word, and they do state that protecting customers’ privacy is their highest priority. Ancestry reminds customers that “you own your data and you always maintain ownership of it,” and “you may request that we delete your data or account at any time.”

    Why might a lack of strict legislation come back to haunt consumers? Keep reading.
    4. Law enforcement knows these companies have your DNA, and they may want it. They’re already asking.

    Requests from law enforcement and courts for your data are already happening and also can be done under subpoena.

    Remember the Golden State Killer case that was recently cracked after decades? It was cracked with the help of DNA from a genealogy company. Catching a murderer is a good thing, but the ability of law enforcement to target your DNA through these testing companies is a big issue.

    Darnovsky noted that in the Golden State Killer case, law enforcement found their way to the suspect by using DNA from relatives. She said there is a lesson in this for consumers. “When you provide your genetic information to a DNA testing company, you are also providing information about those related to you — including distant cousins. When your relatives, including distant ones whom you may not even know, provide their DNA, they are also providing genetic information about you.”

    She also noted that while testing companies stress that DNA data is “de-identified” to protect privacy, data shared with researchers can be re-identified in many cases.

    Requests may also come from the federal government, including the State Department or U.S. Military. King said it is much more likely the federal government will want this DNA data for law enforcement purposes rather than to exploit any employer-employee loophole in GINA.

    All of these DNA testing companies explain this in their privacy statements, and 23andMe makes clear that it stands on the side of consumers. It says it will “resist” efforts of law enforcement.

    “Under certain circumstances, personal information may be subject to disclosure pursuant to judicial or other government subpoenas, warrants or orders, or in coordination with regulatory authorities. However, we use all practical legal and administrative resources to resist such requests.

    23andMe provides a transparency report on all requests made by law enforcement and government to date. Ancestry provides a similar report.

    King said that law enforcement has barely begun to test the power of the subpoena in this area, if at all, and so it’s really uncharted territory in the legal realm. But she said there is every reason to believe the companies will defend consumers in a manner similar to how Apple has fought government requests to unlock and unencrypt iPhones.

    “I think most companies approach this question from the judgment of, How much do we have to gain by violating our users’ trust? vs. How much do we have to lose by not cooperating with law enforcement?” King said. She added, “Tech companies (and potentially direct-to-consumer genetic-testing companies) tend to fight requests from law enforcement and force them to go through a legal process (formally getting a subpoena); on rare exceptions they will fight to quash those. I’m sure the DTCGT are all watching these recent cases of law enforcement uploading suspect samples directly to open DNA databases very, very carefully, especially how the public reacts. I actually doubt that many of them are going to be willing to cooperate with informal law-enforcement requests.”

    Darnovsky noted that in addition to civil liberty issues, there may be a racial component to be concerned about: “There’s great concern in the law-enforcement context both about civil liberties in general and about disproportionate impact on communities of color, because they are already disproportionately in contact with police.”

    23andMe has itself noted that the genetic testing industry remains challenged by a lack of diversity, and King said, “To the extent that poverty/low income is intertwined with the criminal justice system ... a focus on using these databases to identify criminals will create unease or distrust, especially among historically targeted populations,” King said.

    Continued below

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    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    continued from above

    5. The company’s situation — or privacy statement — can change.

    Unintended consequences — not just acute incidents like hacking — are also inherent in this business model’s risks.

    Companies change — they are bought, sold and go out of business — and what happens to your data then? Darnovsky asked.

    In the current tech-sector regulatory landscape, privacy statements also change.

    “There are no limits on what these companies can do; they just have to state it in their privacy policies, which they can change at any time (though you may have to consent to it again),” King said.

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    Senior Citizen Nomad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    Are they your half siblings?
    Yup. Birth mom had an affair of which I was the result. She had two daughters at that time. Then a son after me.

    Birth dad had 4 kids. So, my count was wrong - I have 7 half-siblings. I've only met two in person - the half sisters on my birth mom's side. Apparently they've been looking for me since they were teenagers and found out that I existed. Haha.

    Funny thing is, a girl I knew in high school who dated a couple of my friends (and eventually married one) is my first cousin.
    "A vagabond dreamer, a rhymer and singer of songs
    Singing to no one and nowhere to really belong." - Waylon Jennings

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    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nomad View Post
    Yup. Birth mom had an affair of which I was the result. She had two daughters at that time. Then a son after me.

    Birth dad had 4 kids. So, my count was wrong - I have 7 half-siblings. I've only met two in person - the half sisters on my birth mom's side. Apparently they've been looking for me since they were teenagers and found out that I existed. Haha.

    Funny thing is, a girl I knew in high school who dated a couple of my friends (and eventually married one) is my first cousin.
    That's trippy! This is the concern with adoption...what if you had dated and married, her, lol? I've heard of several cases where something like that happened.

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