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    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    Anybody remember the old Geocities, Angelfire and Tripod blogs/ Note Geocities style of Internet is back this time as Neocities

    https://neocities.org/

    Note if you see my byline https://bioinformaticsproject.neocities.org/ I am the lead person for this site.

    Its a web hosting site where there are web pages made by web site artists that give some cool graphics of web pages that resemble the early 2000's. I remember back in the early 2000's we used to explore the web from people who had accounts from Geocities, Angelfire and Tripod for artistic reasons and other tacky reasons.


    https://www.wired.com/2013/07/neocities/


    GEOCITIES, THE OLD free web hosting site from the 1990s, was amazingly ahead of its time. It did obsessiveness before Tumblr, self-infatuation before Facebook, and sorry Reddit, GeoCities straight-up ruled at GIFs. It wasn't often pretty, but it was always interesting. But then Yahoo bought GeoCities, proceeded to run it into the ground, and eventually shut it down everywhere other than Japan. Today, a new venture wants to bring it, or at least its culture, back.

    NeoCities is a new hosting service, launched June 28, that gives users 10 megabytes of free space along with a basic HTML editor to create a website. To create a site, people will need to learn rudimentary HTML--just as they did with GeoCities. Developer Kyle Drake acknowledges that this isn't for everyone, but thinks there needs to be an alternative to the current pre-formatted, template-driven, standardizing platforms, which make it easy to have a web presence, but hard to make that presence your own. ?If you look at sites like Facebook," he says, "they control the type, shape, and arrangement of the content you contribute, and deviation is not possible.?

    Basically, Drake hopes people will use it to make the Web more interesting. The beauty of NeoCities, says Drake, is that it bucks the "collective mentality that you can't make real sites without complicated back-end servers." Although he chose the size limit to keep things affordable, he says "it was also a suggestion that you can do a lot with a small amount of space."

    That's true. For example, Wired's homepage clocks in at a mere 3.5 megabytes. And, thanks to CSS, web design is also exponentially more flexible than it was in GeoCities' era. So despite the paltry 10 megabyte limit (GeoCities gave away 11 megabytes in 1997), a NeoCities page can host beautiful, intelligent, and, well, downright weird content. So much for dancing babies.

    Drake thinks this combination of the old web's spirit and the new web's maturity will encourage users to let their freak flags fly. He's aware that tying his project to GeoCities might cause it to collapse under the weight of nostalgia, or worse, drown in a flood of irony. But, he's hopeful that people will see his project's real potential and actually make cool sites.

    What will you do with your 10 megabytes of free space? Show us in the comments below. And in case you're stumped, here are some to put up while you figure things out.
    https://www.vice.com/en/article/d77m...y-of-geocities

    With 90s nostalgia at full throttle, it's no surprise to see the recent launch of NeoCities, a rebirth of the Dot Com-era web hosting platform Geocities, in all its flashy, neon, blinking, clip art-filled wonder.

    But NeoCities aims to be something bigger than fuck-yeah-90s retro. According to its creator Kyle Drake, a software engineer and self-proclaimed "professional cyberpunk," the project is a way to recreate not only the aesthetic of the early personal websites, but also the original mission of Geocities: to give anyone with internet access a free place on the web.

    "My goal with NeoCities is not to turn it into a GeoCities parody site, though I don't really care if people use it that way,? he wrote in an introductory blog post. ?It's to rebuild the platform for us to be able to be creative again. To have sites that we can do whatever we want with. This is not nostalgia speaking. We really did lose our platforms for creativity and rich self expression online, and I want to help bring them back."

    The way Drake sees it, today's internet culture is one of consumption, not creation. Sure, websites are now interactive, dynamic, highly functional, user-friendly and hypersocial. But at what cost? The web has become homogenous, controlled, even monitored?a "sad, pathetic digital iron curtain."

    So NeoCities is a platform to simplify creation. Users get 10 MB of free webpage hosting and a bare bones interface to build from, with just HTML and images. The goal is to be as uncensored, anonymous and open as possible. (Though uncensored may be a pipe dream; already the fuckthensa.neocities.org domain has been seized.)

    In its first week, 1,600 sites were created?some straight 90s throwback, some delightfully random, some just ugly as hell.

    In a way, it?s fitting that here at the end of Web. 2.0 era, we?re reclaiming the spirit that pioneered the age of user-generated content. Geocities was the first real outlet for personal expression online?introducing the then-novel idea of putting things on the web, not just getting information from it. (For a trip down the retro web rabbit hole, check out archive sites Oocities or Reocities.)

    It was this means of self-expression that propelled GeoCities to the third most visited website by the end of the decade, with 38 million user-built pages, and compelled Yahoo! to buy it in 1999 for a ridiculous $3.57 billion in Dot Com-bubble stock.

    Though it?s easy to blame Yahoo! for Geocities's subsequent demise, it may have been inevitable. With no social element, even the most awesome sites were lost in the internet ether, and hence when MySpace came along and added friends to the equation, it was the end of Geocities and the real start of Web 2.0.

    Who cares if it?s ugly, as long as it?s original? With NeoCities, Drake hopes we'll come full circle, and revive the web as a truly democratic platform. Considering the backlash Facebook and Google are getting of late?and the anxiety around Yahoo!'s recent acquisition of Tumblr (sound familiar?)?maybe netizens will flock to NeoCities as an alterative after all.





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  3. #3
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    https://www.mic.com/p/how-geocities-...place-19638198


    Believe it or not, the internet used to feel a lot cozier. In the early days of the World Wide Web, as many of us called it back then, going online was like exploring the Wild West. In those days, seeking out the content you wanted online wasn't exactly simple. Before Google's debut in the late '90s, much of what we uncovered during our online dalliances were the product of sifting through hosts like GeoCities or Tripod pages. Sure, we had early search engines like AltaVista, Yahoo, Lycos, or even Excite back then, but they weren't nearly as reliable or functional as what we're used to today. In truth, navigating the internet was sometimes an exercise in futility, unless you were willing to simply explore.

    Call me crazy, but that's exactly what I miss about the internet. Fast forward to the 2000s, and everything — especially in the past decade or so — has become so compartmentalized. It often feels like there's nothing left to discover online, so we're left with scrolling through Instagram and Facebook feeds for entertainment. That's why there's one relic of the internet's past I still yearn for: webrings. I'm still mourning their untimely death. And while I know it was ultimately for the better in terms of efficiency and better search efficacy in the end, I still find myself missing them.

    Webrings are a forgotten antiquity of the past, a solution created to resolve a problem that no longer exists. They were were initially conceived as a way to help connect websites and other content that centered around specific topics to help web surfers find what they were looking for. They usually appeared at the bottom of a website to serve as a waypoint for individuals seeking out similar websites surrounding a theme.


    For instance, say you were looking for Calvin & Hobbes content. You'd visit the homepage for a webring about the comic, or somehow stumble upon one of the members' pages. From there, you could scroll down to the bottom of the site (or find the webring on the page wherever it was embedded) and click one of several navigation buttons: Previous, Next, Random, etc.

    You could opt to skip over the previous site or next site in the ring, see the next 5 sites in the rotation, or even see the entire list of webring members. This made it incredibly easy to continue browsing through content about one particular thing — because otherwise it would have been quite difficult to surf the same themed websites, save for links on connected pages.

    Webrings were usually owned by one person or a group of people, who would add new sites to the ring and separate the higher-quality destinations from spam. If you were a webmaster, you could submit your own website for approval, and if you happened to be added, you could add a special webring box to your own page. More than just a novel way to browse the internet, webrings felt like an exclusive club and a way to filter the type of content you'd see out of the massive amount of content found online.

    While it may seem as though I'm simply longing for a more complicated time, webrings actually made browsing aimlessly online a lot more fun. The internet at that point felt like a giant mystery. Every click could lead you down another rabbit hole. You could end up seeking out the name of a Sailor Moon voice actress on one fan site, then come out of your browsing session having found a new character-centric "shrine" you absolutely loved by the end. Remember that, at this point in time, databases like IMDB simply didn't exist yet.

    It was like embarking on a discovery-centric trek that opened up additional parts of the internet you may not have seen otherwise, all wrapped up neatly for you in a small, heavily-artifacted .JPG image map.

    There were webrings for just about everything, too. If you had a favorite actor, you could join a group of like-minded creators and fans online and get to know them through the pages they created. That means you could potentially even make friends and reach outside of your comfort zone by chatting with the creators of some of your favorite sites. There was a sense of camaraderie and community between web designers back then, and everyone felt only just an email away. The internet as a whole just felt more tight-knit.

    Using webrings was, like many other aspects of early internet life, a method that early online denizens used to try and map out the massive, unexplored frontier that was the Web. It was a way to make sense of this exciting new technology that no one was quite sure about just yet — and it brought people together.

    These days, it feels as though our online destinations are pre-ordained. If you want to find something specific, you just search for it (using Google, natch). You can start clicking around once you find it, but there isn't any care taken to compile online destinations and categorize them anymore. If there are steps taken to personalize and offer tailored recommendations for users, it comes by way of algorithms that platforms like Facebook or Instagram employ. Unfortunately, most methods used today lack a human touch.

    But that's a necessary evil, considering how much the internet has grown over the years. The internet is a much more massive playground than it was in the late '90s. The amount of data online is nearly limitless. To try and compile some sort of list of content that interlinks with each other as well as maintain a relationship with the owners of each website seems like such a fool's errand now.

    The same feeling of togetherness, that sense of belonging to something special that came along with joining or running a webring, has been missing from the modern internet for years. Seeing these classic images of simplistic, Web 1.0 webring designs always takes me back to a time when the internet was hardly sinister, but an exciting new tool that everyone wanted to use and be a part of.

    It hits me in the same way watching a favorite movie from childhood does, or hearing a classic song. The internet will never be this simple again — not in the age of SEO, clickbait, paid advertisements, or other practices the internet has birthed. But as long as we can look back on constructs like webrings, there's always a place of familiarity to go back to and appreciate about the internet's infancy.

    Personally, I'll always look back fondly upon the day I was accepted into the "Sailor Scouts Webring," which collected individual sites based on Sailor Moon characters. There were exclusive spots for each Sailor Scout, from Sailor Moon to Sailor Saturn. My hastily made creation, all about Sailor Neptune, was cobbled together in Dreamweaver and half of its sections were under construction. But I proudly accepted my place in the webring. My hit counter never went up much after that, but I was so excited to be a part of something bigger than me online. I don't know if I've ever felt that proud again.

    It's highly doubtful we'll ever find an analogue for webrings or anything like them in this day and age, but it's always fun to reflect and remember so that we can appreciate how far we've come.


  4. #4
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.mic.com/p/how-geocities-...place-19638198


    Believe it or not, the internet used to feel a lot cozier. In the early days of the World Wide Web, as many of us called it back then, going online was like exploring the Wild West. In those days, seeking out the content you wanted online wasn't exactly simple. Before Google's debut in the late '90s, much of what we uncovered during our online dalliances were the product of sifting through hosts like GeoCities or Tripod pages. Sure, we had early search engines like AltaVista, Yahoo, Lycos, or even Excite back then, but they weren't nearly as reliable or functional as what we're used to today. In truth, navigating the internet was sometimes an exercise in futility, unless you were willing to simply explore.

    Call me crazy, but that's exactly what I miss about the internet. Fast forward to the 2000s, and everything ? especially in the past decade or so ? has become so compartmentalized. It often feels like there's nothing left to discover online, so we're left with scrolling through Instagram and Facebook feeds for entertainment. That's why there's one relic of the internet's past I still yearn for: webrings. I'm still mourning their untimely death. And while I know it was ultimately for the better in terms of efficiency and better search efficacy in the end, I still find myself missing them.

    Webrings are a forgotten antiquity of the past, a solution created to resolve a problem that no longer exists. They were were initially conceived as a way to help connect websites and other content that centered around specific topics to help web surfers find what they were looking for. They usually appeared at the bottom of a website to serve as a waypoint for individuals seeking out similar websites surrounding a theme.


    For instance, say you were looking for Calvin & Hobbes content. You'd visit the homepage for a webring about the comic, or somehow stumble upon one of the members' pages. From there, you could scroll down to the bottom of the site (or find the webring on the page wherever it was embedded) and click one of several navigation buttons: Previous, Next, Random, etc.

    You could opt to skip over the previous site or next site in the ring, see the next 5 sites in the rotation, or even see the entire list of webring members. This made it incredibly easy to continue browsing through content about one particular thing ? because otherwise it would have been quite difficult to surf the same themed websites, save for links on connected pages.

    Webrings were usually owned by one person or a group of people, who would add new sites to the ring and separate the higher-quality destinations from spam. If you were a webmaster, you could submit your own website for approval, and if you happened to be added, you could add a special webring box to your own page. More than just a novel way to browse the internet, webrings felt like an exclusive club and a way to filter the type of content you'd see out of the massive amount of content found online.

    While it may seem as though I'm simply longing for a more complicated time, webrings actually made browsing aimlessly online a lot more fun. The internet at that point felt like a giant mystery. Every click could lead you down another rabbit hole. You could end up seeking out the name of a Sailor Moon voice actress on one fan site, then come out of your browsing session having found a new character-centric "shrine" you absolutely loved by the end. Remember that, at this point in time, databases like IMDB simply didn't exist yet.

    It was like embarking on a discovery-centric trek that opened up additional parts of the internet you may not have seen otherwise, all wrapped up neatly for you in a small, heavily-artifacted .JPG image map.

    There were webrings for just about everything, too. If you had a favorite actor, you could join a group of like-minded creators and fans online and get to know them through the pages they created. That means you could potentially even make friends and reach outside of your comfort zone by chatting with the creators of some of your favorite sites. There was a sense of camaraderie and community between web designers back then, and everyone felt only just an email away. The internet as a whole just felt more tight-knit.

    Using webrings was, like many other aspects of early internet life, a method that early online denizens used to try and map out the massive, unexplored frontier that was the Web. It was a way to make sense of this exciting new technology that no one was quite sure about just yet ? and it brought people together.

    These days, it feels as though our online destinations are pre-ordained. If you want to find something specific, you just search for it (using Google, natch). You can start clicking around once you find it, but there isn't any care taken to compile online destinations and categorize them anymore. If there are steps taken to personalize and offer tailored recommendations for users, it comes by way of algorithms that platforms like Facebook or Instagram employ. Unfortunately, most methods used today lack a human touch.

    But that's a necessary evil, considering how much the internet has grown over the years. The internet is a much more massive playground than it was in the late '90s. The amount of data online is nearly limitless. To try and compile some sort of list of content that interlinks with each other as well as maintain a relationship with the owners of each website seems like such a fool's errand now.

    The same feeling of togetherness, that sense of belonging to something special that came along with joining or running a webring, has been missing from the modern internet for years. Seeing these classic images of simplistic, Web 1.0 webring designs always takes me back to a time when the internet was hardly sinister, but an exciting new tool that everyone wanted to use and be a part of.

    It hits me in the same way watching a favorite movie from childhood does, or hearing a classic song. The internet will never be this simple again ? not in the age of SEO, clickbait, paid advertisements, or other practices the internet has birthed. But as long as we can look back on constructs like webrings, there's always a place of familiarity to go back to and appreciate about the internet's infancy.

    Personally, I'll always look back fondly upon the day I was accepted into the "Sailor Scouts Webring," which collected individual sites based on Sailor Moon characters. There were exclusive spots for each Sailor Scout, from Sailor Moon to Sailor Saturn. My hastily made creation, all about Sailor Neptune, was cobbled together in Dreamweaver and half of its sections were under construction. But I proudly accepted my place in the webring. My hit counter never went up much after that, but I was so excited to be a part of something bigger than me online. I don't know if I've ever felt that proud again.

    It's highly doubtful we'll ever find an analogue for webrings or anything like them in this day and age, but it's always fun to reflect and remember so that we can appreciate how far we've come.


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    https://www.theverge.com/2013/4/3/41...angelfire-page

    Nice At least Mark Zuckerberg's Angelfire page is ages better than facebook.

    The sleuths at Hacker News appear to have uncovered a relic from the dusty ruins of the '90s web: Mark Zuckerberg's Angelfire webpage. While we can't confirm that the site actually belongs to Facebook's Zuckerberg, the evidence is compelling: the social network magnate spells his full name out in the page's source code, and invites guests to check out his "Zuck Fader," a newer version of his "Vader Fader" color gradient tool.

    "HI, MY NAME IS SLIM SHADY."

    If "Mark's" first profile is to be trusted, the king of social networking can be accused of ripping off more than Facebook's concept. "Hi, my name is... Slim Shady," Mark writes. "No, really, my name is Slim Shady. Just kidding, my name is Mark." Mark lives in a small town "near the massive city of New York." He's 15 years old and just finished freshman year in high school. (A quick visit to the Internet Archive confirms the Angelfire page is, indeed, from 1999 — matching Zuckerberg's age at the time.) He's trying to promote his new AOL program, The Vader Fader. "It is a decent fader," he writes. Mark would love some comments about his website, and you can email him at "themarke51@aol.com."

    Beyond the inherent hilarity of seeing an Angelfire page from Mark Zuckerberg, there's some great foreshadowing of his later efforts. Take Mark's page on "The Web," which includes a Java applet linking the names of people on the web. (Mark, of course, is the red-highlighted central connection from which all others branch out.) "As of now, The Web is pretty small," Mark writes. "Hopefully, it will grow into a larger Web." You see, Mark would love to get your name on the internet. "If your name is already on The Web because someone else has chosen to be linked to you, then you may choose two additional people to be linked with," Mark writes. Of course, without a way to scrape names and photos from a campus network, Mark had to take a more diplomatic approach. "If you see someone who you know and would like to be linked with but your name is not already on The Web, then you can contact me and I will link that person to you and put you on The Web. In order for this applet to work, you must email me your name."

    If you want to go deeper into the mind of Mark, he's also offered plenty of early "Likes." The best food? "Quesadillas," he writes. How about the best kid to make fun of? That'd be "Pete." And the best musician? "NOT Pete," Mark writes. Poor Pete.

    Thanks, Chris!

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    I remember all of those sites and you just made me feel old!

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    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by up2trouble View Post
    I remember all of those sites and you just made me feel old!
    LOL, yeah, me too.

  10. #10
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by up2trouble View Post
    I remember all of those sites and you just made me feel old!


    Remember Angelfire. I swear the old web seems better by todays standards. Its not you are straight up spammed as we are today.


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