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Thread: Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Supreme Court Justice and Liberal Icon, Dies at 87

  1. #51
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/a-...id=mailsignout

    'A leader of all humanity': Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a hero, icon, fighter for women and girls across the nation

    Time froze for girls and women across the nation Friday night as millions learned that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg – the second woman in U.S. history to sit on the high court – died of complications from pancreatic cancer.

    For many, it was the loss of a hero, an icon and a champion.

    Vanessa Cantley was at her son's first high school football game in Louisville, Kentucky, on Friday night when she got an alert on her phone.

    "My heart just stopped, and I started to cry, which was notable for me because I'm 43 years old, and I've never cried over the death of a public figure or a famous person – somebody I didn’t know personally," Cantley said. "I guess I always sort of had in the back of my mind that she might live forever because if anybody could do it, she could."

    Cantley organized a small vigil for Ginsburg on Saturday morning, where about 20 people talked about what Ginsburg's life meant to them. "I'm a practicing attorney and also a mother of two, so she’s truly a trailblazer for me," Cantley said.

    USA TODAY spoke with girls and women about the impact of Ginsburg's life and work on their lives, and how her grit, intellect and compassion inspired them.

    Once one of nine women in a law school class of 500, the nation’s preeminent litigator for women’s rights founded the Women’s Rights Project of the American Civil Liberties Union and argued six cases before the court on which she would one day sit, winning five. Ginsburg pursued a new legal strategy in gender discrimination cases, finding male plaintiffs to challenge laws that discriminated "on the basis of sex."

    As an associate justice, Ginsburg wrote the 7-1 ruling that opened the doors of the Virginia Military Institute to women. She voted with the majority to strike down state laws banning same-sex marriage and helped save President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act for the second time. She became the first justice in history to preside at a same-sex wedding ceremony.

    Melinda Ojermark, a recently retired global health expert in Washington, went to the Supreme Court building Saturday morning to pay her respects. She said Ginsburg's "brilliance, humility and tenacity were unparalleled."

    "She was a role model for women, but more important, also men have taken note and learned from her life and leadership," Ojermark said. "This morning, as I watched people paying their respect, there were many men among those. She was a leader of all humanity, not just women."

    Yvonne Joyner, 58, who lives outside Philadelphia and runs an art group in Brooklyn, New York, said she had been keeping up with news of Ginsburg receiving the Liberty Medal from the National Constitution Center the night before her death. Joyner was coming from the grocery store with a bottle of wine for a night in when she saw the report on TV.

    "I just sat there, and some tears kind of fell, and I sat there in shock, thinking – what's going to happen now? Not just politically but all the things she stood for that were so important. Who is going to embrace everybody now?" Joyner said. "It was too much. To be honest, I was kind of in shock."

    Joyner said she started a group chat with her daughters and stepson and planned a time for them all to talk.

    "Oddly enough, it was my stepson who proclaimed the loudest pain," Joyner said. "I think that she was standing up in that way goes to show the spectrum of people she's impacted. As a Black woman, it makes me say, no, we deserve equal rights across the board. We deserve the same rights white men get with the Constitution."

    For many, the diminutive woman was more than a judge on the nation's highest court; she was a pop culture phenomenon.

    Ginsburg took the stage at operas, was embodied in many a "Saturday Night Live" skit, was portrayed in the feature film "On the Basis of Sex" and featured in an Oscar-nominated 2018 documentary, "RBG," which included a scene of the justice lifting weights while wearing a sweatshirt emblazoned with the words "super diva!"

    Ginsburg's face adorns candles, clothing, mugs, pillows, totes, face masks and more. There are Ginsburg-inspired tattoos, jewelry lines, action figures and bobbleheads. In the wake of her death, "Notorious R.B.G." memes – a play on the late rapper Notorious B.I.G. – and photos of Ginsburg Halloween costumes, complete with "dissenting collar," robe, glasses, earrings and gavel, began to recirculate online.

    Novelist Donna Dechen Birdwell, who lives in Austin, Texas, joked she's "never been into hero worship," but "growing up in an era where there were very few women of high character and achievement whom I'd want to emulate, Justice Ginsburg was there. She was an anchor of hope for my daughter's future."

    Several women said they would remember Ginsburg as someone who stood up for access to health care, fought through her own health struggles and inspired them to care for others.

    Barbara Wood, a clinical psychologist who practices in Bethesda, Maryland, said Ginsburg's life work and grit makes her want to give back.

    "To me, she is someone who battled every day to fulfill the highest ideals of our founders that we are all created equal and deserve equal treatment under the law," Wood said. "Her example will always inspire me to remember that each day, regardless of physical or emotional pain, I have the opportunity and obligation to contribute to the welfare of others."

    New York City resident Tati Chin, 26, who works in finance, said Ginsburg's rulings on women's reproductive rights were most important to her. In 2014, Ginsburg dissented in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, which determined that family-owned and other closely held companies cannot be forced to offer insurance coverage for certain birth control methods.

    "For me, it was just powerful because I have an IUD and am strongly propelled for reproductive rights for women, so her dissenting meant a lot to me at the time," Chin said.

    San Diego resident Sue Eng Ly, 29, said Ginsburg's example is what gave her the strength to file a Title XI suit against a man she said assaulted her in graduate school and to persevere through the process when she had doubts about "ruffling people's feathers."

    "You know how people pray to the rosary when terrible things happen? I’d try to channel her strength," Ly said. "In a lot of ways, Justice Ginsburg, her fierce advocacy showed me, particularly as a woman of color, that I was worthy."

    Kaitlin Welborn, 34, who works for the ACLU of Alabama, said Ginsburg is the reason she went to law school and advocates for women's reproductive rights. Her cat's name is Ginsburg.

    "I think she has made me a better lawyer. I aim to always emulate everything that she has done," said Welborn, who wore a "Notorious RBG" T-shirt. "I admire the adversity that she went through and how she was able to keep her integrity and her values and still succeed. And that she was able to find a partner in life, Marty Ginsburg, who was an equal partner."

    Welborn recalled working at a college bookstore in 2007, making $2 less than her male counterpart, the year that Ginsburg dissented in Ledbetter v. Goodyear. The court ruled employers cannot be sued over race or gender pay discrimination if the claims are based on decisions made by the employer 180 days ago or more. Ginsburg urged Congress to right the court’s wrong, and Congress passed the Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay Act in 2009.

    "That showed me that even when you lose, it is meaningful to make that stance – that you might still win in the long run because you’re laying the groundwork for the future," Welborn said. "Small wins make a difference. And the fact that you are doing it at all makes a difference for your clients, and the rest of women in America."

    As a lawyer focusing on domestic violence law, Parisa Pirooz, 29, said Ginsburg's stamina as an outspoken woman, Jew, and Supreme Court justice gives her courage when she finds herself in difficult positions.

    "As someone who has to constantly be in that position to be in that fight, and when you see someone in that position, you know the pain and the strength and the amount of energy that that drains," Pirooz said. "To be in these spaces where you can’t put your guard down at any moment, to exhibit that amount of strength consistently is difficult."

    Pirooz said she's seen a range of reactions from friends and colleagues to Ginsburg's death – some critical of the justice's decisions.

    "I don’t think it's fair to her legacy to expect that she always have the right opinions or answers to our societal issues," Pirooz said. "I think it’s conducive to our nation’s progression to celebrate – give her credit where credit is due."

    Women of all ages said Ginsburg had a profound impact on their lives.

    Katherine Nguyen, 27, a nurse in the Philadelphia area, said Ginsburg taught her you're never too young or too old to make a difference.

    "She fought for rights I take for granted and reap the benefits from and am still learning about," Nguyen said. "She was outspoken, passionate and remained politically active past a typical 'retirement' age."

  2. #52
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.usatoday.com/story/opini...mn/5834820002/

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg's life and work propelled women's equality front and center

    She was not the first woman justice, but she was the first voice for women’s justice.

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg dedicated her career to gender equality before being appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1993, where she served until her death. While Sandra Day O’Connor had the distinction of being the first woman in American history to serve on the Supreme Court, it was Ginsburg who brought to the court the perspective of women’s rights.

    Sometimes referred to as “the Thurgood Marshall of gender equality law,” Ginsburg argued six cases before the court on which she would one day sit, winning five. While serving as director of the Women’s Rights Project of the American Civil Liberties Union, Ginsburg developed a novel legal strategy in gender discrimination cases, finding male plaintiffs to challenge laws that discriminated “on the basis of sex,” a phrase that would later become the title of a biopic about her life.

    One of the cases she argued resulted in court decision that the 14th Amendment’s Equal Protection Clause applies to women, now taken as a given. Another case she argued led to the development of the test known as “intermediate scrutiny,” requiring proof of a substantial government interest before the government may enact a law that discriminates between men and women.

    As a Supreme Court justice, Ginsburg wrote the opinion striking down the men-only admissions policy of the Virginia Military Academy, finding that it violated her old friend, the Equal Protection Clause. Her dissent in a case involving pay discrimination in the workplace led to the enactment of Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act.

    Ginsburg served on the District of Columbia Court of Appeals for 13 years before President Bill Clinton named her to the high court. At the time of her appointment, she was deemed a "moderate." She would come to be considered part of the Supreme Court’s liberal block, a description that may indicate that the court changed as much as she did.

    Ginsburg faced down detractors

    Ginsburg’s presence on the court highlighted the importance of diverse perspectives in judicial decision-making. In what may have struck others as counter-intuitive, Ginsburg advocated against laws that appeared on their face to favor women because they were based on stereotypes that harmed women in the long run. The contributions Ginsburg made opened doors for other women who came later. Elena Kagan credited Ginsburg with making the way easier for her when she joined the court in 2010.

    Ginsburg’s feminist views did not prevent her from sometimes filling traditional roles. She began her legal studies at Harvard law school, and dutifully followed her husband to New York, transferring to Columbia to finish her legal education.

    Like many women lawyers of her day, Ginsburg faced sexism when she sought to begin her career. She was turned down for jobs at law firms and for a Supreme Court clerkship with Justice Felix Frankfurter because she was a woman, rejections that must have stung for a highly accomplished law student. Her confirmation to the court marked how far she and society had come during the course of her lifetime, in large part because of her own work.

    Ginsburg was not without critics.

    She drew disapproval for making negative comments about Donald Trump when he was a candidate for president, the type of political statement usually considered taboo for sitting judges. In return, Trump tweeted that she should resign.

    She once fell asleep during one of President Barack Obama’s State of the Union addresses, admitting that she was “not 100% sober” because of too much wine at dinner. And as she battled cancer and advancing age, one could argue that she missed the opportunity to step down from the court during the Obama administration, when a Democratic president could have appointed her successor.

    While her greatest contributions were as a jurist, her legacy transcends the law. Known affectionately in later years by the nickname “Notorious RBG,” Ginsburg became a feminist icon. Her image appeared on everything from coffee mugs to T-shirts to books documenting her famed workout regimen. An RBG action figure sits on a bookshelf in my office. My teenage daughter’s field hockey team has a play named after Ginsburg. We enjoyed these reminders of her powerful spirit.

    Seeing Ginsburg sitting on the nation’s highest court brought to me a feeling of possibility. She was so small in stature, but so strong in will. For women and girls, for minorities of all types, for those of us who have ever had someone make us feel “less than,” RBG was an inspiration to be a fierce advocate for equality.

  3. #53
    Senior Member KimTisha's Avatar
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    She was quite a lady. May the Notorious RBG rest in peace....
    You are talking to a woman who has laughed in the face of death, sneered at doom and chuckled at catastrophe.
    ...Collector of Chairs. Reader of Books. Hater of Nutmeg...

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    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnLanders View Post
    Love this. I heard that there's a documentary about her on Netflix so I'll be searching to watch it. She accomplished so much in her career against the odds and did so much for the people in general. What an amazing Woman.

    ETA: The documentary is on Hulu, not Netflix. I'll be watching tonight.
    Last edited by Boston Babe 73; 09-21-2020 at 10:01 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

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    Cranjis McBasketball Nic B's Avatar
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    Saleen, I would never tell you racism doesn't exist in this country because I am white and have no idea what people of color go through. (but I do recognize it and it pisses me off when white people say racism doesn't exist, like how the fuck do you know when you never dealt with it?)

    So you should never tell a woman she is treated equally to a man, 100% of the time (as it should be) because how would you know?


    Quote Originally Posted by marakisses View Post
    yes i said i will leave it under you storage he said cuddle with me i said shut up it over??? what am i doing wrong??

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    Sana sana colita de rana beli's Avatar
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    hijo de su madre querida, shut the fuck up saleen.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gawna View Post
    Roses are red, violets are blue, seriously where is the fucking ring I gave Julie and ask her mom about the flowers
    Quote Originally Posted by Ron_NYC View Post
    In all fairness, we have no idea how big this dude's cock was.

  8. #58
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/ru...id=mailsignout

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg is the first woman who will lie in state at the Capitol

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in repose at the Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on Wednesday and Thursday, giving mourners an opportunity to pay their last respects to the longtime legal giant.

    Ginsburg's casket will arrive in front of the Supreme Court building before 9:30 a.m. on Wednesday, with a private ceremony set to commence in the Great Hall, according to a release issued by the Court. The ceremony will include family members, friends, and members of the Supreme Court.

    Ginsburg will then lie in repose on the Lincoln Catafalque under the Portico at the top of the building's front steps for an outdoor viewing. Members of the public are invited to the viewing, which will occur from 11 a.m. until 10 p.m on Wednesday and between 9 a.m. and 10 p.m. on Thursday.

    She will also lie in state at the US Capitol on Friday, becoming the first woman in history to hold that honor. Rosa Parks, one of the most notable figures of the civil rights movement, was lain in honor at the Capitol building after she died in 2005. While private citizens are able to lie in honor, only government officials and military officers may lie in state.

    Next week, Ginsburg will be interred at Arlington National Cemetery in a private service, alongside her late husband, Martin Ginsburg, who died in 2010.

    In following a longtime Supreme Court tradition, a black wool crepe has been placed on Ginsburg's bench chair and the bench immediately in front of it. This tradition dates to the death of then-Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase in 1873. A black drape has also been placed over the doors to the main courtroom.

    Ginsburg, who died on Friday on the eve of Rosh Hashanah at the age of 87, served for 13 years on the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit before being appointed to the Supreme Court in 1993 by then-President Bill Clinton. During her 27 years on the Supreme Court, she led the court's liberal bloc and became a feminist icon.

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    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    The fact that she's the first woman in or nation's history to lie in state only amplifies how much she did for Women's rights and that we are far from done with the work. On one hand, I'm happy that they're really honoring her, on the other I know that the Jewish religion usually calls for burial within three days of death. But then again, she was known for breaking tradition
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

  10. #60
    Senior Member puzzld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Babe 73 View Post
    The fact that she's the first woman in or nation's history to lie in state only amplifies how much she did for Women's rights and that we are far from done with the work. On one hand, I'm happy that they're really honoring her, on the other I know that the Jewish religion usually calls for burial within three days of death. But then again, she was known for breaking tradition
    Exactly my thought. She was a trail blazer in so many things. Too bad women have been so limited in what they were allowed to do, and too bad recognition for their accomplishments has been so hard to come by.
    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    lol at Nestle being some vicious smiter, she's the nicest person on this site besides probably puzzld. Or at least the last person to resort to smiting.
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    Why on earth would I smite you when I can ban you?

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    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by puzzld View Post
    Exactly my thought. She was a trail blazer in so many things. Too bad women have been so limited in what they were allowed to do, and too bad recognition for their accomplishments has been so hard to come by.
    You must spread some reputation
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

  12. #62
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    I just watched the documentary. RBG is a MUST SEE. I thought I knew everything she had done, but I was proven wrong. It was so much more. Also, Marty also made our progress a reality. It's a case of behind this great woman was an even greater man. I love Marty.
    Last edited by Boston Babe 73; 09-22-2020 at 09:10 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

  13. #63
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://thehill.com/regulation/court...-supreme-court

    Republican Govs. Phil Scott (Vt.) and Charlie Baker (Mass.) called on President Trump and Senate Republicans to wait until after the November election to fill the Supreme Court vacancy following Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death.

    The governors’ statements come in response to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's (R-Ky.) announcement Friday night that “President Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate.”

    McConnell’s decision came about an hour after news broke that Ginsburg died at the age of 87 due to complications from metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    Scott, who faces reelection in November, said in a series of tweets Friday evening that while he believes “it is important to take the time to mourn” Ginsburg’s death, he urged lawmakers “to follow precedent, as well as her dying wishes, and delay the appointment process until after Inauguration Day.”

    NPR on Friday obtained a statement Ginsburg dictated to her granddaughter days before the justice’s death, in which Ginsburg revealed that her “most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed.”

    Baker echoed Scott’s sentiments in a tweet Saturday, saying, “The passing of Justice Ginsburg is not only a loss for the court but for the entire nation.”

    The Massachusetts governor added, “I urge President Trump and the U.S. Senate to allow the American people to cast their ballots for President before a new justice is nominated or confirmed.”

    In a follow-up tweet, Baker argued that the Supreme Court "is too important to rush and must be removed from partisan political infighting

    President Trump tweeted Saturday that he would be moving quickly to nominate a replacement for Ginsburg.

    "We were put in this position of power and importance to make decisions for the people who so proudly elected us, the most important of which has long been considered to be the selection of United States Supreme Court Justices," Trump said, tagging the Republican Party’s official account. "We have this obligation, without delay!"

    Several Democratic lawmakers vocalized their position that lawmakers should honor the late justice’s wishes and wait to fill the vacancy, with Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) tweeting that McConnell “is cementing a shameful legacy of brazen hypocrisy.”

    Republicans in 2016 denied a confirmation hearing for former President Barack Obama’s Supreme Court pick Merrick Garland, arguing at the time that a Supreme Court vacancy should not be filled during a presidential election year.

  14. #64
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    I love how fuckstick in chief says that they are supposed to make decisions for the people that elected him yet isn't waiting until people elect (reject) him.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

  15. #65
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    So for all the misogynistic assholes (men and women) who say "well, it's ok they will get rid of legal abortion, because people should be using birth control and being responsible anyway", Amy Barrett doesn't believe in American's right to use contraceptives. Too bad her parents didn't use birth control.

    And don't say that "she didn't say, that doesn't mean she doesn't believe in it"...she has only stayed silent on the things she doesn't agree with and doesn't want to answer.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/am...id=mailsignout

    Judge Amy Coney Barrett refused to say whether she agrees with the Supreme Court's landmark rulings protecting access to contraceptives and LGBTQ rights.
    Barrett said during her Wednesday Senate confirmation hearing that she couldn't "grade precedent" when it comes to these key rulings and suggested that they remain unsettled.
    But she added that it's "shockingly unlikely" that the Supreme Court would overturn its ruling legalizing access to birth control.
    At the same time, Barrett has said that other landmark decisions, including those that outlawed the "separate but equal doctrine" and legalized interracial marriage, were correctly decided.
    Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

    Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee, refused to say whether she agrees with the Supreme Court's landmark rulings protecting access to contraceptives and LGBTQ rights during her Senate confirmation hearing on Wednesday.

    Barrett said she couldn't give "a yes or a no" answer as to whether Griswold v. Connecticut, which legalized access to birth control in 1965, was correctly decided because she "can't grade precedent." She said the same of the Court's 2003 ruling in Lawrence v. Texas, which made bans on homosexual activity unconstitutional, and its 2015 decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, which legalized same-sex marriage.

    But she has repeatedly said that other landmark decisions, including Brown v. Board of Education, which banned racial segregation in schools, and Loving v. Virginia, which legalized interracial marriage, were correctly decided.

    The judge argued that it's "shockingly unlikely" the Supreme Court will overturn Griswold.

    "I think that Griswold is very, very, very, very, very, very unlikely to go anywhere," Barrett said.

    She added later, "I would be surprised if birth control was about to be criminalized."

    But earlier this year, the Supreme Court ruled in Little Sisters of the Poor v. Pennsylvania that the Trump administration could legally allow employers to deny birth control and other contraceptive healthcare coverage to their employees on the basis of the employer's religious beliefs. Similarly, in 2014, the Court decided in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby that corporations could deny contraceptive coverage to their employees on the basis of their religious beliefs, striking down Obamacare's contraceptive mandate.

    Barrett argued on Wednesday that the only reason Democratic senators were asking her about Griswold is because of that decision's implications for the Supreme Court's landmark ruling in Roe v. Wade, which protects the right to an abortion. The rulings in both Griswold and Roe are grounded in the right to privacy.

    "I think the only reason that it's even worth asking that question is to lay a predicate for whether Roe was rightly decided," she said.

    On Tuesday, Barrett said she doesn't believe Roe is a "super-precedent," meaning she doesn't think the case is settled enough to protect it from being overturned by the Supreme Court.

    "Roe is not a super-precedent because calls for its overruling have never ceased, but that doesn't mean that Roe should be overruled," Barrett said.

    Democrats condemned Barrett's refusal to state her legal position on Griswold and pointed out that recent Supreme Court nominees, including conservatives Justices Clarence Thomas, Samuel Alito, Brett Kavanaugh, and Chief Justice John Roberts, have all said they agree with the ruling in Griswold during their own confirmation hearings.

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    ^Lmao the leftist alarmism and tears are hilarious.

    What happens when Roe is still the law four years from now? Do you people ever admit you're wrong?

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    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mj2sexay View Post
    ^Lmao the leftist alarmism and tears are hilarious.

    What happens when Roe is still the law four years from now? Do you people ever admit you're wrong?
    So you're saying the religious droid the Right Wing is shoving on to the SC isn't going to be able to get the job done the way they want it to be done? LMAO, womp, womp.
    Last edited by raisedbywolves; 10-15-2020 at 05:35 AM.

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    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/a-...id=mailsignout

    A bronze statue of Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be erected in Brooklyn on her birthday next year

    A bronze statue of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will be erected in her hometown of Brooklyn next March on what would be the legal trailblazer's 88th birthday.

    The statue "will commemorate her leadership in the struggle for gender equality and society's broader march for human rights," and it will be installed during Women's History Month next year, the group behind the work said Tuesday in a statement.

    It's part of a larger series called Statues for Equality, which has worked to increase the representation of women in public sculptures around New York City and beyond. The artists who created the statue, Gillie and Marc, worked with Ginsburg and got her approval for the sculpture, they said.

    The statue "reflects her wish to be depicted in a dignified manner," Gillie and Marc said in a statement.

    "With the two steps on its large base representing the Supreme Court and the climb she made to get there, the work is designed to provide the public with an opportunity to stand at her side, and gain inspiration from her journey fighting for equal rights,” they added.

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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    So you're saying the religious droid the Right Wing is shoving on to the SC isn't going to be able to get the job done the way they want it to be done? LMAO, womp, womp.
    ReLiGiOuS dRoId.

    Same old shit. I guess when you can't accuse the nominee of being the leader of a gangrape ring you have to go back to old reliables.

    Your anti-Catholic bigotry is very much noted. Disgusting.

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    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mj2sexay View Post
    ReLiGiOuS dRoId.

    Same old shit. I guess when you can't accuse the nominee of being the leader of a gangrape ring you have to go back to old reliables.

    Your anti-Catholic bigotry is very much noted. Disgusting.
    There's a reason why there's supposed to be a separation of church and state. It's because the rest of us have a right not to live by the greedy Catholic values. They can live by them all they want, but the rest of America shouldn't have to.

    Try putting a staunch Muslim that believes the country should follow Shari'a Law on there and see how quickly your mind changes when they decide FOR YOU how you should live and what rights you should have.
    Last edited by Boston Babe 73; 10-23-2020 at 06:28 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

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    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    I am anti catholicism...and all other religions. Religion is a device to keep simple people in line...the opiate of the masses. I think for myself, not for some pedophile priest.

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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    I am anti catholicism...and all other religions. Religion is a device to keep simple people in line...the opiate of the masses. I think for myself, not for some pedophile priest.
    ^^^^^^
    This.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Babe 73 View Post
    There's a reason why there's supposed to be a separation of church and state. It's because the rest of us have a right not to live by the greedy Catholic values. They can live by them all they want, but the rest of America shouldn't have to.

    Try putting a staunch Muslim that believes the country should follow Shari'a Law on there and see how quickly your mind changes when they decide FOR YOU how you should live and what rights you should have.
    Of course the irony of this comment being that if a Muslim did want to enact Sharia law from the bench, you braindead leftist mongoloids would be screaming about diversity and islamaphobia when someone called it out.

    As for catholic values being "Greedy" again the bigotry in this thread is off the charts.

    But as an exercise, try showing one holding of hers or legal commentary in a journal in which she in any way utilizes her religion to come to a conclusion as opposed to the law.

    Otherwise you and the other one can take this anti-Catholic bigotry which puts you right in line with the KKK and cram it.

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