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Thread: Wildfire Roundup for California

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  3. #103
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.sacbee.com/news/local/article245672580.html

    Update 12 reported deaths at the Butte County Fires.


    http://mydeathspace.com/vb/showthrea...utte-County-CA

    We mentioned Josiah Williams in another thread but that was due to the fact he was the first known identified victim in the California Wildfires. But then again this is still an ongoing rescue operation.


    The number of dead in the West Zone fire that largely destroyed the Butte County community of Berry Creek Tuesday grew to 12 on Saturday as the size and containment of the fire grew incrementally.

    Two of the victims have been positively identified — a 16-year-old and a 77-year-old — and another 13 people remain missing.

    On Saturday, three more bodies found in the ruins, according to Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea. Honea did not provide more information on the victims.

    Honea asked for Urban Search and Rescue Teams to come in to search for remains on Friday.

    “Right now, the areas that we need to search are too hot and Cal Fire has asked us to wait to deploy those later…,” the sheriff said at the time.

    Officials had said Thursday that 10 people had been confirmed dead, but reduced that to nine after determining that what appeared to be skeletal remains in a storage shed was actually an anatomical model used for study in anthropology.

    “I can tell you that in the burned condition that it was it very, very much looked like human remains,” the sheriff said Friday.

    Honea confirmed one victim of the fire was a 16-year-old high school student overtaken by flames before he could escape.

    Authorities have told the family of Josiah Williams that he was killed in the blaze, his aunt, Bobbie Zedaker, said.

    “He was supposed to leave when his brother did, but he didn’t,” Zedaker said. “I have no idea why.”

    Zedaker said authorities had asked Williams’ brother for DNA to establish the identity of a victim found in Berry Creek, one of 10 known victims from the blaze so far.

    Honea confirmed that Williams was identified as one of the fatalities.

    “It was believed that Josiah was leaving the area in his own vehicle, but it appears he did not make it out,” Honea said.

    Zedaker said Williams’ mother, Jessica Williams, was flying out to California from Indiana Friday morning and described her nephew as “a very smart kid.”

    “He was adventurous, he was very outgoing, he was very kind,” she said.


    Family members had posted pleas for help in finding him on social media, writing that he had last been seen at the family home on Bean Creek Road.

    Zedaker said her own home on Hidden Springs Road was destroyed in the fire, and that she barely had time to leave Tuesday when authorities warned residents they needed to flee immediately.

    “We had like 20 minutes after they sent out the alerts,” she said, adding that she lost essentially all of her belongings.

    A second fatality was Millicent Catarancuic, 77, who was found near a vehicle along with two other victims who have yet to be named.

    Catarancuic’s nephew, Zygy Roe-Zurz, told the Associated Press she loved animals and had four dogs and several cats at her 5-acre property.


    Zurz said Catarancuic was “sharp as a whip” and loved to play FreeCell, saying she could win the game in about 80 seconds.

    Zurz said his mother, Suzan Violet Zurz, and his uncle, Phil Rubel, also lived at the property and are missing.

    Holly Catarancuic, Millicent Catarancuic’s daughter, told the AP her mom had lived in Berry Creek for about eight years. She said her mom had been very happy and the property was a “safe haven” for the family.

    Only a handful of structures in the town in the hills above Lake Oroville survived the fire, which was originally named the Bear Fire but now is being called the West Zone of the North Complex Fire.

    As damage surveys continue, Cal Fire officials said 132 homes have been destroyed and 13 homes have been damaged; 36 commercial structures have been destroyed; 59 outbuildings have been destroyed and 10 have been damaged.


    On Saturday afternoon, Cal Fire officials said the West Zone was 73,000 acres and 10% contained — the overall North Complex has burned 252,313 and was 21% contained.

    Homes, businesses, churches and a camp for children with cancer burned to the ground throughout the town, and wrecked and burned vehicles could be seen on various roadways, apparent evidence of residents trying to flee.

    At one spot near where the California Highway Patrol said two victims had been found, on Graystone Lane near Bald Rock Road, two burned vehicles sat immobile with a red X painted on the doors.

    One was a small pickup and had the remnants of a burned out guitar case and melted CDs in the bed.

    The other was a four-door hatchback, with a large dog crate in the rear with the bodies of two small dogs that had been burned. Another, larger dog was also in the hatch area and appeared to have been burned in the fire.

  4. #104
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://apnews.com/14204c0735fb87d3d126992e0523d011

    Update there is now a total of 33 reported deaths in the West Coast Wildfires.

    SALEM, Ore. (AP) ? Nearly all of the dozens of people reported missing after a devastating blaze in southern Oregon have been accounted for, authorities said, as crews continued to battle wildfires that have killed at least 33 victims from California to Washington state.

    The flames have destroyed neighborhoods, leaving a barren, gray landscape in their wake, driven tens of thousands of people from their homes and cast a shroud of smoke over the region.

    The crisis has come amid the coronavirus outbreak, the economic downturn and nationwide racial unrest that has led to protests in Portland for more than 100 days.

    ?What?s next?? asked Danielle Oliver, who had to flee her home outside Portland. ?You have the protests, coronavirus pandemic, now the wildfires. What else can go wrong??

    RELATED STORIES

    Late Saturday, the Jackson County Sheriff?s office said that four people had died in the wildfire that burned in the Ashland area. Authorities earlier this week said as many as 50 people could be missing from the blaze. But they said the number of people unaccounted for is now down to one.

    At least 10 people have been killed in the past week throughout Oregon. Officials have said more people are missing from other blazes, and the number of fatalities is likely to rise. Twenty-two people have died in California, and one person has been killed in Washington state.



    Among the people killed was Millicent Catarancuic, who was found near her car at her five-acre home in Berry Creek, California. At one point she was ready to evacuate with her dogs and cats in the car. But she changed her mind as the winds seemed to calm and the flames stayed away.

    Then the fire changed direction, rushing onto the property too quickly for her to leave. She died, along with her animals.

    ?I feel like, maybe when they passed, they had an army of cats and dogs with her to help her through it,? said her daughter, Holly Catarancuic.

    George Coble lost everything just outside Mill City, Oregon ? his fence-building business, five houses where his family lived and a collection of vintage cars, including a 1967 Mustang.


    George Coble walks through what remains of a home on his property destroyed by a wildfire in Mill City, Ore. (AP Photo/John Locher)
    Full Coverage: Wildfires
    ?We?ll just keep working and keep your head up and thank God everybody got out,? Coble said.

    In a town nearby, Erik Tucker spent the day coated in ash and smudged with charcoal, hauling buckets of water through what remained of his neighborhood to douse hot spots.

    ?No power, debris everywhere, smoke, can?t breathe,? he said, the air thick with ash.

    Fire-charred landscapes looked like bombed-out cities in Europe after World War II, with buildings reduced to charred rubble piled atop blackened earth. People caught in the wildfires died in an instant, overcome by flames or smoke as they desperately tried to escape.

    The Democratic governors of all three states have said the fires are a consequence of global warming.

    ?We absolutely must act now to avoid a future defined by an unending barrage of tragedies like the one American families are enduring across the West today,? said Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden.

    The dry, windy conditions that fed the flames in Oregon were probably a once-in-a-generation event, said Greg Jones, a professor and research climatologist at Linfield University in McMinnville. The warmer world can increase the likelihood of extreme events and contribute to their severity, he said.


    A burned residence is seen as destructive wildfires devastate the region, in Talent, Ore. (AP Photo/Paula Bronstein)
    There was some good news Saturday: The same smoke that painted California skies orange also helped crews corral the state?s deadliest blaze this year by blocking the sun, reducing temperatures and raising humidity.

    Smoke created cooler conditions in Oregon as well. But it was also blamed for creating the dirtiest air in at least 35 years in some places, ?literally off the charts,? the state?s environmental quality spokesperson, Laura Gleim, said.


    A man stops on his bike along the Willamette River as smoke from wildfires partially obscures the Tilikum Crossing Bridge in Portland, Ore. (AP Photo/John Locher)
    In Portland, smoke filled the air with an acrid metallic scent like pennies. It was so thick that Ashley Kreitzer could not see the road when she headed to work as a driver for a ride-hailing service.

    ?I couldn?t even see 5 feet ahead of me,? she said. ?I was panicking, I didn?t even know if I wanted to go out.?

    People stuffed towels under door jambs to keep smoke out or wore N95 masks in their own homes.

    Meanwhile, there was political turmoil as Oregon?s fire marshal was forced out while a half-million state residents were ordered to evacuate or warned to be ready to leave. Details were scarce on why he was put on leave, then resigned.

    ___

    Whitehurst reported from Portland. Associated Press writers Gillian Flaccus in Mill City, Oregon, Gene Johnson in Seattle and Adam Beam in Sacramento, California, contributed to this report.

    http://mydeathspace.com/vb/showthrea...dfire-Warnings

    http://mydeathspace.com/vb/showthrea...ldfire-roundup


    Update we will now merge the Oregon Wildfire roundup and the Washington State Wildfire roundups to this thread under the name "West Coast Wildfires 2020" thanks due to the sheer fallouts.

  5. #105
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://calgaryherald.com/news/local...ires-drifts-in

    As smoke from deadly western U.S. wildfires moves into Alberta, air quality in Calgary is expected to worsen over Sunday.

    Environment Canada said the air quality index is forecast to move from level 4 to 5 by Sunday night, both levels in the moderate range of public health risk.

    Unless they’re feeling symptoms like coughing or a sore throat, those without pre-existing health conditions shouldn’t have to moderate their activities.

    But at-risk populations with conditions like lung disease or asthma should “consider reducing or rescheduling strenuous activities outdoors if you are experiencing symptoms,” states the Environment Canada website.

    By Monday, the air quality in the Calgary area is expected to improve slightly, to a level 4.

    On Saturday, Environment Canada issued air quality alerts for southwestern Alberta, which is more directly impacted by wildfire smoke from blazes along the U.S. West Coast drifting into the region due to a low pressure system.

    That includes Pincher Creek, Waterton and the Crowsnest Pass.

    “The anticipated smoke trajectory indicates that the areas impacted will grow to the north and east as the weekend progresses and this alert will likely be expanded,” said the federal agency’s website.

    But it also said the smoke should begin to clear out of Alberta by Monday night.

    The smoke, which contains toxins including carbon monoxide and tiny particulates, can impact respiratory and cardiovascular health.

    “There’s really no safe exposure to (particulate matter) because it gets right into your capillaries and into your lungs even if you’re a healthy person, but it’s definitely more of a concern if you have health conditions,” said Jill Bloor, executive director of the monitoring group Calgary Region Airshed Zone.

    Most protective COVID-19 masks are also ineffective in protecting from the tiny particulate matter contained in wildfire smoke, she said.

    Scientists say the impacts of climate change have parched forested areas, heightening the intensity and size of wildfires.

    The blazes in the U.S. have raced through wide areas of California, Oregon and Washington State, destroying thousands of buildings and killing dozens of people.

  6. #106
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    https://bc.ctvnews.ca/mobile/vancouv...ires-1.5101956

    BURNABY, B.C. -- For a few hours Friday, Metro Vancouver air quality was as bad as it has ever been, as smoke from dozens of wildfires burning out-of-control in California and Oregon blew in and settled over the city.

    In many neighbourhoods, the thick blanket of smoke blocked out the downtown skyline and the North Shore mountains — prompting warnings from Environment Canada and Metro Vancouver.

    “Right now, we’re experiencing some of the worst air quality that we’ve ever experienced in this part of the region,” said Ken Reid, Metro Vancouver’s superintendent of environmental monitoring and sampling.

    For most of the day, Vancouver ranked number four on a list of cities with the worst air quality in the world — eclipsed only by three U.S. cities closer to the wildfires burning in U.S. pacific states.

    The smoke from those fires will hang around for at least a few more days, with the possibility even more could blow in from off-shore.

    “There may be periods of time where there’s less smoke, there may be periods of time where there’s more smoke,” said Reid. “If some smoke comes in that’s aloft, at higher elevations, it may create dramatic sunsets, orange skies, or even block out the sun from time to time.”

    The conditions are not expected to get as bad as San Francisco, where an eery orange haze settled over the city earlier this week, creating apocalyptic images.

    Still, the situation here is bad enough that even healthy people are being encouraged to avoid strenuous activity until the air quality advisories are lifted.

    Conditions are particularly bad for people with underlying conditions like asthma, and it could also worsen symptoms for people sick with COVID-19.

    Just heading inside may not be enough to help because the particles are small enough to make their way inside peoples’ homes even with the windows and doors closed.

  7. #107
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    https://ktla.com/news/california/wes...ifornia-visit/

    With crews battling wildfires that have killed at least 35 people, destroyed neighborhoods and enveloped the West Coast in smoke, another fight has emerged: leaders in the Democratic-led states and President Donald Trump have clashed over the role of climate change ahead of his visit Monday to California.

    California, Oregon and Washington state have seen historic wildfires that have burned faster and farther than ever before. Numerous studies in recent years have linked bigger wildfires in the U.S. to global warming from the burning of coal, oil and gas.

    The Democratic governors say the fires are a consequence of climate change, while the Trump administration has blamed poor forest management for the flames that have raced through the region and made the air in places like Portland, Oregon, Seattle and San Francisco some of the worst in the world.

    Scientists say the wildfires are all but inevitable, but that the main drivers are plants and trees drying out due to climate change and more people living closer to areas that burn. Forest thinning and controlled burns have proven challenging to implement on the scale needed to combat those threats.

    Trump is headed to McClellan Park, a former air base just outside Sacramento, California, White House spokesman Judd Deere said. California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s office said he would be meeting with Trump.

    The governors have been blunt: Washington Gov. Jay Inslee on Sunday called climate change “a blowtorch over our states in the West.”

    “It is maddening right now that when we have this cosmic challenge to our communities, with the entire West Coast of the United States on fire, to have a president to deny that these are not just wildfires, these are climate fires,” Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week.”

    As Newsom toured a ghostlike landscape destroyed by flames Friday, he called out the “ideological BS” of those who deny the danger.

    “The debate is over around climate change. Just come to the state of California, observe it with your own eyes,” he said.

    He noted that just in the last month, California had its hottest August, with world-record-setting heat in Death Valley. It had 14,000 dry lightning strikes that set off hundreds of fires, some that combined into creating five of the 10 largest fires in the state’s recorded history. And it had back-to-back heat waves.

    Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said about 500,000 acres typically burn each year, but just in the past week, flames have swallowed over a million acres, pointing to long-term drought and recent wild weather swings in the state.

    “This is truly the bellwether for climate change on the West Coast,” she said Sunday on CBS’ “Face the Nation.” “And this is a wake-up call for all of us that we have got to do everything in our power to tackle climate change.”

    At a rally in Nevada, Trump blamed the way states have run the land, saying “it is about forest management.” White House adviser Peter Navarro echoed that Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union,” saying that for many years in California, “particularly because of budget cutbacks, there was no inclination to manage our forests.”

    Forest management, which includes tree thinning and brush clearing, is costly, labor-intensive work that is effective in reducing fuel for wildfires. Millions of dollars are spent on such reduction efforts every year in Western states though many argue more needs to be done. The efforts can also be undercut when homeowners in rural areas don’t undertake similar efforts on their own properties.

    Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti accused Trump of perpetuating a lie that only forest management can curtail the massive fires seen in recent years. He pointed to drought and the need to reduce carbon emissions.

    “Talk to a firefighter, if you think that climate change isn’t real,” the Democratic mayor said on CNN’s “State of the Union.”

    It isn’t clear if global warming caused the dry, windy conditions that have fed the fires in the Pacific Northwest, but a warmer world can increase the likelihood of extreme events and contribute to their severity, said Greg Jones, a professor and research climatologist at Linfield University in McMinnville, Oregon.

    Warnings of low moisture and strong winds could fan the flames in hard-hit southern Oregon to Northern California and last through Tuesday. Tens of thousands of people have fled their homes as the fast-moving flames turned neighborhoods to nothing but charred rubble and burned-out cars.

    At least 10 people have been killed in Oregon. Officials have said more people are missing, and the number of fatalities is likely to rise, though they have not said how high the toll could go as they search. In California, 24 people have died, and one person was killed in Washington state.

    Firefighter Steve McAdoo, who has run from one blaze to another in Oregon for six days, said his neighbors in rural areas outside Portland should clear trees near their homes because a week like they just survived could happen again.

    “I would think the way the climate is changing, this may not be the last time,” he said.

    In the small southern Oregon town of Talent, Dave Monroe came back to his burned home, partly hoping he’d find his three cats.

    “We thought we’d get out of this summer with no fires,” he said. “There is something going on, that’s for sure, man. Every summer we’re burning up.”

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    https://fox40.com/news/local-news/vo...o-fight-blaze/


    BUTTE COUNTY, Calif. (KTXL) — With burned out cars on the roadways and burnt homes, it seems almost everyone in Berry Creek lost something to the North Complex fire.

    And firefighters battling the flames are no exception.

    In his 28 years as a volunteer firefighter, Chief Reed Rankin has battled more than his fair share of flames.

    “We seen the community of Paradise burn up and that was always in the back of our mind,” Rankin told FOX40. “If we get a wind event up here and there’s a fire, we’re going to be in trouble.”

    His worst nightmare came knocking Tuesday as the North Complex fire closed in on Berry Creek.

    Rankin went door to door racing to evacuate his neighbors.

    “We told them, ‘Get in your car and go now. You have no time.’” Rankin said.

    He didn’t even consider the fate of his own house until the next morning.

    “I found out my home burned down. Everything you ever had collected, all your photo albums, everything you ever had in your life was just right there and it’s all gone,” Rankin said.

    And he’s not alone.

    Six of the seven volunteer firefighters in the town lost their homes too.

    Rankin’s business making water wells was also destroyed, along with their fire station and equipment.

    But rather than call it quits, he continues to fight the blaze.

    “I don’t want to take any time off because I don’t want to sit there and think about what I lost,” Rankin said. “So, I’m just going to stay here and help my community.”

    So, everyday he continues to fight the flames patrolling hotspots to prevent any further damage.

    After all, he plans to come back to his hometown and make it feel like home once again.

    “We’re just going to pick up our pieces. We’re going to stay strong and we’re going to try to rebuild as best as we can,” Rankin said.

    Rankin did not have homeowners insurance so friends have started a GoFundMe page to help.

    If you would like to help, click or tap here.

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    https://fox5sandiego.com/news/local-...ment-underway/

    SAN DIEGO — Damage assessments were underway Monday in Lawson Valley, an area that saw its share of devastation from the Valley Fire.

    “Someone’s entire life right here got wiped out by fire,” Deputy Fire Marshal David Sibbet said.

    The county shared video of him surveying several properties where homes and outbuildings were destroyed. With buildings leveled, he said the assessments can be a challenge.

    “On large rural properties where outbuildings are common, it takes a long time to decipher the lay of the land and to understand what you’re looking at,” Sibbet said.

    He said the assessments are key for families to start the rebuilding process. Property owners need accurate information to send to their insurance company and other agencies.

    “As part of the county damage assessment team, it’s our job to get people back on their feet as soon as possible,” Sibbet said.

    The county also shared resources for families:
    RELATED CONTENT
    Valley Fire containment grows to 87%
    Valley Fire smoke expected to slowly thin over warm weekend
    Evacuation centers help residents, pets forced from homes by Valley Fire
    Recovery Assistance Hotline and Email
    Unincorporated County residents affected by the wildfires may call the Recovery Assistance Hotline (858) 715-2200 or email ValleyFireRecovery@sdcounty.ca.gov.

    Both will be staffed from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Messages and emails received after hours will be returned on the next business day.

    Donation Information
    The best way to help those impacted by the Valley fire is a financial donation to a trusted local organization that can help meet the needs of survivors when they need it. Donations of goods such as clothing and household items can sometimes be difficult to distribute as someone who just lost their home may not have a place to keep donated items. Learn more about donations after a disaster.

    Public Health and Hazardous Waste
    Wildfire Asbestos Advisory (English/Spanish)
    Fire Smoke Advisory for the Valley Fire

    Rebuilding and Permit Processing in the Unincorporated County
    Agricultural Damage Assessment

    Debris Assistance
    Solid Waste Facility Map (English/ Spanish)

    Not finding what you need?
    2-1-1 is a free source of information and referrals that connects you to services. You can call 2-1-1, 858-300-1211, or 800-227-0997, where a trained specialist will provide confidential assistance, or you can search for what you need via https://211sandiego.org/

    The Red Guide to Recovery
    The Red Guide to Recovery: A Resource Handbook for Disaster Survivors is a comprehensive, easy-to-read post incidentrecovery tool that walks disaster survivors step-by-step through the recovery process. Disaster survivors are often overwhelmed by stress and uncertainty after a loss caused by a natural or manmade disaster, and the handbook addresses such stress and uncertainty by providing the information and tools survivors need to cope with a disaster. Learn more

    View the Condensed Red Guide to Recovery for San Diego County
    Available in both English and Spanish

    https://www.yourcentralvalley.com/ne...-need-to-know/



    UPDATE Sept. 14, 3:15 P.M.: Evacuation warnings for zones M49 Road 422, M50 John West, and M51 Upper Road 426 have been lifted. Meanwhile, the evacuation order for zone M52 has been reduced to an evacuation warning.

    “Residents in the area need to be aware that there is still a potential for evacuations and need to be prepared to evacuate at a moment’s notice. Citizens need to monitor the situation and be prepared to take action immediately.”

    The evacuation map is available at this link.

    UPDATE Sept 14, 2:20 P.M.: Evacuation orders have now been reduced to evacuation warnings in these zones:

    Zone F5L: The south boundary is Maxon Road. The west boundary is the end of the
    properties that lay on the west side of Watts Valley Road. The north boundary is the
    intersection of Watts Valley Road and Sycamore Road. The north boundary proceeds
    to the east to include the south side of Watts Valley Road. The east boundary is
    northwest of the intersection of Watts Valley Road and Maxon Road.

    Zone F5M: The south boundary includes the north side of Watts Valley Road. The west
    boundary is the east side of Anderson Ranch Road. The north boundary is the property
    at the end of Anderson Ranch Road. The east boundary lays just west of the properties
    off of Watts Valley Road.

    Zone F5N: The south boundary includes the north side of Maxon Road for half a mile
    east of its intersection with Watts Valley Road. The west boundary includes the east
    side of Watts Valley Road. The north perimeter lays south of the properties on the
    south side of High Mountain Lane.

    Zone F6A: The south boundary is at the north side of Trimmer Campground. The west
    boundary includes the east side of Maxon Road and ends east of Vincent Fire Road.

    Zone F13C: South boundary contains the properties south of Maxon Road south of
    Vincent Fire Road. The west boundary extends out to the east of the properties that lay
    on the east side of the Watts Valley Road and Maxon Road intersection. The north
    boundary contains properties on the south side of Maxon Road. The east boundary
    consists of the properties on the south side of Maxon Road about a half a mile west of
    the “Trimmer Work Center”.

    Zone F13D: South boundary consists of Trimmer Springs Road, about three quarters of
    a mile south of the “Trimmer Recreation Area”. The west boundary extends about a half
    a mile west of the “Trimmer Work Center”. The north boundary is north of Watts Creek.
    The east boundary contains properties on the west side of Maxon Road, west of
    Trimmer Springs Road.

    Zone F13E: The south and west boundary consists of the east side of Maxon Road.
    The north boundary is just south of the intersection of Vincent Fire Road and Bob’s Flat
    Trail. The east boundary extends to contain properties that lay on the east side of
    Vincent Fire Road.

    UPDATE Sept 14, 7:43 A.M.: According to Cal Fire, the creek fire has burned 212,744 acres and is 10% contained.

    UPDATE Sept 13, 4:15 P.M.: Evacuation orders due to the Creek Fire have been partially reduced to evacuation warnings for areas of Madera County Sunday afternoon, according to Madera County Sheriff’s Office.

    Officials warn that there is still a potential for evacuations and should be prepared to evacuate at a moment’s notice.

    The areas that have been lifted from evacuation orders to evacuation warnings are the following:

    -Road 222 between Road 274 and Bass Lake Dam including all spur roads such as Saddleback Road and Emory Lane (Evacuation Zone M25).

    -Road 222 between Road 226 and Road 225 including all spur roads such as Way Up Way (Evacuation Zones M32 and M31).

    -Road 223 between Road 426 and Road 221 and all spur roads such as Woodland Pond Trail, Smiley Meadows Court, Pinchot Drive, Pine Oak, Smiley Mountain Road, Northridge Road, Church Ranch Road, Taylor Ridge Road, Timberview Road, Finegold Creek Drive, Teaford Poyah, Woaka Poyah, and Hidden Meadows Road (Evacuation Zones M38, M47, M37, M46).

    -Road 221 from Road 222 to Road 200 and all spur roads such as Oak Leaf Way, Munson Lane, and Shady Oaks Drive, Kowana Lane, Pahuma Way, Nielsen Road, Quail Flats Drive, Sunridge Drive, and Klette’s Pride Way (Evacuation Zones M26, M35).

    -Road 226 between Road 221 and Road 222 and all spur roads such as Bishop Park Place, Deer Springs Lane, Walker Ranch Road, and Keller Road (Evacuation Zones M26, M23, M32).

    -Road 224 between Road 226 and Road 200 and all spur roads such as Horn Road, Mountain Springs Road, Priest Road, Wilcox Drive, Wild Plum Lane, and Quail Hollow Court (Evacuation Zones M28 and M29).

    -Road 200 between Road 221 and Road 222 and all spur roads such as Wild Plum Lane, Tahoot Drive, Maranatha Drive, Golden Acorn Court, Ellis Way, Rocky Road, and Cougar Springs Trail (Evacuation Zones M27, M28, M29, and M35).

    -Road 225 between Road 222 and Road 274 including all spur roads such as Amber Lane, Willow Creek Drive, Weatherly Lane, and Buckhorn Court (Evacuation Zone M30).


    Creek Fire Evacuation Zones
    UPDATE Sept. 13, 11:00 A.M.: Evacuation warnings were lifted Sunday morning for portions of Madera County, that include the general Highway 41 corridor between Road 200 and Bass Lake Road, known as Road 222, according to the Madera County Sheriff’s Office.

    The zones, M58 to M87 were changed to green on the Creek Fire evacuation map. All other Madera County evacuation orders and evacuation warnings remain in effect.

    Officials urge the public to remember that there remains a large amount of traffic related to the fire in the area. The public is asked to drive carefully and watch for fire suppression equipment work in the area.

  11. #111
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.yourcentralvalley.com/ne...rivers-issued/

    VISALIA, Calif. (KSEE/KGPE) — A mandatory evacuation has been issued for Three Rivers Monday due to the SQF Complex Fire according to Tulare County officials.

    Tulare County Sheriff has issued a mandatory evacuation for Three Rivers,
    south and east from 198, east to south of the Fork Campground, including South Fork Drive,
    Horn, and Cahoon Mtn. and adjacent roads, due to the SQF Complex fire activity.

    Mandatory evacuation means an immediate threat to life safety and property; all residents must
    evacuate the area.

    Evacuate north on South Fork Drive to west Old Three Rivers to head west on 198. Road
    closures are as follows:

    Highway 190 at Balch Park
    Balch Park & Bear Creek
    Balch Park & Yokohl
    Mountain 50 & 107
    Mountain 99 & Sherman Pass, Sherman Pass & Cherry
    The temporary evacuation point is at the Exeter Memorial Building, 324 N. Kaweah in Exeter.
    Tulare County Health & Human Services Agency Public Health, Behavioral Health, and Human
    Services will be present until 8:00 p.m. at this time. Anyone who needs a hotel should call 1-
    800-Red-Cross and register as an evacuee.

    Woodlake Fair/Rodeo grounds, located at 19400 Avenue 398, has been identified as the point
    of entry for large animals being evacuated. For smaller domestic animals, the Tulare County
    Animal Shelter is housing animals and staff are at the shelter at 14131 Ave. 256 in Visalia. For
    information about sheltering your small domestic animals, call Shelter Manager Cassandra
    Heffington at (559) 679-6222. The Woodlake location will be staffed until 8:00 p.m. tonight.”

  12. #112
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    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-54144651

    President Trump has dismissed concerns over climate change on a visit to fire-ravaged California, telling an official there it would "start getting cooler".

    Blazes in California, Oregon and Washington state have burned almost 2m hectares (5m acres) of land and killed at least 36 people since early August.

    Climate change sceptic Mr Trump blames the crisis on poor forest management.

    Earlier on Monday, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden called Mr Trump "a climate arsonist".

    He told an event in Delaware that four more years of his opponent in the White House would see "more of America ablaze".

    A really simple guide to climate change
    Is Trump right about the cause of US wildfires?
    During his visit to the US West Coast, Mr Trump repeated his argument that poor forest management was to blame as he met Californian officials involved in the battle against the wildfires at a stop near Sacramento, in the centre of the state.

    Dismissing one official's plea to not "ignore the science" on climate change, Mr Trump said: "It'll start getting cooler, you just watch... I don't think science knows actually."

    What else did Trump say about the climate?
    When asked by a reporter in California whether climate change was a factor in the massive wildfires, Mr Trump responded: "I think this is more of a management situation."

    He claimed that other countries had not dealt with the same level of forest fires, despite major conflagrations in Australia and the Amazon rainforest in recent years that experts attributed to the changing climate.

    They don't have problems like this," he said. "They have very explosive trees, but they don't have problems like this."

    He added: "When you get into climate change, well is India going to change its ways? And is China going to change its ways? And Russia? Is Russia going to change its ways?"

    The environment has largely been a sideline issue in the race for the White House, getting scant attention even during the Democratic primary campaign, when questions on the topic during candidate debates were few and far between.

    Washington Governor Jay Inslee, who made climate change the focus of his presidential bid, was one of the first to drop out of the race. Tom Steyer, a billionaire who self-funded his campaign, also made the issue a priority, but his campaign also never gained significant traction.

    The topic, however, is on one on which President Trump and Mr Biden have sharp and substantive disagreements. Mr Trump has previously dismissed the notion of manmade climate change as a "hoax" perpetrated by China and, while he has backed away from such rhetoric, his comments on Monday were reflective of the lack of attention he devotes to the issue.

    Mr Trump also followed through on a campaign promise to withdraw the US from the Paris Climate Agreement in the sixth month of his presidency. Mr Biden, on the other hand, says he would rejoin the Paris Agreement on the first day of his presidency and reinstate many of the environmental regulations Trump has rescinded.

    Read more from Anthony

    What's the latest on the ground?
    Authorities in California, where 25 people have died since 15 August, report that firefighters are working to contain 29 major wildfires across the state.

    They warned that the strong southerly winds and low humidity forecast for Monday could bring an elevated fire risk, and potentially have an impact on the North Complex Fire, which has scorched 106,000 hectares and is only 26% contained.

    The US National Weather Service also issued a "red flag warning" for other areas of the West Coast, including Jackson County, Oregon, where the Almeda Fire has destroyed hundreds of homes.

    The Oregon Office of Emergency Management said on Sunday that firefighters in the state were struggling to contain more than 30 active wildfires - the largest of which was more than 89km (55 miles) wide.

    At least 10 people have been killed in Oregon in the past week. Officials have said dozens of people are missing and warned that the death toll could rise.

    One person has died in Washington, where there were five large fires on Sunday.

    What are the politicians saying?
    Speaking at a meeting with Mr Trump on Monday, California Governor Gavin Newsom acknowledged that "we have not done justice on our forest management", but he said that more than half of the land in California was under federal, not state control.

    But he echoed his own statement from Friday that the fires showed the debate about climate change was "over".

    "The hots are getting hotter, the dries are getting drier," he said. "We submit the science is in and observed evidence is self-evident: that climate change is real and that is exacerbating this."

    Oregon Governor Kate Brown has said her state is facing "the perfect firestorm" and called the moment "truly the bellwether for climate change on the West Coast.

    "And this is a wake-up call for all of us that we have got to do everything in our power to tackle climate change."

    In pictures: Oregon fires force thousands to flee
    Smoke from California wildfires turns skies orange
    False claims about Oregon fires spread online
    A really simple guide to climate change
    Washington Governor Jay Inslee described the situation as "apocalyptic" and condemned Mr Trump's stance on the climate.

    Image copyrightREUTERS
    Image caption
    Six of the 20 largest fires on record in California have all occurred this year
    At an election campaign event in Nevada on Saturday, President Trump said he was praying for everyone throughout the West Coast affected by the wildfires.

    But he insisted the blazes were "about forest management", which includes tree thinning and brush clearing.

    "They never had anything like this," he said. "Please remember the words, very simple, forest management."

    Mr Trump has previously called climate change "mythical", "non-existent", or "an expensive hoax" - but has also described it as a "serious subject".

    He has decided to pull the US out of the Paris climate agreement, which committed the US and 187 other countries to keeping a global temperature rise this century well below 2C (3.6F) above pre-industrial levels.

    What role is climate change playing?
    BBC environment correspondent Matt McGrath says that while natural factors such as strong winds have helped the spread of the West Coast fires, the underlying heating of the climate from human activities is making these conflagrations bigger and more explosive.

    Nine of the world's 10 warmest years on record have occurred since 2005, and the UN warned this week that the five years from 2016 until this year will very likely be the hottest such period yet recorded. Both Oregon and California have warmed by more than 1C since 1900.

    The sustained warmth has seen six of the 20 largest fires on record in California all occur this year. In Oregon, the spate of fires burned almost twice the amount of average annual losses in a week.

    In California, a prolonged drought over the past decade has killed millions of trees, turning them into potent fuel for the fires. Mountain regions that are normally cooler and wetter have dried out more rapidly in the summer, adding to the potential fuel load.

  13. #113
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    https://fox40.com/news/local-news/vo...o-fight-blaze/

    BUTTE COUNTY, Calif. (KTXL) — With burned out cars on the roadways and burnt homes, it seems almost everyone in Berry Creek lost something to the North Complex fire.

    And firefighters battling the flames are no exception.

    In his 28 years as a volunteer firefighter, Chief Reed Rankin has battled more than his fair share of flames.

    “We seen the community of Paradise burn up and that was always in the back of our mind,” Rankin told FOX40. “If we get a wind event up here and there’s a fire, we’re going to be in trouble.”

    His worst nightmare came knocking Tuesday as the North Complex fire closed in on Berry Creek.

    Rankin went door to door racing to evacuate his neighbors.

    “We told them, ‘Get in your car and go now. You have no time.’” Rankin said.

    He didn’t even consider the fate of his own house until the next morning.

    “I found out my home burned down. Everything you ever had collected, all your photo albums, everything you ever had in your life was just right there and it’s all gone,” Rankin said.

    And he’s not alone.

    Six of the seven volunteer firefighters in the town lost their homes too.

    Rankin’s business making water wells was also destroyed, along with their fire station and equipment.

    But rather than call it quits, he continues to fight the blaze.

    “I don’t want to take any time off because I don’t want to sit there and think about what I lost,” Rankin said. “So, I’m just going to stay here and help my community.”

    So, everyday he continues to fight the flames patrolling hotspots to prevent any further damage.

    After all, he plans to come back to his hometown and make it feel like home once again.

    “We’re just going to pick up our pieces. We’re going to stay strong and we’re going to try to rebuild as best as we can,” Rankin said.

    Rankin did not have homeowners insurance so friends have started a GoFundMe page to help.

    If you would like to help, click or tap here.

  14. #114
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    https://fox40.com/news/local-news/re...tional-forest/

    GEORGETOWN, Calif. (KTXL) — With so many fires burning at the same time, resources have been spread thin across the state.

    As of Monday, the Fork Fire had been burning for a week and started out with just 59 crewmembers assigned to fighting it.

    Recently, that number has jumped to 300 personnel, with some of those first responders camping out at a command center, standing ready in case flames spread.

    As of Monday night, the Fork Fire was 7% contained. There is concern the wind could push the fire past containment lines and into residential areas, something crews are working hard to avoid.

    For those that live in Quintette, they worry about reliving a scene of the past.

    “It’s so stressful,” said resident Danny Campbell.

    It was just six years ago when flames from the King Fire forced them to evacuate. The burn scar can still be seen near the Stumpy Meadows Reservoir.

    Now, there’s concern the same area can engulf again, with its rugged slopes, thick vegetation and burned trees that remain from the 2014 blaze.

    “It’s super steep terrain and there are literally millions of snags that are still standing from the fire,” said Steven Lasky, with the Bureau of Land Management. “Creates a great hazard, a great danger to firefighters.”

    The concern Monday night was the wind. It tested containment lines that have held the fire to just over 1,700 acres.

    So, federal and state agencies have called in reinforcements to protect properties outside the Eldorado National Forest.

    “In the beginning of this fire, we had a real problem getting resources for obvious reasons. The whole west is burning,” Lasky told FOX40. “We only had 59 people on the fire, no air support at all. So over the past four days, we’ve kind of increased on the priority scale.”

    Some homeowners in Quintette already spent part of last week in an emergency shelter as flames burned to the west.

    “It was kind of a panic and a rush,” Campbell recalled. “Everybody packed up their stuff and followed each other down the canyon.”

    Those evacuation orders have since been lifted but fire officials said the threat to area homes is not over.

    Neighbors have had their to-go bags waiting by the front door just in case they need to leave in a moment’s notice.

    “I have clothes packed and I have the papers ready. So if it does come in here, I’m out of here,” said Quintette resident Jim Rommel.

  15. #115
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    https://www.sgvtribune.com/2020/09/1...ect-mt-wilson/

    The battle to control the Bobcat fire hit a hitch when the blaze’s containment went in reverse and was cut in half to 3%, Angeles National Forest officials said on Tuesday, Sept. 15.

    The fire had grown to 41,231 acres, with firefighters working through the night to protect the Mount Wilson Observatory, the historic landmark with communication equipment at its peak.

    Protecting the observatory remained a focus for Tuesday’s firefighting operations.

    “Today’s primary focus remains at keeping the fire from reaching Mount Wilson and the foothill communities,” the national forest said in a Tuesday morning update.

    Previous
    The drop in percent containment was “due to fire growth,” the national forest stated.

    Authorities on Monday were increasingly concerned that the Bobcat, which started Sept. 6, had gotten close enough to threaten Mount Wilson and the observatory, but said fire crews were working to keep it at bay.

    Tuesday morning, observatory officials were optimistic.

    “The observatory boundaries are still secure at this time and we have 12 companies of professionals from @LACOFDintending to keep it that way,” the observatory announced in on Twitter. “It’s shaping up to be a good day for aerial action, too.”



    National forest authorities said aircraft would be used more as visibility improved.

    An evacuation order ordered Sunday for some Sierra Madre and Arcadia residents remained in effect. Evacuation warnings were still in effect as well for parts of the foothill communities of Monrovia, Bradbury, Sierra Madre, Altadena, Duarte and Pasadena.

    Authorities had estimated the fire would be contained by Oct. 15 but on Monday pushed that date back to Oct. 30.

  16. #116
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    https://www.kron4.com/wildfires/bay-...tainment-size/

    SAN FRANCISCO (KRON) — Nearly 13,000 firefighters are continuing to make progress towards containment on 22 major fires and lightning complexes in California.

    At this time, over 12,400 people remain evacuated.

    Firefighters are closely monitoring weather conditions, as extreme heat is expected to grip the area over the weekend.

    Since the lightning siege that started on Saturday, August 15, 2020, there have been nearly 14,000 lightning strikes. During this time-period, there have been more than 900 new wildfires, which have now burned over 1.5 million acres. There have been 8 fatalities and over 3,200 structures destroyed.

    Size: 86,509 acres
    Containment: 91%
    Injuries: 1
    Fatalities: 1
    Structures Destroyed: 1,490
    Structures Threatened: 3,837
    Structures Damaged: 140

    UC Santa Cruz Update: On Wednesday evening, evacuation orders were lifted for the University of California, Santa Cruz. Operations will resume ‘through a phased opening,’ according to the chancellor and the chief of police.

    CZU Evacuation Order, Warning Map

    Evacuation Orders
    San Mateo County
    Butano Community Area
    Butano State Park Area including Barranca Knolls Community
    South Skyline Blvd. area near Hwy 9
    Western areas of San Mateo County
    Santa Cruz County
    Waterman Gap Loop, Upper HWY 236, Boulder Creek Golf Course, Heartwood Hill, Lodge Road, Community of Little Basin, Lower China Grade, Upper China Grade, Community of Kings Hwy, Lower Jamison Creek, Gallion Heights, Fallen Leaf Neighborhood, Foxglove Lane (Zones CRZ10, CRZ13B, BOU20, BOU30, BOU31, BOU36, BOU37, BOU21) (8/18/2020 10 pm)
    Saratoga Toll Road, San Lorenzo Park, Riverside Grove-Community of Teilh Drive, Wildwood Road (Zones: BOU-38) (8/18/2020 10:00 pm)
    Everyone on Empire Grade Road, from Felton Empire north, all of Pine Flat Road, all of Ice Cream Grade, Bonny Doon Road, in between Pine Flat Road, Martin Road, and all associated side streets are under an evacuation order. (Zones: CRZ-1, CRZ-2, CRZ-3, CRZ-4, CRZ-5B, CRZ-11B, CRZ-12B) (8/19/2020 1:00 am)
    Bonny Doon south of Ice Cream Grade, to include Pine Flat Road South. (CRZ6) (8/19/2020 1:00 am)
    Areas of Alba Road, Hubbard Gulch and Fanning Grade. (BEN-1C) (8/19/2020 6:00 pm)
    Area in BEN-2, specifically Valley View Road
    Areas of Boulder Creek (Zones: BOU-14B, BOU-16, BOU-22)
    Evacuation Warnings
    San Mateo County
    Zones SMC 49
    Zones SMC EO42, SMC EO24A
    Areas north of Canyon Road – Zones SMC E98A
    Loma Mar and Dearborn Parks areas – Zones SMC 18A
    Communities of Loma Mar and Dearborn Park
    Pescadero Creek County Park Area
    Butano Creek Drainage
    Areas of west San Mateo County – Zones SMC E038A, SMC E038B
    Santa Cruz County
    East edge of Bear Creek (Zones: BOU-8A, BOU-13, BOU-25, BOU-26, CRZ-14B)
    Areas in Boulder Creek and Brookdale (Zones: BOU-1-7, BOU-8B, BOU-9, BOU-9C, BOU-10, BOU-11A, BOU-12, BOU-14AB, BOU-15, BOU-17, BOU18 CRZ-9C, CRZ-11ABC, CRZ-13A, FEL-4B)
    Black Ranch Road area (Zone:CRZ-9C)
    Big Basin Way (Zone: CRZ-13A)
    Areas south of Bonny Doon (Zone: CRZ-6B)
    Areas on the eastern fire’s edge (Zones: FEL- 3B, CRZ- 12A, BEN- 1A, BEN- 1B)
    Areas of Boulder Creek (Zones: CRZ- 13B, CRZ- 14C, BOU- 19, BOU- 23, BOU-24, BOU- 32, BOU- 33, BOU- 34, BOU- 35, BOU- 39, BOU- 40, BOU- 41, BOU- 42, BOU-43)
    Areas of Bonny Doon, (Zones: CRZ- 5A, CRZ- 7, CRZ- 8)
    Evacuation Centers
    Santa Cruz County
    Santa Cruz County Fairground, 2601 E. Lake Avenue in Watsonville
    Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium, 307 Church Street, Santa Cruz (AT CAPACITY)
    Seventh Day Adventist Camp Grounds, 1931 Soquel San Jose Rd (AT CAPACITY)
    Cabrillo College, 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos CA
    Santa Cruz Bible Church, 440 Frederick Street, Santa Cruz
    Simpkins Family Swim Center, 919 17th Ave (ADA only)
    Twin Lakes Church, 2701 Cabrillo College Drive
    Congregational Church Shelter, 4951 Soquel Drive in Soquel
    Harbor High School, 300 La Fonda Ave., Santa Cruz
    Rodeway Inn, 1620 West Beach St., Watsonville
    Animal Evacuation Centers
    Santa Cruz County Fairgrounds, 2601 E. Lake Avenue in Watsonville
    Large farm animals are being accepted at Cowpalace. For information and assistance contact (650) 450-0520
    Watsonville Animal Shelter, 580 Airport Blvd
    Road Closures
    San Mateo County
    State Route 1 at Gazos Creek
    Cloverdale Road between Pescadero Creek Road and Gazos Creek.
    Pescadero Creek Road at Butano cut off
    Pescadero Creek Road at Burns Valley Road
    Santa Cruz County
    State Route 1 at Shaffer Road to Ano Nuevo
    State Route 9 at Lower Glen Arbor to Rincon Trail head
    Empire Grade at Heller Drive
    Upper Zayante South closed at State Route 35
    Hutchinson Road at State Route 35
    State Route 35 at Bear Creek Rd to Boulder Creek
    Mount Hermon Road at Locatelli Lane to Graham Hill Road
    Graham Hill Road at Lockewood Lane to State Route 9
    Westbound Mount Hermon at Glen Canyon Rd to Graham Hill Road
    LNU Lightning Complex (Lake, Sonoma, Napa, Solano counties)

    Size: 363,220 acres
    Containment: 96%
    Injuries: 4 civilians, 1 first responder
    Fatalities: 5
    Structures Destroyed: 1,491
    Structures Threatened: 1,350
    Structures Damaged: 232

    >>>DAMAGE STATUS: CLICK HERE for LNU Lightning Complex Structure Damage Status Map

    This complex includes:

    Hennessey Fire in Napa and Lake County (merged with Gamble, Green, Markley, Spanish, Aetna, Round, Morgan Fires): 317,909 acres; 89% contained
    Walbridge Fire in Sonoma County (merged with Stewarts): 54,940 acres; 94% contained
    Meyers Fire in Sonoma County: 2,360 acres; 100% contained
    LNU Evacuation Order, Warning Map

    Evacuation Orders
    Napa County
    Berryessa-Knoxville Road from Eastside Road to the Napa/Lake county line (this does not include Eastside Road)
    Evacuation Warnings
    Colusa County
    Zone C2

    All area and residents North of Colusa/Yolo County line, east of SR 16, west of Sand Creek/Green Road, and South of the dead-end of Spring Valley Road
    Lake County
    East of Middletown Area
    East of Hwy 29
    North of Lake / Napa County line
    South of Butts Canyon Road
    East of Cailayomi Road to Western Mine Road
    St. Helena Creek Rd
    North of Lower Lake Area
    North of Morgan Valley Road
    East of the Intersection of Morgan Valley Road and Sky High Ridge Road
    South of HWY 20
    West of the Lake/Colusa/ Yolo County lines
    South of Lower Lake Area
    South of Morgan Valley Rd.
    East of Chimney Rock/ Canyon Rd.
    North of Jerusalem Grade Rd. extending to Lake/Napa County line
    West of the Lake/Napa County line
    Middletown Area
    East of Guenoc Winery Rd.
    North Butts Canyon Rd.
    South of Grange Rd.
    West of Lake/Napa County line
    South of Butts Canyon Rd. to Cailayomi Rd.
    East of St. Helena Creek Rd.
    North of HWY 29
    West of Cailayomi Rd. extending to Western Mine Road.
    Napa County
    Properties on the east side of Silverado Trail from Rosedale Road to Deer Park Road
    Howell Mountain Road (AKA Old Howell Mountain Road) from Conn ValleyRoad up to the intersection of White Cottage Road
    Howell Mountain Road from Deer Park Road to Pope Valley Road, including the community of Angwin
    White Cottage Road
    Ink Grade from White Cottage Road to Pope Valley Road
    Chiles Pope Valley Road from 128 to Pope Valley Road, Pope Valley Road to Aetna Springs Road, all roads in between, including Lower Chiles ValleyRoad
    Pope Canyon Road from Pope Valley Road to Hardin Road, to include Hardin Road and Dollarhide Road
    Butts Canyon Road from Aetna Springs Road to the Napa/Lake County line
    Snell Valley Road, including Berryessa Estates sub-division
    Soda Canyon from Loma Vista to 3700 Soda Canyon Road (Dead End)
    Atlas Peak from 2462 Atlas Peak Road (Bubbling Wells Pet Cemetery) to the dead end.
    Deer Park Road from Silverado Trail to the intersection of White CottageRoad and Howell Mountain Road. This will include the community of Deer Park, Glass Mountain, Crystal Springs, and St. Helena Hospital
    Highway 128 (Capell Valley Road/Sage Canyon Rd) from Chiles PopeValley Road to Wragg Canyon Road. (Wragg Canyon Road remains closed and under an Evacuation Order)
    Highway 121 (Monticello Road) from Vichy Avenue to Highway 128 (Moskowite Corners)
    Berryessa Knoxville Road from Highway 128 (at Turtle Rock) to SpanishFlat Loop Road, to include Spanish Flat Loop
    Solano County
    Yolo County
    Zone 1 – All area of zone west of fires edge
    Zone 2 – West of SR 16 North of Rumsey Canyon Rd.
    Evacuation Centers
    Lake County
    Kelseyville High School parking lot: 5480 Main Street in Kelseyville
    Napa County
    Crosswalk Community Church at 2590 First Street in Napa
    Sonoma County
    Santa Rosa Fairgrounds: 1350 Bennett Valley Road in Santa Rosa
    Petaluma Veterans Building: 1094 Petaluma Blvd in South Petaluma
    Animal Evacuation Centers
    Napa County
    Napa County Animal Shelter at 942 Hartle Court in Napa
    Valley Brook Equestrian Center at 1132 EL Centro Ave. in Napa
    Napa Valley Horseman’s Association at 1200 Foster Road in Napa
    Ag 4 Youth at 1200 Foster Rd. in Napa
    Solano County
    Vallejo Fairgrounds, 900 Fairgrounds Drive, Vallejo (large animals, current count 211 animals)
    Solano County Animal Shelter, 2510 Claybank Rd (small animals only, current count 285 animals)
    Kelseyville High School parking lot 5480 Main Street Kelseyville, CA
    Road Closures
    Lake County
    Lower Lake
    Morgan Valley Road eastbound at Sky High Ridge Rd.
    Spruce Grove Road (north) eastbound at SR 29
    Clayton Creek Road eastbound at SR 29
    Hofacker Lane eastbound at SR 29
    Lake Ridge Road northbound at Morgan Valley Road
    A Street eastbound at SR 29
    Hidden Valley Lake
    Spruce Grove Road (south) eastbound at SR 29
    Hartman Road eastbound at SR 29
    Grange Road eastbound at SR 29
    Middletown
    Butts Canyon Road eastbound at SR 29
    Napa County
    SR-121 at Circle Oaks — closed Eastbound
    SR-128 at Napa/Solano county line — No traffic westbound
    Butts Canyon Road at Guenoc
    SR-128 at Silverado Trail
    Atlas Peak Road at Circle R Ranch
    Howell Mountain Road
    Deer Park at Silverado Trail
    Glass Mountain Road and Silverado Trail
    Crystal Springs at Silverado Trail
    SR-128 at County Line (Putah Creek Bridge)

  17. #117
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    https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/15/us/we...day/index.html

    (CNN)Two people found dead near their destroyed home were packed and ready to evacuate the North Complex Fire in Northern California last week but changed their minds based on erroneous information, Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea said Tuesday.

    Six days ago, Philip Ruble, 68, was found inside of burned-up Toyota pickup at the home and Millicent Catarncuic, 77 was found in a nearby embankment, according to the sheriff.
    "After speaking to family members, it is believed the pair was aware of the fire in the area," Honea said. "They had packed their belongings in preparation to evacuate but later decided not to evacuate based on erroneous information that the fire was 51% contained."
    The pair lived in Berry Creek, which has been all but decimated by the Bear Fire, part of the North Complex.

    Berry Creek was under an evacuation order as of 3:15 p.m. PT last Tuesday. The information was posted on social media sites and on the fire information line, and transmitted via ham radio. Deputies also went through the area with evacuation sirens and door to door where possible, Butte County spokeswoman Megan McCann told CNN.
    It is unknown where the couple saw or heard the containment figure. The number is not typically part of evacuation orders. The fire also quickly grew the day the couple died.

    The North Complex Fire has caused 15 fatalities, with 13 people currently unaccounted for. It has been burning for close to a month and is the eighth largest in California history, having charred 273,000 acres and burned down more than 780 structures, including the Berry Creek Elementary School.
    One firefighter has been injured.
    Man survives flames but loses farm
    Eddie Campos watched helplessly as flames raced toward his family farm in Jamul, California.
    "We called for air support. We called for ground support. We called for chopper support. And we couldn't get no help at all," Campos said.

    Soon, his farm was engulfed in flames. But his family was lucky. At least 34 people have died in the Western wildfires, which have torched more than 4.7 million acres. That's more land than six Rhode Islands.
    The National Interagency Fire Center said at least 87 wildfires are burning in 11 states. Many are filling the sky with choking smoke and pushing firefighters beyond exhaustion.
    "We have so many brave firefighters who are working unending hours to try to contain these fires," Sacramento Mayor Darrell Steinberg said Tuesday.
    Wildfires are ravaging the West coast. Here's how you can help
    Wildfires are ravaging the West coast. Here's how you can help
    "We are living through an unprecedented situation here on the West Coast and in California."
    Before Campos and his family fled, "we went down the street to help a neighbor rescue eight horses," Campos said.
    "We grabbed nine dogs. We helped get some chickens out -- I think there were about nine or 10 chickens," he said. "It's a real tight community, and we worked together to rescue animals before we left this place."

  18. #118
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    https://krcrtv.com/news/local/victim...n-cars-roadway

    OROVILLE, Calif. (AP) — A 72-year-old man found dead in a vehicle and two other people discovered on a roadway were among the latest victims of the deadliest wildfire in California this year.

    Fifteen people were killed last week in the North Complex fire burning about 125 miles (200 kilometers) northeast of San Francisco. One person remained missing, the Butte County sheriff’s office said late Wednesday.

    DNA testing was used to positively identify 12 of the victims, Sheriff Kory Honea said. They included Jacob Albright, 72, of Feather Falls, whose body was found in a vehicle on a property in the community.

    The two bodies in the roadway were found in Berry Creek — one about 10 feet from an all-terrain vehicle, the other also near a vehicle, Honea said. One of them was identified as Paul Winer, 68, while the other has not been identified.



    California Gov. Gavin Newsom said Wednesday that more than 17,000 firefighters were battling some 25 major fires that were ignited in the past month, after an unprecedented lightning siege in mid-August.

    The death toll stands at 25, with at least 4,200 structures destroyed statewide and more than 38,000 people under evacuation.

    Newsom said environmental stewardship is not a partisan issue in the state that has had governors from both major political parties.

    “We need to reconcile the fact there are no Democratic thermometers and no Republican thermometers,” he said about global warming.

    In Butte County, winds thrashed the fire into explosive growth on Sept. 8, driving it through rugged Sierra Nevada foothills and destroying much of the town of Berry Creek.

    Two people found on a 5-acre property in Berry Creek couldn’t escape fast enough, Honea said. The body of Philip Rubel, 68, was found inside a burned pickup truck, and Millicent Catarancuic, 77, was discoered down an embankment.

    “They had packed their belongings in preparation to evacuate but later decided not to evacuate based on erroneous information that the fire was 51% contained,” Honea said.

    The two lived on the compound with Catarancuic’s sister, Suzan Violet Zurz, who remained missing.

    Others killed in the fire were Randy Harrell, 67, of Feather Falls and Mark De La Gardie, 61, Ken Lee, 64, John Butler, 79, Sandra Butler, 75, Jorge Hernandez-Juarez, 26, Khawar Bhatti, 58, and Josiah Williams, 16, all of Berry Creek.

  19. #119
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.yourcentralvalley.com/ne...-12-contained/

    TULARE COUNTY, Calif. (KSEE/KGPE) ? The SQF Complex Fire continues to burn through the Sequoia National Forest on Thursday as officials release a structure assessment contact form for residents affected by the fire.

    The fire, consisting of the larger Castle Fire and the smaller Shotgun Fire, has scorched a total of 122,835 acres and is 12% contained as of Thursday morning.

    A total of 3,183 people have been evacuated from the fire zone, while 3,483 structures are threatened and 150 structures have been destroyed.

    The blaze began on Aug. 19 from lightning.

    The western flank of the fire continues to be the top priority for crews as it continues to exhibit ?active? fire behavior.

    With a break in the weather, firefighters were able to establish and strengthen control lines along the fire?s edge.
    SQF Complex Fire Structure Damage Assessment Contact Form

    Incident command reported that the Castle Fire crossed Highway 190 near Cedar Slope in multiple areas, officials said. Through the day and night, fire crews worked to improve and strengthen contingency lines in the area.

    A 10-acre spot fire was also reported near Little Horse Meadows. Crews worked through the night to secure the area.

    Firefighters expect to continue working near Lion Meadows to secure that section of fire.

    Crews reported they are preparing for the fire?s likely movement toward Ponderosa, Tule Indian Reservation and north into Sequoia National Park, which closed to visitors on Monday as a precaution.

    Tulare County has a structure assessment form for residents affected by the SQF Complex Fire.

    Officials said the purpose of the form is so county officials will have resident?s contact information and can be contacted ?as quickly as information is available.?

    It was stressed that damage assessment will begin as soon as it is safe for personnel to enter the burned area.

    A total of 1,260 personnel, consisting of 73 engines, 27 water tenders, 14 helicopters, 20 hand crews, 19 dozers and eight other units are on the fire lines.

    Current road closures are as follows:

    Highway 190 at Rio Vista Road/Bridge Lane in Springville
    Balch Park & Bear Creek
    Balch Park & Yokohl
    Mountain 50 & 107
    Mountain 99 & Sherman Pass, Sherman Pass & Cherry
    Cherokee Oaks off Highway 198
    Highway 198 in Three Rivers through Woodward Gate on the Generals Highway

    Evacuation orders are in place for the following communities:

    Pyles Boys Camp
    Ponderosa
    Sequoia Crest
    Alpine Village
    Redwood Drive
    Lloyd Meadows
    Cedar Slope
    Camp Nelson
    Rogers Camp
    Mountain Aire
    Pierpoint
    Doyle Springs
    Mountain Home
    Coy Flat
    Highway 190 along the south from the intersection of Balch Park Road, north to Blue Ridge Lookout, east to Moses Mountain, and south to Highway 190 at Mahogany Flat
    Portions of Three Rivers, including south and east from 198, east to south of the Fork Campground, including South Fork Drive, Horn, Cinnamon Canyon, and Cahoon Mountain, and adjacent roads

    Evacuation warnings are also in place for the following areas:

    Remaining areas of Three Rivers that do not fall under the mandatory evacuation order
    Springville (All points between Globe Drive and Balch Park Road)
    Silver City
    Mineral King

    Temporary evacuation points have been established at:

    Porterville: Porterville Community College, 100 E. College Ave. Porterville, CA. (831) 220-4477
    Exeter: Exeter Memorial building, 324 N. Kaweah Ave. Exeter, CA. (831) 220-4477

    Animal evacuation points:

    Small animal: Tulare County Animal Shelter, 14131 Ave 256 Visalia, CA (559) 636-4050
    Large animal:
    South County ? Porterville Fairgrounds, 2400 Teapot Dome Ave. Porterville, CA.
    North County ? Woodlake Rodeo grounds, 19400 Ave 398 Woodlake, CA. (Livestock)

  20. #120
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.yourcentralvalley.com/ne...s-air-quality/

    KINGS CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Calif. (KSEE/KGPE) — Officials announced that Kings Canyon National Park will close to all visitors Thursday evening due to smoke impacts and hazardous air quality throughout the park from wildfires in the area.

    The park’s entrance station, facilities and parking lots will close at 5 p.m., said spokeswoman Sintia Kawasaki-Yee. Yosemite announced on Thursday it would also close, while Sequoia closed on Tuesday.
    Yosemite to close due to ‘significant’ smoke impacts and hazardous air quality

    The closure is expected to last at least through the weekend as unhealthy to hazardous air quality is expected over the next several days.

    The National Park Service expects to reopen Kings Canyon to visitors when conditions improve and it is safe for visitors and employees.

  21. #121
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    https://abc7.com/firefighter-dies-ba...eveal/6436479/


    YUCAIPA, Calif. (KABC) -- A firefighter died battling the El Dorado Fire in the San Bernardino National Forest, officials said Friday.

    The U.S. Forest Service said the death happened Thursday, but did not release more details.

    "Our deepest sympathies are with the family, friends and fellow firefighters during this time," the agency said in a statement.

    The name of the firefighter has not been released until family has been notified. The cause of the death was under investigation.

    A procession was held Friday afternoon for the firefighter who died battling the blaze.

    The El Dorado Fire, which erupted Sept. 5 near Yucaipa, has burned more than 21,000 acres and was 66% contained as of Friday afternoon. Crews are trying to stop flames from crossing Highway 38.

    Officials said the blaze was caused by a smoke-generating pyrotechnic device used during a gender reveal party.

    The mandatory evacuation areas include Angelus Oaks, Seven Oaks and an area to the east past Sugarloaf Mountain and the Heart Bar Campground.

    Some evacuation orders were lifted Friday just to the south of that area, for the communities of Mountain Home Village and Forest Falls. Those communities remain under an evacuation warning and only residents with ID can access the area.

  22. #122

  23. #123
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    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/bob...-desert-homes/


    The massive Bobcat Fire burning in the Angeles National Forest continues to threaten homes in the Antelope Valley Monday.

    The blaze, now raging into its third week, has scorched 105,345 acres, or 165 square miles, and remains at 15% containment.

    More than 1,700 firefighting resources have been assigned to the inferno, including 227 engine and 10 water tenders, according to the U.S. Forest Service?s incident information page.

    A fixed-wing aircraft battling the blaze was grounded after a drone was spotted, officials said. They warned that firefighting aircraft must stay grounded until the area is cleared.

    Last week, flames came dangerously close to the Mt. Wilson Observatory, but it was pushing toward Highway 2. And over the weekend, it destroyed the nature center at Devil?s Punchbowl Natural Area, a geological wonder that attracts some 130,000 visitors a year.

    On Monday afternoon, a flare-up was burning in the Chantry Flat area above Arcadia, creating large plumes of smoke.

    Flames could be seen near power poles as an aircraft made water drops, aerial video from Sky5 showed.

    Homes are now threatened on the north end of the fire, in the Antelope Valley, as the blaze continued to grow to the west and east, officials said.

    ?The fire will continue to spread from the foothills into communities of Juniper Hills, Valyermo and Big Pine,? according to Inciweb. Additionally, the communities of Littlerock and Wrightwood ?will be impacted soon,? officials said.

    The fire also threatens containment lines north of the recent Ranch 2 Fire and the Highway 39 corridor.

    Dry conditions and low humidity, coupled with warm overnight temperatures, mean the fire will burn through the night, officials said.

    Winds are expected to spread the blaze downslope, causing spotting, rapid growth and structure threats.


    A cooling trend is expected to last through mid-week, but humidity in the area remains relatively low. And while winds have subsided slightly, gusts reached 30 mph in some areas.


    Evacuation orders
    Residents of the following areas remain under evacuation orders:

    Angeles Crest Highway, between Angeles Forest Highway and Highway 39.
    The unincorporated areas of Juniper Hills, Devils Punch Bowl and Paradise Springs.
    The unincorporated areas of Crystal Lake, East Fork of the San Gabriel River and Camp Willams.
    South of Highway 138, north of Big Rock Creek, east of 87th Street East and West of Largo Vista Road.
    South of 138th Street East, north of Big Pine Highway and Highway 2, east of Largo Vista Road and west of 263rd Street East.
    South of Highway 138, north of East Avenue W-14, east of 155th Street East and West of 165th Street East.
    South and west of Upper Big Tujunga.
    East of Angeles Forest Highway.
    North of Angeles Crest Highway.
    Evacuation warnings
    Residents of the following areas are under evacuation warnings:

    City of Pasadena.
    Unincorporated communities of Altadena and Wrightwood.
    South of Pearblossom Highway, east and north of Angeles Forest Highway, north and west of Mt. Emma Road, east and south of Highway 22 and west of Cheseboro Road.
    South of Highway 2, north of Blue Ridge Truck Trail, east of Highway 39 and West of the Los Angeles County border.
    South of Avenue U-8, north of East Avenue W-14, east of 121st East and west of 155th Street East.
    South of Pearblossom Highway, south and east of Pearblossom Highway, north and west of Mt. Emma Road, north and east of Angeles Forest Highway and west of Cheseboro Road.
    South of Mt. Emma Road, north of Upper Big Tujunga Canyon Road, east of Angeles Forest Highway and west of Pacifico Mountain.
    An evacuation center is located at Palmdale High School, 2137 East Avenue R.

    Accommodations for large animals are available at the Antelope Valley Fairgrounds, 2551 West Avenue H in Lancaster.

    Anyone in need of assistance can call the Disaster Distress Hotline at 800-675-5799.

    The blaze started Sept. 6 near the Cogswell Dam and West Fork day use area. The cause remains under investigation.

    Officials will be holding a virtual public meeting on the blaze at 6:30 p.m. Monday.

  24. #124
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Geeze. I didn't even know there was a thread on this. The Bobcat Fire has been affecting my breathing for two weeks and I have a client directly in the line of it. I'm waiting to hear when we'll have to help them evacuate because they're literally right up against the mountain. The shit is insane.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

  25. #125
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    https://abc7.com/lack-of-resources-o...pread/6518084/

    MONROVIA, Calif. (KABC) -- The raging Bobcat Fire that erupted two weeks ago in the San Gabriel Mountains is now one of the largest ever in Los Angeles County after burning more than 113,000 acres.

    On Wednesday morning, the blaze was 38% contained and had burned about 113,307 acres, fire officials said.

    Officials said a lack of resources allowed the Bobcat Fire to make a run through the mountains in the initial hours after it started. They say by the time staffing ramped up, flames were already deep in an old-growth forest where the fire had plenty to burn.

    The fire has destroyed or damaged at least 29 structures, many of them believed to be homes, and that number could climb into the 80s as the fire continues to spread and as fire officials continue to get a more accurate survey of its devastation, officials said.

    The U.S. Forest Service said lighter winds and cooler temperatures with higher humidity helped them in the firefight Tuesday. The National Weather Service expects warmer and drier conditions for Wednesday and Thursday, with southwesterly and up canyon winds.

    A smoke advisory was extended through Wednesday warning of unhealthy air in the San Gabriel Mountains, and for sensitive individuals in the San Gabriel Valley, Santa Clarita Valley and Antelope Valley.

    Firefighters on Tuesday set backfires to protect the Mount Wilson Observatory, which played a key role in advancing 20th century astrophysics since it was founded in 1904. Mount Wilson is also home to an estimated $1 billion worth of transmission towers, a key site for TV, radio and government agencies.

    The U.S. Forest Service reported Tuesday afternoon that the defensive firing operation was "going well at Mt. Wilson. They're using aerial ignitions to increase the buffer between HWY 2 near Barley Flat to Big Tujunga Road."

    Evacuation orders were added for residents south and west of Upper Big Tujunga Canyon Road; east of Angeles Forest Highway; and north of Angeles Crest (2) Highway, according to the sheriff's department.

    Evacuation orders remained in place for the following areas:

    -- along Angeles Crest Highway, between Angeles Forest Highway and Highway 39
    -- in the unincorporated areas and communities of Juniper Hills, Crystal Lake, East Fork of the San GabrielRiver, Camp Williams, Valyermo and Llano (except for the Longview section, which is under an evacuation warning)
    -- south and west of Upper Big Tujunga Canyon Road, east of Angeles Forest Highway and north of Angeles Crest Highway


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    Bobcat Fire: Lack of resources, old-growth forest helped blaze spread quickly
    The Bobcat Fire has destroyed or damaged at least 29 structures, and that number could climb into the 80s.
    Updated an hour ago

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    A lack of firefighting resources in the hours after the Bobcat Fire was sparked allowed the fast-moving blaze to make a run through the mountains, officials say.

    MONROVIA, Calif. (KABC) -- The raging Bobcat Fire that erupted two weeks ago in the San Gabriel Mountains is now one of the largest ever in Los Angeles County after burning more than 113,000 acres.

    On Wednesday morning, the blaze was 38% contained and had burned about 113,307 acres, fire officials said.

    Officials said a lack of resources allowed the Bobcat Fire to make a run through the mountains in the initial hours after it started. They say by the time staffing ramped up, flames were already deep in an old-growth forest where the fire had plenty to burn.

    The fire has destroyed or damaged at least 29 structures, many of them believed to be homes, and that number could climb into the 80s as the fire continues to spread and as fire officials continue to get a more accurate survey of its devastation, officials said.

    The U.S. Forest Service said lighter winds and cooler temperatures with higher humidity helped them in the firefight Tuesday. The National Weather Service expects warmer and drier conditions for Wednesday and Thursday, with southwesterly and up canyon winds.

    A smoke advisory was extended through Wednesday warning of unhealthy air in the San Gabriel Mountains, and for sensitive individuals in the San Gabriel Valley, Santa Clarita Valley and Antelope Valley.

    RELATED: Cause of Bobcat Fire remains under investigation, but here's what we know so far

    Firefighters on Tuesday set backfires to protect the Mount Wilson Observatory, which played a key role in advancing 20th century astrophysics since it was founded in 1904. Mount Wilson is also home to an estimated $1 billion worth of transmission towers, a key site for TV, radio and government agencies.

    The U.S. Forest Service reported Tuesday afternoon that the defensive firing operation was "going well at Mt. Wilson. They're using aerial ignitions to increase the buffer between HWY 2 near Barley Flat to Big Tujunga Road."

    Don't have our app? Download the ABC7 Los Angeles app on your iPhone or Android device and opt into push notifications to get the latest updates on Southern California fires.

    Evacuation orders were added for residents south and west of Upper Big Tujunga Canyon Road; east of Angeles Forest Highway; and north of Angeles Crest (2) Highway, according to the sheriff's department.

    Evacuation orders remained in place for the following areas:

    -- along Angeles Crest Highway, between Angeles Forest Highway and Highway 39
    -- in the unincorporated areas and communities of Juniper Hills, Crystal Lake, East Fork of the San GabrielRiver, Camp Williams, Valyermo and Llano (except for the Longview section, which is under an evacuation warning)
    -- south and west of Upper Big Tujunga Canyon Road, east of Angeles Forest Highway and north of Angeles Crest Highway

    VIDEO: Bobcat Fire spawns 'smokenado' near Big Pine amid strong winds

    A "smokenado" was captured on camera twisting into the sky near Big Pines as the nearly 100,000-acre Bobcat Fire continued to rage.


    The following areas remained under evacuation warnings as of Tuesday afternoon, according to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department:

    -- Pasadena and Altadena: north of Sierra Madre Boulevard, west of Michillinda Avenue, east of Washington Boulevard, north of New York Drive, as well as north of New York Drive and Woodbury Drive, east of Hahamongna Watershed Park
    -- Littlerock: south of Pearblossom Highway, north of Weber Ranch Road, east of Cheseboro Road, west of 87th Street East
    -- south of Highway 2, north of Blue Ridge Truck Trail, east of Highway 39, and west of the Los Angeles County border
    -- Longview: south of Avenue U-8, north of East Avenue W-14, east of 121st East, and west of 155th Street East
    -- south of Pearblossom Highway, south and east of Pearblossom Highway, north and west of Mt. Emma Road, north and east of Angeles Forest Highway, and west of Cheseboro Road

    -- south of Mount Emma Road, north of Upper Big Tujunga Canyon Road, and west of Pacifico Mountain

    The Wrightwood area in San Bernardino County was also under an evacuation warning.

    A Red Cross evacuation center has been set up at Palmdale High School in the Antelope Valley, while the earlier evacuation point at Santa Anita Park for those in the San Gabriel Valley was closed. Anyone still needing assistance was urged to call the Disaster Distress Hotline at 800-675-5799.

    A total of 1,556 personnel have been assigned to the fire, and the cost of the firefight has reached at least $37.5 million, officials said.

    A closure order has been issued for national forests in Southern California including the Angeles National Forest.

    The Bobcat Fire erupted on Sept. 6 near the Cogswell Dam and West Fork Day Use area northeast of Mount Wilson and within the Angeles National Forest. The cause remains under investigation. Full containment of the fire is not expected until Oct. 30.

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