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Thread: Wildfire Roundup for California

  1. #51
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/20...lano-counties/

    HEALDSBURG (CBS SF/AP) — Thousands of residents forced to flee their wine country homes as the flames from the LNU Lightning Complex fires closed in on their neighborhoods continued their exodus back home Monday, hopeful to find their houses still standing and their life possessions untouched.

    The latest evacuation order downgraded to an advisory as of 4 p.m. Monday was in Yolo County along the eastern edge of the fire. The advisory applies to areas of Zone 1 and Zone 2. The current advisory for Zone 3 was lifted for all the zone’s residents (Learn More). Earlier Monday, evacuation warnings were lifted for areas of Colusa County.

    Monday, Cal Fire officials released a detailed breakdown of the devastating toll the fire complex has taken. At least 274 homes were razed in Napa County, 268 in Solano County, and 118 in Sonoma County.

    There has also been a human toll. Five people — three in Napa County, two in Solano County near Vacaville — have died while four other civilians have been injured.

    CONTINUING COVERAGE: Latest on California Wildfires

    And the battle with the flames continued Monday. The complex was only 63 percent contained and has burned 375,209 acres — the state’s third-largest wildfire outbreak in history. More than 2,800 firefighters were on the lines of the massive complex.

    “Firefighters worked to control flare-ups in the interior islands of the fire which pose a threat,” Cal Fire officials said in a Monday morning news release. “Dry weather continues with hotter than usual temperatures this week. Crews will work to mitigate additional fire growth in the North and East areas of the complex.”

    Several fires formed the complex — Hennessey has been combined with Gamble, Green, Aetna, Markley, Spanish, Morgan and Round blazes. The Walbridge was combined the Meyers. The Hennessey Fire was at 317,909 acres and 62% contained. The Walbridge Fire was at 54,940 acres and 64% contained.

    Structures have been destroyed or damaged in Lake, Solano, Yolo, Sonoma, Napa and Solano counties.

    For the billion-dollar wine industry, the fire complex has combined with the COVID-19 outbreak to present significant fiscal challenges this year.

    With an early harvest already underway, the fire complex raging a few miles west of John Bucher’s ranch near Healdsburg last week added new urgency to getting his pinot noir grapes off the vine. If flames didn’t do any damage to the delicate fruit, ash and smoke certainly could.

    Bucher hired an extra crew, and they finished the task before dawn Wednesday in the quaint wine country destination of Healdsburg, remarkably early in the year for a grape that is often not harvested until the end of September.

    “It was just a race to get it done,” Bucher said, his voice hoarse after three days of almost no sleep and working in occasionally smoky conditions.

    In three of the past four years, major wildfires have burned in Napa and Sonoma counties, charring vineyards, burning down a historic winery and sending plumes of smoke above the neatly tended rows of vines rolling across scenic hills.

    While the majority of vineyards, winemaking facilities and tasting rooms that lure tourists from around the world have escaped damage, the perception of the area being on fire yet again has not helped business. Add restrictions on tastings and dining during the coronavirus pandemic, and winemakers say they are reeling.

    “This year, you throw COVID on it, and what did we do to deserve this?” said Corey Beck, CEO and winemaking chief at Francis Ford Coppola Winery. “We really hurt more from the lack of tourists. That has been our Achilles’ heel during this time.”

    Lightning-sparked wildfires west of Sonoma County and east of Napa two weeks ago coincided with the start of the harvest for some grape varieties. That’s much earlier than devastating fires last year and in 2017 that erupted in October, when nearly all the grapes were off the vine and in the process of being converted to wine.

    The early fires pose a threat if they persist and heavy smoke blankets the region for several days before grapes are picked. That can lead to “smoke taint,” an undesirable burnt taste in wine made from grapes with skins permeated by smoke.

    While Napa and Sonoma counties produce only about 10% of the state’s wine, they have an outsized influence on California’s position as the nation’s leading wine producer. The neighboring counties have a combination of chic and rustic wineries — from chateau-style estates to those offering tastings in barns — and are the best known among California’s many wine regions. The grapes grown there have the highest value.

    Fires led to evacuation orders for some vineyards and closed down wineries that had pivoted to offering outdoor tastings and dining to meet state regulations during the pandemic.

    While fires in recent years hurt tourism as smoke cast a pall over the verdant valleys bisected by rivers and surrounded by forested hillsides, most tasting rooms remained open and tourists still came.

    But the landscape changed this year.

    “You can’t sit inside because of the pandemic, and you can’t sit outside because of the smoke,” said Janet Tupper of Napa, who runs Mercantile 12, a wholesale business that sells wine country-themed gifts, such as T-shirts, tea towels, tote bags and wine accessories, to gift shops and tasting rooms.

    While large wine producers that sell to grocery chains and others with robust online sales have thrived during widespread business closures during the pandemic, wineries that sell high-end wines to restaurants and those that rely on tourists have suffered.

    Given the large tourism losses since businesses shut down in March as COVID-19 spread, the impact of wildfires will be negligible in comparison, said James Lapsley, a researcher at the University of California’s Agricultural Issues Center and a winemaker.

    Vineyards have been largely resilient to fire because they generally don’t burn and serve as firebreaks, Lapsley said. The bigger threat now is the possibility of smoke damage.

    Some wineries that don’t have their own vineyards are opting out of buying some grapes this year because the risk is too great that a vintage could be spoiled by smoke, said Tawny Tesconi, executive director of the Sonoma County Farm Bureau.

    That creates a ripple effect in the economy that leads to fewer harvesting jobs and less wine to sell. While crop insurance provides some protection for growers, it’s never enough to recoup the loss, Tesconi said.

    Farmers, who are accustomed to coping with drought, flooding and labor shortages, now have to add wildfire to the challenges they face. When the Walbridge Fire broke out two weeks ago, part of the LNU Lightning Complex of fires around wine country, the Farm Bureau was holding a fire training program for members.

    “It’s almost like we’ve accepted that these situations are happening way too often in Sonoma County,” Tesconi said. “The devastation that wildfire can bring unexpectedly in a short period of time is more of a concern because you just have no control over it.”

    Because of frost early in the year, cold temperatures in May and then extreme heat in August that threatened to shrivel grapes on the vine, Bucher had already begun to harvest his pinot noir fruit a few days before the fire ignited.

    Bucher produces his own wine but also sells to 15 other winemakers. They were relying on his crop and became concerned as the fire burned and sometimes sent heavy smoke over his vineyards.

    With extra workers, they completed the harvest in 12 days instead of the typical three to four weeks. Preliminary results show there is very little smoke taint, but he won’t know until he can taste the wine after fermentation.

  2. #52
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    https://www.ksbw.com/article/czu-lig...ained/33863837

    SANTA CRUZ, Calif. —
    Containment on the CZU Lightning Complex increased to 43% as of Tuesday morning.

    A total of more than 1,100 structures have burned in Santa Cruz County since the fire began Aug. 16. Of those structures, 921 are single-family residences.


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    Fire officials said 85,218 acres have burned so far and another 6,700 structures remain threatened by the flames in Santa Cruz and San Mateo counties.

    Cal Fire announced there were no planned press conferences, either at 6 a.m. or 6 p.m., until further notice.

    One person remains missing, and detectives are working on locating that person.

    Some residents of Ben Lomond, Felton and Zayante were allowed to return to their homes Sunday, and the Santa Cruz Sheriff’s Office said they were continuing to reevaluate the fire zones to make sure they’re safe before allowing more people back in.

    Fire officials were counting on better weather so they could fly water-dropping planes over the hard-to-reach areas of the fire where firefighters can't reach.

    As of Sunday, 2,100 firefighting personnel were on the fire line.

    RELATED | Santa Cruz County to open fire recovery center
    RELATED | Interactive map of evacuation zones.
    ---------------------------------------

    The fires from the CZU Lightning Complex started Aug. 16 from lightning strikes.

    Santa Cruz County has released an interactive map which shows saved, damaged and destroyed homes from the CZU Lightning Complex. (Link)

    Evacuations Orders in Santa Cruz County
    Waterman Gap Loop, Upper HWY 236, Boulder Creek Golf Course, Heartwood Hill, Lodge Road, Community of Little Basin, Lower China Grade, Upper China Grade, Community of Kings Hwy, Lower Jamison Creek, Gallion Heights, Fallen Leaf Neighborhood, Foxglove Lane (Zones CRZ10, CRZ13, BOU36, BOU20, BOU30, BOU31, BOU36, BOU37, BOU21) (8/18/2020 10 pm)
    Saratoga Toll Road, San Lorenzo Park, Riverside Grove-Community of Teilh Drive, Wildwood Road (BOU38, BOU39, BOU40, BOU41, BOU42, BOU43) (8/18/2020 10 pm)
    Everyone on Empire Grade Road, from Felton Empire north, all of Pine Flat Road, all of Ice Cream Grade, Bonny Doon Road, in between Pine Flat Road, Martin Road, and all associated side streets are under an evacuation order. Areas west of State Route 35 from San Mateo County Line to State Route 17. (CRZ1, CRZ2, CRZ3, CRZ4, CRZ5, CRZ10, CRZ11, CRZ12, CRZ13, CRZ14B) (8/19/2020 1:00 am)
    Bonny Doon south of Ice Cream Grade, to include Pine Flat Road South. (CRZ7, CRZ8) (8/19/2020 1:00 am)
    Areas of Alba Road, Hubbard Gulch and Fanning Grade. (BEN 1) (8/19/2020 6:00 pm)
    • All areas adjacent to the Bonny Doon and San Lorenzo Valley should be prepared to evacuate if necessary. (CRZ7, CRZ8) (8/20/2020 1:00 am)
    • Areas West of Highway 9 to Empire Grade
    • Butano State Park area including Barrranca Knolls Community(Zone: SMC E019) (8/18/2020 4:30 pm)
    Evacuation warnings
    Evacuation warnings have been placed for the following areas:

    Currently no warnings.
    Evacuation Resources
    Evacuees can still pick up their mail at set up Post Offices in Santa Cruz County.

    Evacuation centers have been set up at the following locations:

    Santa Cruz County Fairground, 2601 E. Lake Avenue in Watsonville.
    Santa Cruz Civic Auditorium, 307 Church St., Santa Cruz
    Santa Cruz Seventh Day Adventist Camp Grounds, 1931 Soquel San Jose Rd
    Santa Cruz Bible Church, 440 Frederick St., Santa Cruz. Room for 76 evacuees as well as parking.
    Congregational Church of Soquel, 4951 Soquel Dr., Soquel. Bathrooms available for evacuees.
    Twin Lakes Church (parking only), 2701 Cabrillo College Dr., Aptos. Up to 50 cars and RV’s, bathrooms, water and food available.
    Cabrillo College Lot K (parking only), 6500 Soquel Dr., Apto
    Parking lot and grounds of Coastlands Aptos Foursquare Church, 280 State Park Dr., Aptos. Open to cars, RV’s and tents. (Limited tents available on site).
    Gymnasium of Cabrillo College, 6500 Soquel Dr., Aptos. Congregate shelter.
    ADA-compliant: Simpkins Family Swim Center, 979 17th Ave., Santa Cruz. Room for 25 evacuees.
    Harbor High School, 300 La Fonda Ave., Santa Cruz. Room for 75 evacuees.
    Availability can be checked in real-time at https://www.co.santa-cruz.ca.us/FireShelters.aspx

    For help with animal evacuations, contact the Santa Cruz Animal Shelter at 831-471-1182. Evacuation site for the county and livestock is Watsonville County Fairgrounds. Call to confirm space if needed.

    If you are in need of transportation to an evacuation center or other safe destination, contact Lift Line at 831-688-9663
    For those needing help to find accommodations due to the fires, contact the Red Cross at 866-272-2237 or call 211
    CAL Fire's Public Information Office is available to provide updates by calling 831-335-6717
    Click here to view the county's fire and evacuation map
    Shelters are open to county residents. Pets are welcome under the owner's control.
    For animal evacuation assistance: Call 831-471-1182
    Human Services benefits hotline: Call 1-888-421-8080
    List yourself as "safe and well" at the Red Cross' website: redcross.org/safeandwell

  3. #53
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    Idaho rescue crews coming to California for Wildfire relief response.

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    https://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2020...mpany-dropped/

    VACAVILLE (CBS13) — No home, no job, and no way to rebuild, a Vacaville couple is left scrambling to figure out how to move forward after their home was destroyed by the LNU Lightning Complex Fire.

    “Within a minute or two, there was a pounding on the door from the authorities. They said, “Gotta get out, gotta get out,” said Curt Hatton.

    Hatton and his wife Aree took one last look at their home and the sign above their front door which read, “no bad days.” They fled the fire, which in minutes, took over Gibson Canyon.

    “Two days later, just rolling embers,” said Curt Hatton.

    The place they called home for 20 years was now just ash and debris.

    “I don’t know how to explain it, it’s deep in my heart,” said Aree Hatton.

    READ: Protest Held After Vacaville Prisons Aren’ Evacuated During LNU Complex Fires

    The only bright spot is that some of Aree’s art is still standing, but the good news for this Vacaville couple ends there.

    “I diligently called the insurance company to file a claim, and I was shocked to learn they didn’t have a home policy on me,” said Curt Hatton.

    The Hattons are among thousands of homeowners losing their insurance coverage over fire risk. Some insurers are pulling out of California even in non-fire zones.

    Curt says his insurance company just supplied him with a letter of non-renewal that says it was mailed to him in April, but he says he never got it.

    “I received no such letter,” he said.

    The letter says his policy expired just one month before and gave them reasons for why they were being dropped.

    ALSO: ‘Still Kind Of Numb’: Vacaville Home With Classic Cars, Antique Collections Burned To Ground

    “They had, as a lot of insurance companies do in California, classified you in a high fire, high-risk area,” Curt Hatton said.

    So what is required from insurance companies when they decide to drop a policyholder? The State Department of Insurance says insurance companies need to have valid renewal guidelines in place. They need to provide 75 days of advanced notice and give a reason for the non-renewal.

    If the policyholder has a mortgage, then the insurance company has to send the notice to the lender. Also, leaders with the State Department say homeowners like the Hattons need more support.

    “Insurance companies need to play a bigger role to help people protect their homes and bring down that risk,” said Hatton.

    For the Hattons, they’re not sure what’s next, they say rebuilding will likely be too expensive. They plan to work with the State Insurance Department to see if they were dropped legally. They’ll be looking to see if that insurance policy was actually sent to them 75 days before they were dropped.

  5. #55
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    https://abc7news.com/wildfires-bay-a...ality/6404330/

    Sep. 3, 2020


    5 p.m.
    Evacuation orders downgraded in San Mateo Co.
    Evacuation orders have been downgraded to warnings in the following areas: Areas in San Mateo County, Areas of north Canyon Road, Community of Loma Mar and Deerborn Park.

    2:45 p.m.
    Lake Berryessa to remain closed Labor Day weekend due to fire damage
    The Bureau of Reclamation says facilities at Lake Berryessa will remain closed through Labor Day weekend due to fire damage. Officials say this includes all day-use areas, boat launching and concession-operated sites. The area sustained extensive damage from the recent lightning-ignited fires and will not reopen until it is safe. Officials say all reservations at Markley Cove, Pleasure Cove, Steele Canyon, Spanish Flat, and Putah Canyon Resorts have been canceled.

    6:40 a.m.
    Firefighters race for containment before temps surge
    Firefighters across the Bay Area are racing for containment before temperatures surge this weekend. The SCU Lightning Complex in Santa Clara, Alameda, and Contra Costa counties is now 76-percent contained and has burned more than 390,000 acres. The LNU Lightning Complex in Napa, Sonoma, Lake, and Solano counties has burned more than 375,000 acres and is 78-percent contained. The CZU Complex in Santa Cruz and San Mateo Counties has burned more than 85,000 acres and is almost 50-percent contained.

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    https://fox5sandiego.com/news/califo...to-high-temps/


    FOLSOM, Calif. (KRON) ? A statewide Flex Alert will be in effect between the hours of 3 p.m. and 9 p.m. starting Saturday and running until Monday, officials said.

    The California Independent System Operator issued the alert Thursday due to unusually high heat expected this holiday weekend.

    ?The power grid operator is predicting an increase in electricity demand, primarily from air conditioning use. Overnight temperatures statewide are projected to be at least 10 degrees higher than normal, which doesn?t allow infrastructure to cool down,? The California ISO said in a press release.

    The ISO advises Californians to conserve electricity in the afternoons and evening. Here?s what it suggests to do:

    Set air conditioning thermostats to 78 degrees, if health permits.
    Defer use of major appliances.
    Turn off unnecessary lights.
    Unplug unused electrical devices.
    Close blinds and drapes.
    Use fans when possible.
    Limit time the refrigerator door is open.
    Here?s what you can do before 3 p.m. each day the Flex Alert is in effect:

    ?Pre-cool? their homes, or lower air conditioning thermostats.
    Charge electric vehicles.
    Charge mobile devices and laptops.
    Run dishwashers, washing machines and other major appliances.
    Set pool pumps to run in the early morning or late at night.

    https://fox5sandiego.com/weather/loc...end-heat-wave/

    SAN DIEGO ? Local fire agencies are warning that a weekend heat wave is expected to bring record-breaking temperatures to some parts of San Diego County and increase the fire danger all around the region.

    ?Folks have got to be extra vigilant this weekend and throughout the summer. We?re in fire season. It doesn?t take much to get a massive wildfire going,? said Cal Fire Capt. Kendal Bortisser. ?Dry enough ? that?s when we start getting concerned ? humidity dropping, temperatures rising. That?s a real game-changer for us.?

    Most of the vegetation that grew during the wet season is now very dry. It
    creates plenty of fuel for brush fires.

    So far this summer, San Diego has been spared from the catastrophic fires that continue to burn in Northern California. But firefighters have made progress against those fires, and Bortisser said that is also good news for San Diego County.

    ?We have had a number of our resources come back from Northern California,? he said. ?We?re able to put more folks on-duty, staff up extra equipment and make sure we have everything in place we need in the event something should happen this weekend.?

    Having defensible space around buildings is crucial during fire season, Bortisser said, but if you

    ?This weekend is probably not one of those weekends we want you out with your weed-eater and chainsaw trying to clear your brush and maintain a fire-safe condition,? Bortisser said. ?Certainly, we want you to do the right thing, but we want you to do it at the right time.?

  7. #57
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    https://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2020...xcessive-heat/

    YUCAIPA (CBSLA) — A brush fire developed Saturday in Yucaipa, quickly growing to 2,159 acres and sending a large plume of smoke into the sky. As of approximately 10:20 p.m., the fire was 5% contained.

    Dubbed the El Dorado fire, the blaze erupted around 10:30 a.m. at El Dorado Ranch Park and prompted the evacuation of the following areas:

    Oak Glen (partial, see road closures)
    Mountain Home Village
    Forest Falls
    A portion of North Bench Yucaipa (east of Jefferson St., North of Oak Glen Rd., south of Yucaipa Ridge and west of the community of Oak Glen)
    The following road closures are in place:

    Highway 38 at Bryant St. in Yucaipa and the community of Angelus Oaks
    Oak Glen Rd. between Pine Bench Rd. and Cherry Croft Dr.
    There is a soft closure on Highway 38 at Lake Williams Dr. to warn drivers of the closure in Angelus Oaks
    A temporary evacuation center is located at the Yucaipa Community Center, 34900 Oak Glen Rd, Yucaipa, CA 92399.

    The fire erupted around 10:30 a.m. on Saturday and had a dangerous rate of spread, aggravated by windy and extremely hot conditions, according to firefighters.

    Cal Fire San Bernardino Unit is in unified command with San Bernardino County Fire, San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department, California Highway Patrol, City of Yucaipa, and San Bernardino National Forest.

    “We have the trifecta of everything,” said CAL Fire PIO Thomas Shoots. “We have the winds picking up, we have the super-hot temperatures, we have the dry air. On top that, look at the terrain we’re dealing with out here, a lot of rugged terrains, a lot of difficult to access areas. And so it all kinds of comes together, and unfortunately, a lot of the stuff we saw with the Apple Fire, we’ve seen today.”

    No injuries have been reported and the cause of the fire has not yet been determined.

    CBSLA STAFF






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    https://ktla.com/news/california/200...tional-forest/

    More than 200 people were airlifted to safety early Sunday after a fast-moving wildfire trapped them in a popular camping area in California?s Sierra National Forest, one several fires that broke out amid record-breaking, triple-digit temperatures that baked the state.

    The California Office of Emergency Services said Black Hawk and Chinook helicopters were used for the rescues that began late Saturday and continued overnight. At least two people were severely injured and 10 more suffered moderate injuries.

    The wildfire, named the Creek Fire, started Friday and by Saturday afternoon exploded to 56 square miles (145 square kilometers), jumped the San Joaquin River and cut off the only road into the Mammoth Pool Campground, national forest spokesman Dan Tune said. At least 2,000 structures were threatened in the area about 290 miles (467 kilometers) north of Los Angeles, where temperatures in the city?s San Fernando Valley reached 117 degrees (47 Celsius).

    Tune said the campers were told to shelter in place until fire crews, aided by water-dropping aircraft, could gain access to the site.

    The lake 35 miles (56 kilometers) northeast of Fresno is surrounded by thick pine forests and is a popular destination for boating and fishing. Bone-dry conditions and the hot weather fueled the flames.

    ?Once the fire gets going, it creates its own weather, adding wind to increase the spread,? Tune said.

    Ashley Wagner was among those rescued, along with two relatives and a friend. They were trapped in Logan?s Meadow behind Wagner?s Store, a 63-year-old business run by her aunt that was destroyed.

    ?My family?s history just went up in flames,? she told Fresno station ABC30.

    In Southern California, a fire in the foothills of Yucaipa east of Los Angeles prompted evacuation orders for eastern portions of the city of 54,000 along with several mountain communities. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, known as Cal Fire, said the fire scorched at least 4.2 square miles (11 square kilometers) of brush and trees.

    Bob Fonzi nervously watched the fire race across ridges near his remote home on a winding road.

    ?If that sweeps around, it comes into my back door,? he told KABC-TV on Saturday. ?And the problem with that is there?s no easy access for fire personnel.?

    The blaze was just 5% contained Sunday morning.

    In eastern San Diego County, the Valley Fire broke out Saturday afternoon and fire officials warned the blaze was burning at a ?dangerous rate of speed.? By Sunday morning it had destroyed at least 10 structures after burning 6.25 square miles (16 square kilometers) and prompting evacuations near the remote community of Alpine in the Cleveland National Forest. There was no containment.

    Cal Fire said nearly 12,500 firefighters were battling 22 major fires in the state. Despite the heat, firefighters were able to contain two major fires in coastal Monterey County.

    California has seen 900 wildfires since Aug. 15, many of them started by an intense series of thousands of lightning strikes. The blazes have burned more than 1.5 million acres (2,343 square miles). There have been eight fire deaths and nearly 3,300 structures destroyed.

    The heat wave was expected to spread triple-digit temperatures over much of California through Monday. Officials urged people to conserve electricity to ease the strain on the state?s power grid.

    Pacific Gas & Electric, the state?s largest utility, warned customers Saturday that it might cut power starting Tuesday because of expected high winds and heat that could create even greater fire danger. Some of the state?s largest and deadliest fires in recent years have been sparked by downed power lines and other utility equipment.

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    https://fox5sandiego.com/news/local-...l-valley-area/

    AST COUNTY — Firefighters will work through the night fighting the Valley Fire after it damaged homes and spurred evacuations Saturday.

    The fire quickly grew from 20 to 1,500 acres after it broke out in Japatul Valley south of Alpine around 3 p.m.

    Photo gallery: Valley Fire quickly grows to 1,500 acres
    It was zero percent contained and moving southwest toward the community of Lawson Valley late Saturday night. Cal Fire said homes were damaged but the agency couldn’t say how many.

    “We do have confirmation that there have been homes, structures destroyed and damaged but I don’t have a number for you yet, this is still an escalating incident,” Capt. Kendal Bortisser with Cal Fire told FOX 5.

    He said the fire surpassed 1,500 acres Saturday night. As soon as planes go up in the morning, they’ll have a better idea of how large it has grown. Hundreds of firefighters will work through the night including more who are en route, Bortisser said.

    Evacuations and closures
    San Diego County Sheriff’s Department officers were helping with evacuations in Carve Acre, a sparsely populated area of East County south of Japatul Road and west of Lyons Valley Road.

    Officers told evacuees to go to Steele Canyon High School at 12440 Campo Road in Spring Valley or Joan MacQueen Middle School at 2001 Tavern Road in Alpine.

    Officials are urging people who live in the area to register their cellphones for San Diego County evacuation alerts. Click here to do so.

    The sheriff’s department is also warning of several road closures:

    Japatul Rd & Carveacre Rd

    Lawson Valley Rd & Skyline Truck Trail

    Japatul Rd & Sequan Truck Trail (soft closure)

    Japatul Rd & Hidden Glen Rd

    San Diego Fire Department said they had three engine companies and a battalion chief assisting with the Valley Fire. They will likely dispatch Copter 3 for night drops, the department said.

    SDG&E originally said up to 12,700 customers were without power because the Valley Fire was impacting SDG&E equipment. They later said only 1,000 customers were without power because of the wildfire.

    The Red Cross and humane society are dispatching emergency response teams to help evacuees. SkyMaverick, SDG&E’s water-dropping helicopter, has been dispatched to help fight the flames.
    https://fox5sandiego.com/news/local-...m-valley-fire/

    SAN DIEGO — Officials warned residents about air quality issues Sunday as smoke and ash from the Valley Fire drifted across the county and conditions were compounded by an oppressive heat wave.

    While San Diego’s Air Pollution Control District said most residents in areas where the smoke is not heavy should not face serious health concerns, they told people who can smell smoke when they step outside to limit outdoor activity.

    Click here for updates on the Valley Fire as the battle continues Sunday.

    People in areas closest to the fire — which is burning in rural communities near Alpine in East County — are seeing heavier amounts of smoke and ash, and they should stay indoors, close their windows and limit time outside, officials said.

    “In areas of heavy smoke, assume that air quality levels (range from) unhealthy for sensitive groups to unhealthy for all individuals,” the Pollution Control District said on their website. “In areas with minor smoke impacts, assume that air quality levels range from moderate to unhealthy for sensitive groups.

    Photos: Impact of destructive Valley Fire seen around county
    “In areas where you smell smoke it is advised that you limit physical/outdoor activity. If possible, stay indoors to limit your exposure to fine particulate matter and ozone, especially those residents with respiratory or heart disease, the elderly, and children.”

    Read more on the agency’s website.

    Plumes of smoke from the blaze could be seen for miles around the county Saturday and Sunday as firefighters dealt with extreme heat while trying to control the flames. As of Sunday morning, the Valley Fire had scorched at least 4,000 acres, according to Cal Fire.


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    https://www.kron4.com/news/bay-area-...ugh-labor-day/

    SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. (KRON) – A record-breaking string of Spare the Air alerts is now in its third week, with an alert for the region extended through Labor Day mostly due to smog, district officials said Saturday.

    The alert, which ban the burning of wood or other solid fuel both indoors and outdoors, are the 20th and 21st consecutive alerts issued by the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.

    Officials say the ban of burning wood is only in effect for Saturday.

    In recent days the alerts were prompted by wildfire smoke — which continues to be a factor — but unhealthy levels of smog, or ozone are expected to accumulate through Monday, air district officials said.

    “Though wildfire smoke has subsided significantly and air quality has improved over the past few days, high temperatures and tailpipe exhaust are expected to cause unhealthy smog this holiday weekend,” said Jack Broadbent, executive officer of the Air District.


    Smoke from the Woodward Fire in Marin County may also produce pockets of unhealthy air quality in southern Marin County, San Francisco, portions of the East Bay and potentially Vallejo, district officials said.

    Triple-digit temperatures are forecast around the region through Labor Day.

    Bay Area residents should reduce driving and avoid smoke exposure when the smell of smoke is present, Broadbent said. Residents in locations with unhealthy air are advised to stay inside with windows and doors closed and to set air conditioning units to re-circulate to prevent outside air from coming inside.

    Ozone, or smog, can cause throat irritation, congestion, chest pain, trigger asthma, inflame the lining of the lungs and worsen bronchitis and emphysema.

    Long-term exposure to ozone can reduce lung function. Ozone pollution is particularly harmful for young children, seniors and those with respiratory and heart conditions. When a Spare the Air Alert is issued, outdoor exercise should be done only in the early morning hours when ozone concentrations are lower.

    Copyright ? 2020 by Bay City News, Inc.

  13. #63
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    https://ktla.com/news/california/cal...-extreme-heat/

    Though Californians on Saturday avoided rolling blackouts, Sunday’s extreme heat threatens to bring record-breaking demand for energy that could strain the state’s power grids.

    Grid operators report rotating power outages are “likely” Sunday, according to the California Independent System Operator, which runs the electrical grid for most of the state.

    As California swelters under triple-digit temperatures and officials grapple with fire-caused power grid system failures, the state is working to free up energy capacity during the Labor Day weekend, according to Gov. Gavin Newsom’s office.

    To reduce demand, the state is asking large commercial and public energy consumers to shift their energy usage away from peak hours. Officials are also partnering with third-party energy producers to bring back-up energy generation resources and asking the U.S. Navy and commercial ports to use on-ship electrical generation instead of pulling resources from the grid.

    On Thursday, the governor declared a state of emergency, suspending regulations to create more energy and reduce demand on the grid in order to stave off potential blackouts.

    Residents are under a statewide Flex Alert, with electrical grid operators urging residents to reduce their power consumption from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m. each day through Monday. Recommendations include setting thermostats to 78 degrees or higher and not using appliances during the peak hours.

    RELATED CONTENT
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    L.A. County power outages affect more than 20,000; California’s grid operator warns of possible rotating blackouts
    Officials urge caution at the beach, saving power at home as SoCal experiences hot Labor Day weekend
    SoCal to see even hotter weather after Saturday’s record-breaking heat
    Outages were avoided Friday and Saturday largely because of individual conservation efforts, Newsom’s office said.

    “Even with these efforts, given the extreme heat storm, Californians may experience rolling energy blackouts this afternoon if users do not conserve enough energy to lower the demand on California’s power grid,” Newsom’s office said in a news release.

    Making the situation even worse, the Creek Fire in Madera County has forced the closure of a 915 megawatt hydropower station.

    The California ISO declared a Stage 2 Emergency by 6:30 p.m. Saturday — but Sunday is expected to bring even hotter weather.

    “Wildfires have caused system failures, while near record energy demand is predicted as a multi-state heat wave hits the West Coast for the second time in a matter of weeks,” Newsom said in a statement. “Californians are rising to the occasion to meet these unprecedented challenges for our energy grid, and I want to thank all of the businesses and individuals who are conserving energy.”

    After last month’s heatwave caused power disruptions, the governor sent a letter to the California Independent System Operator, the California Public Utilities Commission and California Energy Commission, calling for an investigation into the blackouts.

    Here are some tips for conserving power:
    Don’t use major appliance use between 3 p.m. and 10 p.m.
    Turn off unnecessary lights and appliances.
    Pre-cool your home by running air conditioning at 72 degrees in the morning then turn it up to 78 or higher during the hottest part of the day.
    Keep windows and doors closed.
    Unplug phone chargers, power strips without a switch and other equipment when not in use.
    Turn your water heater down to 120 degrees.
    Postpone using major appliances like the oven, dishwasher, clothes washer and dryer until cooler times of the day to avoid heating up your home.
    Run your dishwasher and washing machine only when they’re full, and do it after 10 p.m.
    Make sure your air conditioner filter is clean — a dirty filter forces the unit to use more energy and could increase costs.

  14. #64
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    https://www.kcra.com/article/smoky-s...ounty/33933471


    SACRAMENTO, Calif. —
    A wildfire burning in Fresno County is causing smoky and hazy air all over Northern California on Saturday, including Sacramento.

    The Creek Fire sparked on Friday around 6:45 p.m. near Shaver Lake, according to the U.S. Forest Service.


    The blaze has charred around 36,000 acres and resulted in several evacuations and road closures in Fresno County.

    Residents in Northern California will feel the impact from the smoke of the Creek Fire throughout the Labor Day holiday weekend, and possibly into the next week.

    Triple-digit temperatures are forecast throughout the weekend, but the high heat may be tempered due to the smoke.


  15. #65
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    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/smo...tional-forest/

    A rapidly spreading fire in the Angeles National Forest near the Azusa area is threatening structures on Sunday, officials said.

    The Bobcat Fire erupted around 12:20 p.m. and has scorched about 1,800 acres of heavy fuels, according to forest officials. Video from the scene shows smoke rising from the Azusa area.

    “Firefighters are experiencing erratic fire behavior,” officials said.

    The fast-moving fire had exploded to about 500 acres by 2:40 p.m., doubled in size in just two hours and then grew another 800 acres by 6 p.m. It was 0% contained.

    “No threat to Azusa residents,” city officials said in announcing the closure of Azusa Canyon. “Avoid canyon at this time only emergency vehicles and residents will be allowed up the canyon.”

    The blaze erupted as Southern California experienced record-breaking, triple-digit heat on Labor Day weekend.

    The Bobcat Fire area was scorching under a temperature of 103, fanned by winds gusting at 14 mph at the higher elevations, according to the National Weather Service.

    In San Bernardino County, the El Dorado Fire has burned more than 3,000 acres and forced the evacuation of residents in the Yucaipa area.


  16. #66
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    https://ktla.com/news/california/cal...oss-the-state/

    California Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency in five counties late Sunday as multiple wildfires continue to burn across the state following a weekend that brought both record high heat and record acres scorched.

    The state of emergency applies to Fresno, Madera and Mariposa counties where the Creek Fire is burning and San Bernardino and San Diego counties where the El Dorado Fire and Valley Fire, respectively, are raging, a statement from the state’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) said Sunday night.

    Tens of thousands of acres have been burned by the three fires, which have also destroyed homes and caused thousands of residents to evacuate, according to the Cal OES statement.

    Hundreds rescued after fire traps campers
    Dangerous flames fueled by high temperatures and dry conditions resulted in a massive airlift operation that rescued dozens of people on Saturday night. They had been celebrating the holiday weekend in Mammoth Pool Reservoir when a wall of flames from the Creek Fire closed roads in Maderas County, trapping them.

    More than 200 people were airlifted from the campsite by a Chinook and Blackhawk Helicopter, Cpl. David Hall of the California National Guard said during a news conference Sunday.

    The rescue operation began late Saturday and was completed around 1:30 a.m. on Sunday, he said. Rescue crews decided to load as many people on board as possible on the second run to the campsite as weather conditions deteriorated.

    “On that second round — when it was more important to get everybody out — it was important that they brought everybody on, secured what they could and then everybody else ended up taking a seat on the floor,” he said. “We do not like to operate this way but because of the circumstances of this being an urgent situation threatening life, the pilots and command made a smart decision by asking them to get on the helicopter and loading as many as they could on that lift.”

    Hall said that two people were seriously injured and 19 evacuees suffered lesser injuries.

    The fires have burned thousands of acres
    RELATED CONTENT
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    The Creek Fire in the Sierra Nevada Mountains has burned 45,500 acres and remains at 0% containment as of early Monday morning, according to the Cal Fire website. The fire started on Friday night, northeast of Shaver Lake and the cause is still under investigation.

    The Valley Fire in San Diego County, southeast of Alpine, has burned 9,850 acres since it began Saturday and is at 1% containment, Cal Fire San Diego said in a tweet late Sunday night. Eleven structures have been destroyed in the fire and evacuations have been ordered in the area.

    In San Bernardino County, the El Dorado Fire — which started during a gender reveal using a pyrotechnic device — has scorched 7,050 acres and is at 5% containment.

    There are also several lightning complex fires throughout the state, accounting for more than 850,000 scorched acres between the SCU, CZU and LNU lightning complex fires.

    Records broken throughout the state
    This wildfire year is the worst in California’s history in terms of acres burned. The state broke its record for land scorched statewide Sunday, with 2,094,955 acres burned, Cal Fire Capt.Richard Cordova told CNN.

    “This is crazy. We haven’t even got into the October and November fire season and we’ve broken the all-time record,” Cordova said.

    “It concerns us because we need to get these firefighters off these lines and get them breaks from battling these wildfires,” he added.

    A national fire potential outlook for the months of September and October issued by the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) last week predicted a dramatic increase in fire activity across the West based on weather patterns. The report said several multi-day heat and lightning events coupled with wind primed and ignited fuels that had become critically dry in California.

    At least 10 heat records were slashed this weekend, according to an alert from the National Weather Service.

    It was the hottest it’s been in more than half a century, with seven other records set in the 1950s beaten Sunday in various parts of the state, the alert said.

    Los Angeles County, where at least two fires are still burning, saw temperatures reach a record breaking 121 degrees Sunday in Woodland Hills. National Weather Service Los Angeles also reported a high of 117 degrees in Paso Robles, making it the highest ever recorded in San Luis Obispo County.

  17. #67
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    https://www.yourcentralvalley.com/ne...r-shaver-lake/

    SHAVER LAKE, Calif. (KSEE/KGPE) — A large group of people had to be evacuated from the Mammoth Pool area over the weekend as the massive Creek Fire grows to 78,790 acres and 0% contained, according to the Madera County Sheriff’s Department.

    As people escape the flames, traffic was backed up on southbound Highway 41 from Road 200 to Highway 145, according to the California Highway Patrol. Travelers should expect delays.

    A total of 207 people were airlifted from the Mammoth Pool area to Fresno with the help of the California National Guard and assessed for medical needs, said Forest Service spokesman Daniel Tune. The fire had crossed the San Joaquin River and made a run into the area.

    Fresno County Creek Fire Emergency Information Page
    The only exit route out of the area was blocked by flames, some evacuees had to shelter in place near Wagner’s Store and Campground.

    The Madera County Sheriff’s Office said 20 of the evacuees were taken to area hospitals for treatment.

    The rest of the evacuees who did not need medical treatment were taken to a Red Cross shelter set up at the Fresno Convention Center with assistance from Fresno County and Fresno Fire, said spokeswoman Nicole Maul. They were given breakfast Sunday morning with the help of the Central California Food Bank.

    Army Lt. Gen. Daniel Hokanson, the Chief of the National Guard, tweeted a photo showing evacuees in a helicopter as they fled the Mammoth Pool area. He called the rescue effort by the California Air National Guard, “simply extraordinary.”

    Evacuees, patients arrived at Fresno Yosemite Airport from Creek Fire
    Fire crews expect to be challenged today by steep, rugged terrain, thick fuels and high temperatures Tune said. A total of 800 personnel consisting of 25 engines, five hand crews, three dozers, two helicopters and three air tankers have responded to the blaze.

    Members of the Air Force’s 146th Airlift Wing, 152nd Airlift Wing and the 302nd Airlift Wing, made 28 retardant drops on Saturday using C-130s in support of rescue operations at Mammoth Pool, according to a tweet from the 1st Air Force.

    Local crews from Fresno Fire Department and law enforcement personnel from Clovis Police have also responded to requests for assistance.

    The Creek Fire was discovered Friday night around 6:30 p.m., near Camp Sierra Road and Reddin Road in the Big Creek area, and has threatened 3,000 structures.

    Southern California Edison’s Big Creek Facility has been evacuated, while the utility’s transmission lines are being threatened by the fire. Over 2,000 customers remain without power in the Shaver Lake area.

    Edison crews are evaluating damage to its infrastructure, according to spokesman Reggie Kumar.

    Due to the Creek Fire, Yosemite National Park has issued a fire advisory for areas south of Chinquapin, including Wawona, as the blaze creeps toward the park. The advisory is a notice of danger in the future and is not an evacuation order.

    The park advises that visitors should be prepared in case an evacuation order is given.

    The Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias in the south end of Yosemite will close at 7 p.m.

  18. #68
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    https://www.yourcentralvalley.com/ne...r-shaver-lake/

    SHAVER LAKE, Calif. (KSEE/KGPE) ? A large group of people had to be evacuated from the Mammoth Pool area over the weekend as the massive Creek Fire grows to 78,790 acres and 0% contained, according to the Madera County Sheriff?s Department.

    As people escape the flames, traffic was backed up on southbound Highway 41 from Road 200 to Highway 145, according to the California Highway Patrol. Travelers should expect delays.

    A total of 207 people were airlifted from the Mammoth Pool area to Fresno with the help of the California National Guard and assessed for medical needs, said Forest Service spokesman Daniel Tune. The fire had crossed the San Joaquin River and made a run into the area.

    Fresno County Creek Fire Emergency Information Page
    The only exit route out of the area was blocked by flames, some evacuees had to shelter in place near Wagner?s Store and Campground.

    The Madera County Sheriff?s Office said 20 of the evacuees were taken to area hospitals for treatment.

    The rest of the evacuees who did not need medical treatment were taken to a Red Cross shelter set up at the Fresno Convention Center with assistance from Fresno County and Fresno Fire, said spokeswoman Nicole Maul. They were given breakfast Sunday morning with the help of the Central California Food Bank.

    Army Lt. Gen. Daniel Hokanson, the Chief of the National Guard, tweeted a photo showing evacuees in a helicopter as they fled the Mammoth Pool area. He called the rescue effort by the California Air National Guard, ?simply extraordinary.?

    Evacuees, patients arrived at Fresno Yosemite Airport from Creek Fire
    Fire crews expect to be challenged today by steep, rugged terrain, thick fuels and high temperatures Tune said. A total of 800 personnel consisting of 25 engines, five hand crews, three dozers, two helicopters and three air tankers have responded to the blaze.

    Members of the Air Force?s 146th Airlift Wing, 152nd Airlift Wing and the 302nd Airlift Wing, made 28 retardant drops on Saturday using C-130s in support of rescue operations at Mammoth Pool, according to a tweet from the 1st Air Force.

    Local crews from Fresno Fire Department and law enforcement personnel from Clovis Police have also responded to requests for assistance.

    The Creek Fire was discovered Friday night around 6:30 p.m., near Camp Sierra Road and Reddin Road in the Big Creek area, and has threatened 3,000 structures.

    Southern California Edison?s Big Creek Facility has been evacuated, while the utility?s transmission lines are being threatened by the fire. Over 2,000 customers remain without power in the Shaver Lake area.

    Edison crews are evaluating damage to its infrastructure, according to spokesman Reggie Kumar.

    Due to the Creek Fire, Yosemite National Park has issued a fire advisory for areas south of Chinquapin, including Wawona, as the blaze creeps toward the park. The advisory is a notice of danger in the future and is not an evacuation order.

    The park advises that visitors should be prepared in case an evacuation order is given.

    The Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias in the south end of Yosemite will close at 7 p.m.

  19. #69
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    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/cre...uation-orders/

    The wildfire that has burned more than 7,000 acres in Yucaipa and surrounding areas was caused by an explosive used during a gender reveal party, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

    The state agency said the fire started at El Dorado Ranch Park in Yucaipa on Saturday morning, when a smoke-generating pyrotechnic device at the party sparked the flames. The wildfire broke out at 10:23 a.m., spreading to areas further north and triggering mandatory evacuations, officials said.

    Dubbed the El Dorado Fire, it more than doubled in size Sunday as firefighters grappled with challenging weather conditions of extreme heat and low humidity.

    “I’ve been watching this fire the last two days, watching it grow,” said Deborah Reynolds, who lives in Yucaipa. “I never thought it would come as far as it did, and all of a sudden, it was leaping towards my home.”

    “The fireman was knocking on the door for me to get out. I had to leave my cats; I grabbed water and my purse and I went,” Reynolds said. She waited in a parking lot and prayed for the best.

    The wildfire burned about 3,010 acres and was 5% contained by Sunday afternoon, Cal Fire officials said. At 7 p.m., San Bernardino National Forest officials estimated it was about 7,050 acres while remaining at a containment of just 5%.

    “Today’s weather is a concern as it’s predicted to be the hottest day of the heatwave,” officials with the San Bernardino National Forest said Sunday morning. “The vegetation is also extremely dry.”

    Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a State of Emergency in San Bernardino County due to the wildfire and secured federal assistance to fight fires burning in other parts of the state.

    Residents can sign up for emergency alerts on the San Bernardino County website. The Red Cross has set up a reception site at the Yucaipa Community Center.

    The wildfire pushed south across the northeast edge of Yucaipa, which led to some changes in evacuation orders through Sunday afternoon, according to fire officials.


    The following communities remain under evacuation orders:

    Oak Glen (partial, see road closures)
    Highway 38 area of Mountain Home Village and Forest Falls
    North Bench Yucaipa (north of Yucaipa Boulevard, east of Bryant and south of Highway 38)
    North of Carter Street, west of Bryant Street and south of Highway 38

    Road closures include:

    Highway 38 at Bryant Street in Yucaipa and the community of Angelus Oaks
    Oak Glen Road between Pine Bench Road and Cherry Croft Drive
    Bryant Street, north of Carter Street
    Officials also shut down the following recreation areas:

    All San Gorgonio Wilderness, trails, trailheads and associated parking lots except for the Pacific Crest Trail, which remains open
    Other trails: Big Falls, Oak Glen Divide, Wilson Creek
    Picnic areas: Falls and Thurman Flats
    General areas: Yucaipa Ridge, Mill Creek drainage and off-trail areas of the San Gorgonio Wilderness south of the San Bernardino Peak Divide Trail, Santa Ana River Trail between 1S14 and Middle Control Road.
    Thomas Hunting Grounds Yellow Post Sites
    Forest roads: 1N12 (near Angelus Oaks), 1S12 (Warm Springs Road), 1S13 and 1S03
    The fire has destroyed at least one outbuilding, officials said. Authorities have not reported any injuries.

    The flames ignited as Southern California entered the Labor Day weekend in record-breaking heat, with Yucaipa reporting a 108 degree-temperature when the fire started.

    Two other fires exploded elsewhere in the state on Saturday: the Valley Fire, which has charred at least 4,000 acres in San Diego County, and the Creek Fire, which trapped campers in the Sierra National Forest.

    Forecasters predict even hotter temperatures in parts of California on Sunday before conditions cool down slightly on Monday.

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  21. #71
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    https://abc7.com/monrovia-residents-...-fire/6413718/

    AZUSA, Calif. (KABC) -- With Santa Ana winds forecast for Tuesday and a red flag warning issued through Wednesday, U.S. Forest Service fire officials have put some Monrovia residents on notice that they may be ordered to evacuate if the Bobcat Fire in the Angeles National Forest spreads south.

    The blaze has burned 4,871 acres at 0% containment as of after breaking out at 12:22 p.m. Sunday near the Cogswell Dam and West Fork Day Use area of the forest. The U.S. Forest Service estimates the fire will not be fully contained until Oct. 15.

    Evacuations


    Evacuations were already ordered for residents and Angeles National Forest visitors from Big Santa Anita Canyon, Mt. Wilson, San Gabriel Canyon, and Monrovia Canyon.

    Efforts were underway to clear vegetation around the Bobcat Fire. But on Monday night, incident commanders issued a warning directing Monrovia residents in the foothill area below the Bobcat Fire to be prepared to evacuate due to rapid fire growth with a potential threat to life and/or property.

    Monrovia city officials said the first phase of evacuations would affect all residents north of Hillcrest Bloulevard and north of Greystone Avenue. The second phase would impact all residents between Hillcrest Boulevard and Greystone Avenue south to Foothill Boulevard.




    Residents under the warning were urged to have evacuation plans in place, organize their emergency evacuation supplies and have essential evacuation personal belongings easily accessible. Vehicles should be fully fueled, facing out in their driveways and ready to take people and pets to designated evacuation sites, or to family and friends' homes outside of the fire area.

    At 7 a.m., the Monrovia Community Center will open as an information and cooling center. Information will also be provided over the phone at 626-256-8246.

    Those with large animals were urged to begin moving them to safety as accommodations are made at the Pomona Fairgrounds and Santa Anita Racetrack with limited capacity.

    Forest and road restrictions


    The USFS announced the closure of several national forests, including the Angeles National Forest, due to ongoing fire danger across the state. The closure goes into effect at 5 p.m. Monday and will be re-evaluated daily as conditions change, officials said.

    Other forests ordered to close were the San Bernardino National Forest, Cleveland National Forest, Los Padres National Forest, Inyo National Forest, Sequoia National Forest, Sierra National Forest and the Stanislaus National Forest.

    Restrictions were also imposed on national forest lands throughout the state that were not ordered to close.

    U.S. Forest Service officials said all ignition sources, such as campfires and gas stoves, will be prohibited across national forest system lands in California.

    Developed campgrounds and day-use sites in national forests throughout the state will also be closed until further notice.

    Motorists were asked to avoid Highway 39 so it could be used exclusively for emergency vehicles. The highway was later closed at Old San Gabriel Canyon Road.

    Battling the blaze


    The rugged terrain, access and triple-digit temperatures created difficult and dangerous conditions for firefighters. During a Monday afternoon press conference, officials expressed concern that winds in the coming days would change the direction of the flames, pushing them down the mountains toward foothill communities in the San Gabriel Valley.

    If that happens, authorities said the communities that would impacted first would be Monrovia and Duarte. Bradbury, Azusa, Arcadia and Sierra Madre could also potentially see either evacuation warnings or orders.

    "Directly coming into Monrovia or Duarte, no, that area has not burned in 50 to 100 years in some places, so the fuel-loading is high and there is not a natural break from the fuels from previous fires," said incident commander Steve Goldman.

    There are mandatory evacuations of residences on Angeles Crest Highway between Mount Wilson Road and Islip Saddle, officials said. All of Mount Wilson is also under mandatory evacuation orders. These areas include Redbox, Mount Wilson, Charlton Flats, Chilao campground and day use area, Buckhorn campground, Jarvi dayuse area, and Islip Saddle.

    A temporary flight restriction was in place over the fire area, and a large plume of smoke could be seen throughout many parts of L.A. County.

    Regulators issued a smoke advisory Monday, warning of unhealthy air quality in the San Gabriel Mountains, the east San Gabriel Valley and the Pomona-Walnut Valley.

    "It is difficult to tell where smoke, ash or soot from a fire will go, or how winds will affect the level of these particles in the air, so we ask everyone to remember that smoke and ash can be harmful to health, even for people who are healthy,'' said Dr. Muntu Davis, health officer for Los Angeles County. "If you can see smoke, soot, or ash, or you can smell smoke, pay attention to your immediate environment and take precautions to safeguard your health. These precautions are particularly important for children, older adults, and people with heart or lung diseases.''

    The cause of the blaze remains under investigation.

    In L.A., several smaller fires broke out, including one in the Sepulveda Basin, which was contained to six acres. The El Dorado Fire near Yucaipa erupted Saturday and has scorched nearly 10,000 acres.

    City News Service contributed to this report.

  22. #72
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    https://abc7.com/monrovia-residents-...-fire/6413718/

    AZUSA, Calif. (KABC) -- With Santa Ana winds forecast for Tuesday and a red flag warning issued through Wednesday, U.S. Forest Service fire officials have put some Monrovia residents on notice that they may be ordered to evacuate if the Bobcat Fire in the Angeles National Forest spreads south.

    The blaze has burned 4,871 acres at 0% containment as of after breaking out at 12:22 p.m. Sunday near the Cogswell Dam and West Fork Day Use area of the forest. The U.S. Forest Service estimates the fire will not be fully contained until Oct. 15.

    Evacuations


    Evacuations were already ordered for residents and Angeles National Forest visitors from Big Santa Anita Canyon, Mt. Wilson, San Gabriel Canyon, and Monrovia Canyon.

    Efforts were underway to clear vegetation around the Bobcat Fire. But on Monday night, incident commanders issued a warning directing Monrovia residents in the foothill area below the Bobcat Fire to be prepared to evacuate due to rapid fire growth with a potential threat to life and/or property.

    Monrovia city officials said the first phase of evacuations would affect all residents north of Hillcrest Bloulevard and north of Greystone Avenue. The second phase would impact all residents between Hillcrest Boulevard and Greystone Avenue south to Foothill Boulevard.




    Residents under the warning were urged to have evacuation plans in place, organize their emergency evacuation supplies and have essential evacuation personal belongings easily accessible. Vehicles should be fully fueled, facing out in their driveways and ready to take people and pets to designated evacuation sites, or to family and friends' homes outside of the fire area.

    At 7 a.m., the Monrovia Community Center will open as an information and cooling center. Information will also be provided over the phone at 626-256-8246.

    Those with large animals were urged to begin moving them to safety as accommodations are made at the Pomona Fairgrounds and Santa Anita Racetrack with limited capacity.

    Forest and road restrictions


    The USFS announced the closure of several national forests, including the Angeles National Forest, due to ongoing fire danger across the state. The closure goes into effect at 5 p.m. Monday and will be re-evaluated daily as conditions change, officials said.

    Other forests ordered to close were the San Bernardino National Forest, Cleveland National Forest, Los Padres National Forest, Inyo National Forest, Sequoia National Forest, Sierra National Forest and the Stanislaus National Forest.

    Restrictions were also imposed on national forest lands throughout the state that were not ordered to close.

    U.S. Forest Service officials said all ignition sources, such as campfires and gas stoves, will be prohibited across national forest system lands in California.

    Developed campgrounds and day-use sites in national forests throughout the state will also be closed until further notice.

    Motorists were asked to avoid Highway 39 so it could be used exclusively for emergency vehicles. The highway was later closed at Old San Gabriel Canyon Road.

    Battling the blaze


    The rugged terrain, access and triple-digit temperatures created difficult and dangerous conditions for firefighters. During a Monday afternoon press conference, officials expressed concern that winds in the coming days would change the direction of the flames, pushing them down the mountains toward foothill communities in the San Gabriel Valley.

    If that happens, authorities said the communities that would impacted first would be Monrovia and Duarte. Bradbury, Azusa, Arcadia and Sierra Madre could also potentially see either evacuation warnings or orders.

    "Directly coming into Monrovia or Duarte, no, that area has not burned in 50 to 100 years in some places, so the fuel-loading is high and there is not a natural break from the fuels from previous fires," said incident commander Steve Goldman.

    There are mandatory evacuations of residences on Angeles Crest Highway between Mount Wilson Road and Islip Saddle, officials said. All of Mount Wilson is also under mandatory evacuation orders. These areas include Redbox, Mount Wilson, Charlton Flats, Chilao campground and day use area, Buckhorn campground, Jarvi dayuse area, and Islip Saddle.

    A temporary flight restriction was in place over the fire area, and a large plume of smoke could be seen throughout many parts of L.A. County.

    Regulators issued a smoke advisory Monday, warning of unhealthy air quality in the San Gabriel Mountains, the east San Gabriel Valley and the Pomona-Walnut Valley.

    "It is difficult to tell where smoke, ash or soot from a fire will go, or how winds will affect the level of these particles in the air, so we ask everyone to remember that smoke and ash can be harmful to health, even for people who are healthy,'' said Dr. Muntu Davis, health officer for Los Angeles County. "If you can see smoke, soot, or ash, or you can smell smoke, pay attention to your immediate environment and take precautions to safeguard your health. These precautions are particularly important for children, older adults, and people with heart or lung diseases.''

    The cause of the blaze remains under investigation.

    In L.A., several smaller fires broke out, including one in the Sepulveda Basin, which was contained to six acres. The El Dorado Fire near Yucaipa erupted Saturday and has scorched nearly 10,000 acres.

    City News Service contributed to this report.

  23. #73
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    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/sto...area-wildfire/

    The woman best known for popularizing gender reveal parties has a message for the world: Please stop.

    This week, as more than 7,000 acres in California were burned after a gender reveal led to a massive wildfire in San Bernardino County, blogger Jenna Karvunidis — who is largely credited for creating the gender reveal party — took to Facebook to condemn the over-the-top events.

    “Stop having these stupid parties. For the love of God, stop burning things down to tell everyone about your kid’s penis. No one cares but you,” she wrote.

    This isn’t the first time a gender reveal party has led to catastrophe, and yet the celebrations have only grown in popularity.

    Here’s how we got here.

    How these parties became deadly
    Karvunidis had her own gender reveal party back in 2008, before they became a Thing. She and her husband went what is now the more traditional route, though: cutting a cake that revealed an inside of pink frosting. A girl.

    “I just thought it would be really fun for everybody in the whole family to find out,” Karvunidis told NPR last year.

    She wrote about it on her blog, High Gloss And Sauce, and at the time it garnered some local attention.

    But since 2008, these celebrations of life have turned into risky endeavors. Though many still opt for the classic blue or pink cake reveal, others have taken more extreme routes.

    The current wildfire in California is massive, but it’s just small potatoes compared to a 2017 reveal in Arizona that led to a wildfire spanning 47,000 acres. It all happened when members at the party shot a makeshift target scrawled with the words “Boy” and “Girl.”

    When the target — packed with the highly explosive Tannerite — exploded, a blue cloud poofed upward and immediately ignited the surrounding brush.

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    It was a boy, and the party ended up costing the guilty patrons more than $8 million in restitution.

    Just this April, a gender reveal party in Florida also led to a 10-acre brush fire, after similarly using “Tannerite and a weapon” in the reveal, according to fire officials at the time.

    If the damage done by huge wildfires isn’t enough, such gender reveal parties have also led to property damage (like the plane crash last year in Texas, or the car that burst into flames in Australia).

    And, ironically, this celebration of life has also led to at least one death.

    Last October, in Iowa, an idea for a fun gender reveal party went south when the family unintentionally built a pipe bomb. When the device went off, it wasn’t just blue or pink gun powder that exploded, but the entire pipe did as well, sending shrapnel flying.

    A piece of metal hit a grandmother, who was standing about 45 feet away, and killed her.

    Parties uphold gender norms, critics say
    Danger aside, there’s also overwhelming criticism of the parties as a system that upholds the gender binary — that is, it’s either a boy, or a girl.

    Karvunidis herself has hinted at this criticism as well.

    In 2019, she wrote that “assigning focus on gender at birth leaves out so much of their potential and talents that have nothing to do with what’s between their legs.”

    Studies have backed up this same notion.

    One such study, published in 2017 by Carly Gieseler in the Journal of Gender Studies, characterized the harms of the gender reveal party like this: “It allows adults to recuperate what they have learned from their own gendered constructions, reinscribing expectations and assumptions onto the unwritten body of the unborn and propelling these ideals into the digital, social, public world.”

    As for Karvunidis’s daughter, the focus of that pinnacle pink cake in 2008, she’s “a girl who wears suits!” Karvunidis wrote — meaning to highlight the futility of celebrating these gender norms.

  24. #74
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/san...tura-counties/

    Santa Ana winds are expected to hit Los Angeles and Ventura counties on Tuesday and Wednesday, bringing critical conditions to the region as it also faces extreme heat and growing wildfires.

    A red flag warning has been issued for noon Tuesday through 8 p.m. Wednesday for the mountain and valley areas of the two counties due to “early season” gusty Santa Ana winds and low humidity, according to the National Weather Service.

    The winds follow a three-day heat wave that brought record triple-digit temperatures to much of California during Labor Day weekend.

    “Fuels after this historic heat wave will be at critical levels as we enter into the Santa Ana wind event,” the weather service warned.

    The region is already grappling with the Bobcat Fire north of Azusa and the El Dorado Fire near Yucaipa, and Santa Ana flare-ups could pose serious danger to residents, according to an incident commander on the Bobcat Fire.

    “The situation that we have right now is a life-threatening situation with the weather forecasts that we have for the next three days,” Steve Goldman of the Eastern Area Incident Management Team said Monday afternoon.

    Santa Ana conditions could potentially threaten Azusa, Bradbury, Arcadia and Sierra Madre in addition to Monrovia and Duarte, which are already close to the Bobcat Fire, Goldman said.

    “Because of the rate of spread of a fire like that — they’re all going to be in a warning or in an evacuation mode if you get a strong Santa Ana push to that fire,” he said.

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    California wildfires have burned more than 2 million acres, breaking record — and it’s only September
    The weather service warned the winds could fan the flames of new blazes as well.

    “This is a particularly dangerous period for new fires given the hot, dry, and windy conditions,” the agency said. “Fuel moisture conditions are very low at this time of the year and rapid fire spread will be possible.”

    Meanwhile, Los Angeles County officials warned of poor air quality caused by smoke and ash from the Bobcat Fire Monday, and nearly half of the state’s national forests temporarily closed due to the mixture of extreme heat and dangerous fire conditions.

    A red flag warning is already in place until 10 p.m. Monday in L.A. and Ventura counties, including near the 5 Freeway corridor. The southern coast and mountains of Santa Barbara were also under the Monday advisory.

    Riverside, San Bernardino and inland Orange counties also face red flag warnings Tuesday and Wednesday.

    California has already seen more than 2 million acres burn so far in 2020 — more than any year on record, and with the traditional fall fire season still to come.

  25. #75
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    More than a dozen California firefighters trying to protect a fire station from flames were overrun by the blaze Tuesday, and several were hurt. Elsewhere, military helicopters rescued more than 150 people stranded in the burning wilderness.

    Fourteen firefighters deployed emergency shelters as flames overtook them and destroyed the Nacimiento Station in the Los Padres National Forest on the state’s central coast, the U.S. Forest Service said. They suffered from burns and smoke inhalation, and three were flown to a hospital in Fresno, where one was in critical condition.

    The injuries came as wind-driven flames of more than two dozen major fires chewed through bone-dry California after a scorching Labor Day weekend that saw a dramatic airlift of more than 200.

    Rescue choppers pulled another 164 people from the Sierra National Forest through the morning and were working to rescue 17 others, said Gov. Gavin Newsom, who described pilots wearing night-vision goggles to find a place to land.

    “It’s where training meets the moment, but it always takes the courage, the conviction and the grit of real people doing real work,” said Newsom, who called the fires historic.

    California has already set a record with nearly 2.3 million acres (930,776 hectares) burned this year, and the worst part of the wildfire season is just beginning.

    The previous acreage record was set just two years ago and included the deadliest wildfire in state history, which was started by power lines and swept through the community of Paradise and killed 85 people.

    That 2018 blaze forced the state’s largest utility, Pacific Gas & Electric, to seek bankruptcy protection and guard against new disasters by cutting off power pre-emptively when fire conditions are exceptionally dangerous.

    With high and dry winds expected until Wednesday, the utility cut power to 172,000 customers over the weekend and more outages were expected in Northern California.

    More than 14,000 firefighters are battling fires around the state. Two of the three largest blazes in state history are burning in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    California was not alone: Hurricane-force winds and high temperatures kicked up wildfires across parts of the Pacific Northwest over the holiday weekend, burning hundreds of thousands of acres and mostly destroying the small town of Malden in eastern Washington.

    In Southern California, fires burned in Los Angeles, San Bernardino and San Diego counties, and the forecast called for the arrival of the region’s notorious Santa Ana winds. The U.S. Forest Service on Monday decided to close all eight national forests in the region and to shutter campgrounds statewide.
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    “Existing fires are displaying extreme fire behavior. New fire starts are likely. Weather conditions are worsening, and we simply do not have enough resources to fully fight and contain every fire,” said Randy Moore, a forester for the Forest Service’s Pacific Southwest region that covers California.

    Lynne Tolmachoff, spokeswoman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, known as Cal Fire, said it’s “unnerving” to have reached a record for acreage burned so soon. September and October usually are the worst months for fires because vegetation has dried out and high winds are more common.

    While the two mammoth San Francisco Bay Area fires were largely contained after burning for three weeks, firefighters struggled to corral several other major blazes ahead of the expected winds. Evacuation orders were expanded to more mountain communities Monday as the so-called Creek Fire burned through the Sierra National Forest in Central California.

    It was one of many recent major fires that displayed terrifyingly swift movement. The fire advanced 15 miles (24 kilometers) in a single day during the weekend. Since starting Friday from an unknown cause, it has burned 212 square miles (549 square kilometers). Forty-five homes and 20 other structures were confirmed destroyed so far.

    Debra Rios wasn’t home Monday when the order came to evacuate her hometown of Auberry, just northeast of Fresno. Sheriff’s deputies went to her ranch property to pick up her 92-year-old mother, Shirley MacLean. They reunited at an evacuation center.

    “I hope like heck the fire doesn’t reach my little ranch,” Rios said. “It’s not looking good right now. It’s an awfully big fire.”

    Mountain roads saw a steady stream of cars and trucks leaving the community of about 2,300 on Monday afternoon.

    Firefighters working in steep terrain saved the tiny town of Shaver Lake from flames that roared down hillsides toward a marina. About 30 houses were destroyed in the remote hamlet of Big Creek, resident Toby Wait said.

    “About half the private homes in town burned down,” he said. “Words cannot even begin to describe the devastation of this community.”

    A school, church, library, historic general store and a major hydroelectric plant were spared in the community of about 200 residents, Wait told the Fresno Bee.

    Sheriff’s deputies went door to door to make sure residents complied with evacuation orders. Officials hoped to keep the fire from pushing west toward Yosemite National Park.

    On Saturday, National Guard rescuers in two military helicopters airlifted 214 people to safety after flames trapped them in a wooded camping area near Mammoth Pool Reservoir. Twelve people were hospitalized, two of them with seriously injuries.

    One of the Southern California fires closed mountain roads in Angeles National Forest and forced the evacuation of the historic Mount Wilson Observatory. Late Monday night, the Los Angeles County Fire Department told residents of Duarte, Bradbury and Monrovia near the forest to get ready for a possible evacuation.

    Cal Fire said the so-called El Dorado Fire in San Bernardino County started Saturday morning when a smoke-generating pyrotechnic device was used by a couple to reveal their baby’s gender.

    https://ktla.com/news/california/pge...-ca-wildfires/

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