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Thread: The random plague, tick-borne disease, and similar related illnesses thread

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    The random plague, tick-borne disease, and similar related illnesses thread

    http://www.idahostatesman.com/news/l...213042289.html

    Here is a report of the Plague in Idaho

    A child in Elmore County was confirmed to be infected with the plague this week, according to the Central District Health Department, marking the first human diagnosis in Idaho since 1992.

    The child is recovering after receiving antibiotics.

    Cases of plague in Idaho were diagnosed in squirrels as recently as 2016, though none have been found in southern Ada County or Elmore County this year. It is unknown whether the child was exposed to the disease in Idaho or during a recent trip to Oregon.

    Plague has been found historically in wildlife in both states. Since 1990, there have been two cases of plague in humans in Idaho and eight in Oregon.

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    Senior Member blighted star's Avatar
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    I love modern plague stories. I have no idea why, they just intrigue me - much like exploding whales.

    In fact, I'm probably to blame for a lot (if not all) of MDS's plague & exploding whale posts

    Here's a couple of other plague threads


    http://mydeathspace.com/vb/showthrea...-Death-Returns

    http://mydeathspace.com/vb/showthrea...ague-Outrbreak

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    Senior Member blighted star's Avatar
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    Also, the last U.S plague case I remember reading about came from deer mice, I think? Be interesting to see which species they trace it back to this time.


    Edit :


    Here's a bit more info on the current case + some advice for avoiding infection in you're in an at-risk area

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.95444c29e9fa

    A boy in Idaho is recovering after contracting plague ? the first human case in the state in more than two decades, health officials say.

    Christine Myron, a spokeswoman for the Central District Health Department, said Wednesday that the child, who has not been publicly identified, is back home in Elmore County and ?doing well? after being treated with antibiotics in the hospital. The child became ill late last month and, earlier this week, health authorities received laboratory confirmation that he had bubonic plague, Myron said.

    Bubonic plague is the most common form and known for causing swollen lymph nodes or buboes, according to the World Health Organization. Pneumonic plague, which is based in the lungs, ?is the most virulent form of plague? and ?can be fatal? when not diagnosed and treated early on, according to the WHO.

    It is still unclear whether the child in Elmore County was exposed to the disease in Idaho or during a recent trip to Oregon, according to the Central District Health Department. It said that in 2015 and 2016, the disease was discovered in ground squirrels in Elmore County as well as nearby Ada County. No cases have been reported this year.


    Myron said human plague cases in the state are rare, with the most recent cases reported in 1991 and 1992.

    Symptoms of bubonic and pneumonic plague are similar and include headache, fever and chills, and extreme weakness, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC states that those with bubonic plague may also experience swollen lymph nodes and that those with pneumonic plague may experience pneumonia along with chest pain, coughing and trouble breathing.

    Sarah Correll, an epidemiologist with the Central District Health Department, said in a statement that plague can be spread to humans when they are bitten by infected fleas.

    ?People can decrease their risk by treating their pets for fleas and avoiding contact with wildlife,? Correll said. ?Wear insect repellent, long pants and socks when visiting plague affected areas.?

    To help prevent plague, the CDC recommends the following:

    ? Reduce rodent habitat around your home, workplace and recreational areas.

    ? Wear gloves if you are handling or skinning potentially infected animals to prevent contact between your skin and the plague bacteria.

    ? Use repellent if you think you could be exposed to rodent fleas during activities such as camping, hiking or working outdoors.

    ? Keep fleas off your pets by applying flea-control products.

    ? Do not allow dogs or cats that roam free in endemic areas to sleep on your bed.

    & a scientific article on how it mutated into the form that killed so many people


    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.b9d178606be2
    Last edited by blighted star; 06-15-2018 at 12:02 AM.

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    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    Post Squirrel tests positive for the bubonic plague in Colorado

    https://abcnews.go.com/US/squirrel-t...ry?id=71769840


    Yes this is news because the fear of other things to come is at play given the recent COVID-19 Second Wave that is under way in some states.


    Public health officials have announced that a squirrel in Colorado has tested positive for the bubonic plague.

    The town of Morrison, Colorado, in Jefferson County, which is just west of Denver, made the startling announcement saying that the squirrel is the first case of plague in the county.

    ?Plague is an infectious disease caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis, and can be contracted by humans and household animals if proper precautions are not taken,? officials from Jefferson County Public Health (JCPH) said in a statement released to the public.

    It is possible for humans to be infected with the bubonic plague through bites from infected fleas and by direct contact with blood or tissues of infected animals such as a cough or a bite.

    Jefferson County Public Health said that cats are highly susceptible to the plague from things like flea bites, a rodent scratch or bite, and ingesting an infected rodent. Cats can die if not treated quickly with antibiotics after contact with the plague.


    Officials also said that dogs are not as susceptible to the plague as cats are but still may pick up and carry plague-infected rodent fleas. Any pet owner who suspects that their pet is ill should contact a veterinarian immediately.

    ?Symptoms of plague may include sudden onset of high fever, chills, headache, nausea and extreme pain and swelling of lymph nodes, occurring within two to seven days after exposure. Plague can be effectively treated with antibiotics when diagnosed early. Anyone experiencing these symptoms should consult a physician,? said JCPH.

    Risk for contracting the bubonic plague is extremely low as long as the proper precautions are taken and JCPH published a list of them including eliminating all sources of food, shelter and access for wild animals around the home, not feeding wild animals, maintaining a litter and trash-free yard to reduce wild animal habitats, having people and pets should avoid all contact with sick or dead wild animals and rodents, using precaution when handling sick pets and having them examined by a veterinarian, consulting with a veterinarian about flea and tick control for pets and keeping pets from roaming freely outside the home where they may prey on wild animals and bring the disease home with them.

    ?All pet owners who live close to wild animal populations, such as prairie dog colonies or other known wildlife habitats, should consult their veterinarian about flea control for their pets to help prevent the transfer of fleas to humans,? JCPH said.
    According to the CDC, even though there is no vaccine for the plague, it can be treated successfully with antibiotics if caught within 24 hours of exhibiting symptoms.

    ?Arguably the most infamous plague outbreak was the so-called Black Death, a multi-century pandemic that swept through Asia and Europe,? according to National Geographic. ?It was believed to start in China in 1334, spreading along trade routes and reaching Europe via Sicilian ports in the late 1340s. The plague killed an estimated 25 million people, almost a third of the continent?s population. The Black Death lingered on for centuries, particularly in cities. Outbreaks included the Great Plague of London (1665-66), in which 70,000 residents died.

    However, the CDC says that there is now only an average of seven human plague cases per year and the WHO says the mortality rate is estimated to be between 8-10%.

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    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnLanders View Post
    https://abcnews.go.com/US/squirrel-t...ry?id=71769840


    Yes this is news because the fear of other things to come is at play given the recent COVID-19 Second Wave that is under way in some states.
    We're not in the second wave. We're in the second shut down. This is still the first wave. Just so you know.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

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    Senior Member KimTisha's Avatar
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    It's 2020, of course a Colorado squirrel is carrying the bubonic plague.

    Next week: Fire Breathing Birds Decimate Forest
    You are talking to a woman who has laughed in the face of death, sneered at doom and chuckled at catastrophe.
    ...Collector of Chairs. Reader of Books. Hater of Nutmeg...

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    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    Case of human plague identified Man (55) in northeastern Arizona

    https://www.abc15.com/news/region-no...astern-arizona


    HOLBROOK, Ariz. (AP) ? County health officials in northeastern Arizona said a man has contracted the human plague and are warning the public to take precautions to limit the risk of exposure.

    Navajo County Assistant Manager Bryan Layton said Friday that a man over the age of 55 was being treated for the disease amid an investigation into how it was contracted.

    Humans typically get plague after being bitten by an infected flea that is carrying the plague bacterium or by handling an animal infected with plague.

    The Navajo County Health Department encouraged people to avoid rodent burrows and keep dogs on a leash.

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    https://www.krqe.com/news/new-mexico...nta-fe-county/

    Another plague report in New Mexico

    SANTA FE, N.M. (KRQE) – The New Mexico Department of Health reports that a man in his 60s from Santa Fe County has been diagnosed with bubonic plague. This is the first human plague case in the state in 2020.

    NMDOH reports the man is recovering at a local hospital and that an environmental investigation will take place at the individual’s home in order to look for ongoing risks to immediate family members, neighbors, and others in the community. “This is a reminder that even during a pandemic, other infectious diseases are out that can still put your health at risk,” said Department of Health Secretary Kathy Kunkel in a press release. “All New Mexicans need to be aware of the risks for contracting diseases like plague and take the necessary precautions to avoid them.”

    The plague is a bacterial disease of wildlife and is typically transmitted to humans and pets after being bitten by infected fleas. Pets can also be exposed to the disease after eating an infected animal.

    To prevent the plague, the New Mexico Department of Health recommends the following:

    Avoid sick or dead rodents and rabbits and their nests and burrows
    Prevent pets from roaming and hunting
    Talk to your veterinarian about using an appropriate flea control product on your pets as they are not all safe for cats, dogs, or children
    Clean up areas near your home where rodents could live such as woodpiles, brush piles, junk, and abandoned vehicles
    Have sick pets examined immediately by a veterinarian
    See your doctor about any unexplained illness involving a sudden and severe fever
    Put hay, wood, and compost piles as far as possible from your home
    Don’t leave your pet’s food and water where rodents and wildlife can get to it
    NMDOH states that symptoms of the plague in humans include a sudden onset of fever, headache, chills, and weakness. In the majority of cases, there is also a painful swelling of the lymph node in the armpit, groin, or neck areas.

    If diagnosed quickly and with appropriate antibiotic treatment, the fatality rate in people and pets can be greatly reduced. Physicians who suspect plague are asked to immediately report to NMDOH by calling 505-827-0006.

    In 2019, NMDOH states there was one human plague case in a man in his 70s from Torrance County. There were no human plague cases in 2018. This year, there has been one animal plague case in a dog from Santa Fe County and two cases in 2018.

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    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    The random plague, tick-borne disease, and similar related illnesses thread

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0723115835.htm

    Researchers have confirmed that Heartland virus, an emerging pathogen with potentially dire consequences for those infected, is present in Lone Star ticks in two Illinois counties hundreds of miles apart. Lone Star ticks were first detected in Illinois in 1999, but had not been found to be infected with Heartland virus in the state.

    The findings are reported in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

    In July 2018, a resident of Kankakee County was hospitalized after suffering several tick bites while camping on private property. Two months later and more than 250 miles to the south, a resident of Williamson County was hospitalized with many of the same symptoms: fever, diarrhea, headache, fatigue, decreased appetite and nausea. This patient also noticed tick bites after camping. The Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention confirmed that clinical samples from both patients tested positive for Heartland virus, which is spread by ticks. Both patients eventually recovered.

    Tick-borne illnesses share symptoms with many other diseases and misdiagnoses sometimes occur, said Holly Tuten, a vector ecologist with the Illinois Natural History Survey who led the new research. INHS is a division of the Prairie Research Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

    "Heartland virus won't show up on a standard diagnostic panel for tick-borne bacterial diseases," she said. "And with COVID-19 on the collective mind, a tick-borne viral infection could be overlooked, especially in cases where a tick bite was missed."

    According to the CDC, there are no vaccines to prevent infection with the Heartland virus or medications to treat it. Most people infected with the virus end up hospitalized and a few have died.

    To determine the source of the viral infections, health department officials in each county interviewed the patients to learn where they were when they were bit. This information allowed Tuten and her team to determine whether ticks in those areas carried the virus.

    Previous research showed that the Lone Star tick, Amblyomma americanum, can carry and transmit the Heartland virus, so the researchers focused their efforts on collecting this species.

    "Lone Star ticks are very aggressive ambush predators and many people don't realize this," Tuten said. "I've seen Lone Star ticks run across a forest floor to me."

    The site in Kankakee County was a rural homestead with barnyard animals and a small amount of forest surrounded by cropland, Tuten said. The patient in Williamson County may have been exposed in a heavily wooded wildlife refuge or outside a suburban home with a few trees.

    The researchers collected ticks in all three locales. They shipped their tick samples to the CDC Arboviral Diseases Branch in Fort Collins, Colorado, where the ticks were combined in batches of 10-30 for testing.

    "A single batch of male Lone Star ticks from each county was found to be positive for the Heartland virus," Tuten said. "Infected Lone Star ticks had been found as far north as Missouri, so we expected to find the infections in ticks from Williamson County in the southern part of Illinois. But finding so many Lone Star ticks in Kankakee County, including some with the virus, really surprised us."

    The detection of Heartland virus in adult Lone Star ticks a year after human infection suggests that the infected ticks may have overwintered in the area, Tuten said.

    "We want to alert physicians and public health officials throughout Illinois that there is a fairly new pathogen out there that is a danger to public health," she said. "I don't want people to avoid the woods and parks. I just want them to be aware, so they can take concrete steps to reduce tick encounters and bites."

    This investigation was a collaboration between the INHS Medical Entomology Laboratory, the Illinois Department of Public Health, the CDC, conservation officials and Illinois residents.

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    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.who.int/csr/don/23-july-2020-plague-drc/en/

    The health zone of Rethy in Ituri province, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, has seen an upsurge of plague cases since June 2020. The first case, a 12-year-old girl, reported to a local health centre on 12 June experiencing a headache, fever, cough, and an enlarged lymph node. She died on the same day and further deaths from the community due to suspected cases of plague were subsequently reported.

    From 11 June though 15 July, six out of 22 health areas have been affected within Rethy health zone (11 villages), with a total of 45 cases including nine deaths (case fatality rate: 20%). All nine (9) cases who died presented with signs of headache, high fever, and painful nodes; four (4) out of the nine (9) cases had cough.

    The health zone team carried out an investigation resulting in five positive rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). Nine additional samples were taken and shipped to the Institut National de Recherche Biom?dicale (INRB) laboratory in Kinshasa. Of the 45 cases reported, two showed signs of septicemic plague; all the other cases were diagnosed as having bubonic plague. According to the available information, it is likely that all three types of plague clinical presentation (bubonic, septicemic and pneumonic) are present.

    The distribution by sex shows 58% (26/45) are male and 93% (42/45) are greater than five years old. Of the 45 cases reported, nine including four who died, had cough among the symptoms - a sign indicating a potential progression from bubonic plague to pulmonary plague. This was specifically noticed among the deceased.

    Plague is endemic in Ituri province. Since the beginning of 2020, Ituri Province has reported a total of 64 plague cases and 14 deaths (CFR:21.8%) in five health zones, namely Aungba, Linga, Rethy, Aru and Kambala health zones. This compares against 10 cases and 5 deaths (lethality 50.0%) during the same period in 2019, all in a single zone.

    The current COVID-19 epidemic affects seven out of 26 provinces in the country. Ituri has also reported cases of COVID-191 that may further interrupt response activities due to lockdown. These are in addition to long standing public health response challenges identified in the region, including a lack of resources and insecurity. Although it has been reported that there is no significant impact of the COVID-19 context on activities taking place in this area, there is limited information available on the current access to health care. This includes whether or not there is a need for the population of Ituri to seek care in Uganda, as well as the availability of human resources, drugs, and personal protective equipment (PPE). Furthermore, the reference laboratory in Bunia, Ituri province is currently not functional, which might delay the confirmation of suspected cases and response efforts.

    Public health response
    A national rapid response team (RRT) has been deployed to the affected health zone to conduct an outbreak investigation and implement initial response activities.
    UNICEF is on the ground responding to the humanitarian situation at Bunia, working on community engagement and safe and dignified burial practices.
    The WHO guideline for plague, including case definitions, has been disseminated to health facilities to improve the detection of cases.
    The WHO is supporting plague endemic areas with surveillance, investigation of cases, and training of health workers and community relays in the prevention, early detection and case management of plague.
    Doxycycline prophylaxis has been administrated to the listed contacts.
    Intra-household spraying with deltamethrin has been used in some villages.
    Safe and dignified burials (SDB) have been performed by the health district team.
    Sensitization of the population on plague prevention measures in the affected villages through local radio.
    WHO risk assessment
    Infection with plague can cause severe disease resulting in high mortality in humans, particularly if not identified early. Plague can exhibit in three forms: bubonic, septicemic and pneumonic. If untreated, bubonic plague can evolve to pneumonic plague. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential for survival and reduction of complications.

    Rethy health zone is endemic for plague and regularly registers cases of enzootic variants of Yersinia pestis, in much of the wild rodent population. Its first outbreak was reported in February 2020 with cases imported from Linga health zone, based in the Godjoka health area.

    On the security level, there are reports of atrocities and violence linked to the militia CODECO which continues to impact the population of this territory (Djugu and its surroundings). There have been mass population displacements within Djugu and Mahagi Territories. Currently, the Rethy Health Zone has received approximately 112 714 internally displaced persons (IDPs), most of whom have come from the Jiba and Linga Health Zone. The growing insecurity impacts traffic flow between the villages and the willingness of the population to either stay or work in that area. There has also been a deterioration of water, hygiene and sanitation conditions in the reception areas and in the IDP sites.

    The early detection and reporting of the current outbreak by healthcare workers demonstrate that a functioning surveillance system is in place. Ituri province had a reference laboratory in Bunia which is no longer functional. The Institut National de la Recherce Biomedicale (INRB) laboratory based in Kinshasa/DRC has the ability to conduct laboratory testing for suspected cases. However, delays in shipping samples from Rethy to Bunia and then to Kinshasa, and delays in testing in Kinshasa INRB due to high workload and backload related to COVID-19 samples to be tested, might jeopardize the surveillance and response. Ongoing efforts are required to ensure that any other cases are promptly detected, isolated, and investigated to avoid the establishment of local transmission.

    The risk at national level is considered to be moderate given: the evolution of the current situation is in danger of deteriorating rapidly (case fatality rate: 20%), the notification of cases of pulmonary plague, the challenges with the surveillance system and delays between sample collection and laboratory confirmation, and the volatile security situation and the existence of other epidemics in progress in the country which prevents the setting up of a more comprehensive response. Furthermore, the health zone currently does not have enough PPE, body bags and materials needed for decontamination. Malteser International, an NGO that supplies the health zone with drugs, has had difficulty getting the products into the zone because of insecurity on the RN27 road.

    The principles of control are known and have been implemented (early treatment with the recommended antibiotics, isolation of the pneumonic cases, chemoprophylaxis given to the close contacts of the latest ones, rodent and flea control, safe and dignified burials, and the prevention of nosocomial transmission) but the means are limited and the health system is unable to manage the cases in the most appropriate way. The antibiotics used for the treatment of the cases are Doxycycline, Ciprofloxacin and Cotrimoxazole. For the pulmonary or septicemic form case, Gentamycin was administrated. The lack of laboratory confirmation is worrying but the use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) on the field ensures a minimum of confirmation among the suspected cases. The RDTs are especially reliable to confirm bubonic plague suspected forms.

    The risk at regional level is considered low since the epidemic seems to be contained in the Rethy health zone and that it is an isolated region. The risk is considered low globally.
    .

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    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    WHO advice
    Bubonic plague is the most common form of plague and is caused by the bite of an infected flea. The plague bacillus, Y. pestis, enters at the bite site and travels through the lymphatic system to the nearest lymph node where it replicates. At advanced stages of the infection, the inflamed lymph nodes can turn into suppurating open sores. There is no inter-human transmission of bubonic plague.

    Untreated, bubonic plague can advance and spread to the lungs, which is the more severe type of plague called pneumonic plague, the most virulent form of plague. Incubation period can be as short as 24 hours. Any person with pneumonic plague may transmit the disease via droplets to other humans. Untreated pneumonic plague, if not diagnosed and treated early, is almost always fatal. However, the probability of recovery is high if detected and treated in time (within 24 hours of onset of symptoms).

    Early diagnosis and treatment are essential for survival and reduction of complications. Appropriate diagnostic samples include blood cultures, lymph node aspirates if possible, and/or sputum, if indicated. Drug therapy should begin as soon as possible after the laboratory specimens are taken. Post-exposure prophylaxis is indicated in persons with known exposure to plague, such as close contact with a pneumonic plague patient or direct contact with infected body fluids or tissues. Duration of post-exposure prophylaxis to prevent plague is seven days.

    Preventive measures include informing people when zoonotic plague is present in their environment and advising them to take precautions against flea bites and not to handle animal carcasses. People, especially health workers, should also avoid direct contact with infected tissues such as buboes, or close exposure to patients with pneumonic plague.

    Recommended response measures for all forms of plague:

    Obtain specimens which should be carefully collected using appropriate infection, prevention and control procedures and sent to labs for testing. Confirmation of plague requires lab testing. The best practice is to identify Y. pestis from a sample of pus from a bubo, blood or sputum. A specific Y. pestis antigen can be detected by different techniques
    Ensure correct treatment: Prompt treatment with the correct medications is critical to prevent complications. Verify that patients are being given appropriate antibiotic treatment such as aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, chloramphenicol, tetracyclines sulfonamides and supportive therapy. The antibiotic treatment may need to be adjusted depending on a patient’s age, medical history, underlying health conditions, or allergies. Duration of treatment is 10 to 14 days, or until 2 days after fever subsides.
    Protect health workers. Inform and train them on infection prevention and control. Workers in direct contact with pneumonic plague patients must wear a full personal protective equipment and use standard precautions for respiratory diseases. Depending on the circumstances, they can also take a chemoprophylaxis with antibiotics such as doxycycline for the duration of seven days or at least as long as they are exposed to infected patients. However, the chemoprophylaxis cannot replace the use of a PPE and the individual physical precautions.
    Isolate patients with pneumonic plague. Patients with confirmed or suspected pneumonic plague should be isolated so as not to infect others via air droplets. Provide masks for pneumonic patients.
    Contact follow up: identify, inform and monitor close contacts of pneumonic plague patients and provide them with a seven-day chemoprophylaxis
    Ensure safe burial practices. Optimal infection prevention and control measures are to be observed during funeral and burial ceremonies. Funeral ceremonies in the houses of plague victims which may involve assembly of people should be discouraged.
    In order to effectively and efficiently manage plague outbreaks it is crucial to have an informed and vigilant health care work force (and community) to quickly diagnose and manage patients with infection, to identify risk factors, to conduct ongoing surveillance, to control vectors and hosts, to confirm diagnosis with laboratory tests, and to communicate findings with appropriate authorities.
    1As of 16 July 2020, there have been 8 162 confirmed COVID-19 cases including 191 deaths in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
    https://www.who.int/csr/don/23-july-2020-plague-drc/en/

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    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    http://outbreaknewstoday.com/drc-mon...ases-top-2500/

    Since the beginning of the year through July 5, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) has reported a total of 2,591 suspected monkeypox cases and 97 deaths.


    Monkeypox/CDC
    This includes 115 cases and four deaths recorded during the week ending July 5.

    In 2019, DRC saw 5,288 monkeypox cases, including 107 deaths (CFR: 2%) from 133 health zones in 19 provinces.

    The World Health Organization says one major challenge to the current emergency include acquiring the required funding to respond to all the multiple ongoing outbreaks in the country.

    In addition to the monkeypox outbreak, the DRC is battling outbreaks of Ebola, measles, malaria, acute respiratory infections, typhoid, COVID-19, cholera, meningitis, diarrhea with dehydration in children under the age of five years, influenza and yellow fever.

    Monkeypox is a rare disease that occurs throughout remote parts of Central and West Africa, often near tropical rainforests. It is spread through contact with the monkeypox virus from an animal or human (alive or dead) or with materials contaminated with the virus.

    Symptoms begin with fever, headache, muscle aches, swollen lymph nodes and exhaustion, and is followed by a rash. Patients are usually ill for 2-4 weeks. Monkeypox is fatal in as many as 10% of people who get it.

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    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    The random plague, tick-borne disease, and similar related illnesses thread

    I am going to combine some of the random one off stories that have been posted recently.

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    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://abc7ny.com/onion-recall-salm...ional/6361357/

    LOS ANGELES -- Health officials said a salmonella outbreak linked to red onions from a California supplier has sickened hundreds more people than originally reported.

    The recall has also expanded to salads, sandwiches and other products produced by a multi-state supermarket chain and a Texas-based health food company.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported a total of 640 cases and 85 hospitalizations in 43 states as of Friday. This count reflects an additional 244 ill and 26 hospitalized in 10 new states: Alabama (1), Connecticut (2), Delaware (1), Georgia (1), Massachusetts (2), Mississippi (2), New Hampshire (1), New Jersey (2), New Mexico (1) and West Virginia (2).

    The FDA is investigating Thomson International, Inc. of Bakersfield, Calif, as a likely source of potentially contaminated red onions. The company issued a voluntary recall on all of its onions -- red, white, yellow and sweet -- due to possible cross-contamination.

    Taylor Farms Texas in Dallas and Giant Eagle -- with grocery stores across Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Indiana and Maryland -- have issued voluntary recalls on onions and products containing onions. Neither company received reports of illness related to their products.

    States with previously reported cases include Alaska (6), Arizona (14), California (76), Colorado (14), Florida (3), Idaho (26), Illinois (41), Indiana (2), Iowa (20), Kansas (2), Kentucky (1), Maine (4), Maryland (1), Michigan (36), Minnesota (14), Missouri (6), Montana (52), Nebraska (10), Nevada (8), New York (5), North Carolina (5), North Dakota (8), Ohio (8), Oregon (85), Pennsylvania (9), South Carolina (1), South Dakota (17), Tennessee (5), Utah (90), Virginia (8), Washington (25), Wisconsin (7) and Wyoming (16). Texas is no longer listed as a state with a reported case.
    No deaths were reported.

    Advice for consumers

    The CDC issued the following recommendations to consumers looking to avoid contaminated onions:

    At home, check your refrigerator and kitchen. Check the package or look for a sticker on the onion to see if it is from Thomson International, Inc. If it is, don't eat it. Throw it away. Other brand names that may be on labels include Thomson Premium, TLC Thomson International, Tender Loving Care, El Competitor, Hartley's Best, Onions 52, Majestic, Imperial Fresh, Kroger, Utah Onions and Food Lion.

    Check premade products. Some foods made with recalled onions have also been recalled. This includes deli salads and vegetable mixes.

    If you can't tell where your onions are from, don't eat them. Throw them away.

    Wash and sanitize. Clean any surfaces that may have come in contact with onions or their packagings, such as countertops, storage bins, refrigerator drawers, knives and cutting boards.

    Check with restaurants and grocery stores. When you order food from a restaurant or shop for food, check to make sure they are not serving or selling recalled onions from Thomson International, Inc., or any foods prepared with recalled onions, including foods such as salads, sandwiches, tacos, salsas and dips.


    What is salmonella?

    Salmonella is a bacteria that can give you an infection called salmonellosis. Most human infections are caused by the consumption of food that is contaminated with the bacteria, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports.

    Contracting an intestinal infection from salmonella can lead to diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps. These symptoms usually appear within three days after infection and usually go away in four to seven days.

    In some cases, the infection may spread to the bloodstream and other parts of the body. These cases are associated with more severe diarrhea which can lead to hospitalization. Severe cases can be deadly if not treated promptly with antibiotics.

  16. #16
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.microbe.tv/twim/twim-223/

    https://www.newsweek.com/bubonic-pla...nation-1524592

    A man died from bubonic plague in western Mongolia on Tuesday after coming into contact with dead marmots, according to local health officials.

    The 42-year-old from Khovd Province reportedly purchased two of the large rodents before contracting the disease, a spokesperson for the country's health ministry said.

    The spokesperson, Dorj Narangerel, urged citizens to avoid hunting or eating marmots, which are carriers of the disease in the region, Chinese state-run news agency Xinhua reported.

    It is illegal to hunt marmots in Mongolia. However, at least one person dies from plague every year in the country, usually after eating or coming into contact with marmots—a large member of the squirrel family.

    Many people in Mongolia consider the rodent a delicacy, with the meat believed to provide health benefits.

    The landlocked Asian country has confirmed four cases of bubonic plague this year, among a total of 12 suspected cases. In July, a 15-year-old boy in the neighboring Mongolian province of Govi-Altai died from the disease around three days after eating marmot meat, according to the country's National Center for Zoonotic Diseases (NCZD).

    In fact, the NCZD said that 17 out of 21 Mongolian provinces are now at risk of bubonic plague cases.

    Get your unlimited Newsweek trial >

    According to Mongolian health authorities, more than 70 people who had recently been in close contact with the deceased 42-year-old will now be placed in quarantine and tested for the disease.

    Bubonic plague is a potentially deadly disease caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis, which initially affects the lymph nodes, leading to swellings known as buboes. It has a mortality rate of around 30-50 percent if left untreated. Modern antibiotics are effective against the illness.

    Although this is the most common form of plague, infection with the bacteria can also cause other diseases, such as pneumonic and septicemic plague, which primarily affect the lungs and blood respectively, and are invariably fatal without prompt treatment.

    The Yersinia pestis bacteria is usually carried by small mammals, such as rats and marmots, as well as the fleas that live on them. The bacteria is typically transmitted to humans through the bites of these fleas. However, infection can occur after direct contact with the tissue or bodily fluids of an infected animal.

    Thus, if people are able to avoid contact with rodents known to be carriers, they are unlikely to become infected. Transmission of the plague bacteria from human to human is very rare and only occurs when someone is in close contact with an individual who has pneumonic plague and breathes in their infectious cough droplets.

    "There are rarely large outbreaks of plague. Plague is a relatively rare disease, showing it is quite hard for humans to be infected," Michael Head, senior research fellow in global health at the University of Southampton, U.K., told Newsweek.

    This month, health officials in the Inner Mongolia region of China—which borders the country of Mongolia—also reported two plague deaths. These cases prompted officials in the nearby Russian region of Buryatia to begin testing rodents for the plague and issue warnings to residents not to hunt or eat marmots.

    Meanwhile, the Russian regions of Trans-Baikal and the Altai Republic are also monitoring the prevalence of the pathogen. Furthermore, the Republic of Tuva, which borders Mongolia, has begun a mass vaccination campaign to prevent the spread of plague.

    So far, more than 3,000 people have been vaccinated as part of the campaign in the region after "a large distribution of the plague pathogen" was detected in two districts, according to Rospotrebnadzor, Russia's health watchdog.

    While plague—the cause of the infamous "Black Death" pandemic of the Middle Ages—is rare today, it has not totally been confined to the history books.

    A few hundred cases of bubonic plague are typically recorded every year around the world, with most occurring in Asia and parts of Africa, although isolated cases are also found in places such as the U.S.

  17. #17
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.india.com/news/world/bub...ested-4109827/

    New Delhi: Another person died of the deadly Bubonic plague in western Mongolia on Wednesday after a series of cases emerged in the East Asian country and its neighbouring China. All 70 people who came in contact with the deceased will be tested for the bacterial disease. Also Read - 'COVID-19 to Border Aggression', Indian Envoy Touches Upon Challenges Faced by Country in 2020

    According to reports, the 42-year-old man had bought two dead marmots before falling ill, which is being suspected as the source of the infection. The government has launched several campaigns to discourage people from consuming the mammals as fleas that cause the disease tend to cling to their hair. Also Read - Why Are People sitting in Power Scared of Naming China, Asks Congress

    Last month, a 15-year-old boy had succumbed to plague in another province in Mongolia. Also Read - Galwan Clash: 'Onus Not on China, Discipline Frontline Troops': China 'Urges' India to Stop 'Provocative Acts'

    Earlier this year, China became the epicentre of another deadly infection after COVID-19 as Bayannur – a city in the northern part – sounded a level 3 alert in the region.


    Bubonic plague, previously known as the Black Death, is a bacterial infection caused by Yersinia pestis, spread by fleas living on wild rodents such as marmots, and is characterised by symptoms including fever, chills, headaches, swelling in the lymph nodes under the arms, in the neck, and groin.

    It had caused a global epidemic of bubonic plague that occurred in the mid-1300s. It majorly affected Europe and Asia killing around 200 million people worldwide. This is considered as one of the most fatal pandemics recorded in human history.

  18. #18
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    New Mexico Man (20's) Dies From Plague 2 Weeks After First Case Reported In State

    https://www.newsweek.com/new-mexico-...-state-1523828

    A New Mexico man has died from septicemic plague just two weeks after the state reported its first case.

    The man, who was in his 20s, died after being hospitalized, the New Mexico Department of Health reported Friday. Officials will conduct an environmental investigation at the man's Rio Arriba County home to assess any potential risk posed to family members, neighbors and the surrounding community, according to a health department news release.

    The case marks the state's second plague case this year, with doctors diagnosed a Santa Fe County man with bubonic plague less than two weeks ago. The health department reported that case July 27, but said the man, who is in his 60s, was recovering in a hospital.

    Plague activity in New Mexico is typically highest during the summer season, Department of Health Secretary Kathy Kunkel said in the news release.


    "It is especially important now to take precautions to avoid rodents and their fleas which can expose you to plague," Kunkel said.

    Plague is a potentially lethal infectious disease that is caused by bacteria living primarily in rodents and their fleas, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If caught early enough, plague can be treated with antibiotics, although there is no vaccine.

    Bubonic plague is historically known as the Black Death, which was one of the world's deadliest recorded pandemics. It killed an estimated 50 million people across much of Europe in the fourteenth century. This is still the most common form of plague seen in humans, and is known to cause painful, swollen lymph nodes in the groin or armpit in addition to fever, chills and coughing, according to CDC.


    If left untreated, bubonic plague can move into the bloodstream, causing septicemic plague. Symptoms of this disease include fever, chills, extreme weakness and skin and other tissues turning black and dying. Septicemic plague can also occur as the first symptom of plague.

    It was not immediately clear whether the Rio Arriba County man had contracted septicemic plague on its own or after coming down with bubonic plague. Newsweek contacted the New Mexico Department of Health for comment, but did not hear back in time for publication.

    The department recommended that New Mexicans avoid sick or dead rodents, prevent pets from roaming, use flea control for pets and ensure areas around the home are clean from places where rodents could nest.

    The Rio Arriba County man marked the state's first plague-related death in New Mexico since 2015. There were two animal plague cases in the state this year, both in Santa Fe County involving a dog and a cat, the release stated.

    In recent decades, an average of seven human plague cases are reported in the U.S. each year, with many of them originating in the western part of the country. There was just one reported case of plague in 2018, according to the most recently available data from the CDC.

    Animal plague cases are much higher, although the exact number in the U.S. is unknown due to the number of rodents who could contract the disease. Health officials in Colorado announced earlier this month that a squirrel had tested positive for bubonic plague, after being the fifteenth squirrel to have died within a short period.

  19. #19
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://losalamosreporter.com/2020/0...nary-syndrome/

    DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH NEWS

    A Taos County man in his 50s is hospitalized with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), a severe and sometimes fatal respiratory disease in humans that’s transmitted by infected rodents through exposure to their urine, droppings or saliva.

    The patient reported to the New Mexico Department of Health he had cleaned a rodent-infested shed about three weeks before he began to feel sick.

    People are usually exposed to hantavirus around their homes, cabins or sheds especially when they clean out or explore enclosed, poorly ventilated areas that have lots of mouse droppings. Hantavirus particles are small and light enough that they can be carried in the air and be inhaled by humans.

    Early symptoms of HPS infection may look and feel like the flu or a “stomach bug” and include fever and muscle aches, possibly with chills, headache, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain and cough which can progress to respiratory distress and severe illness.

    Symptoms typically develop within one to six weeks after rodent exposure, and although there is no specific treatment for HPS, chances for recovery are better if medical attention is sought early and the healthcare provider is told about the exposure to rodents or their droppings. The deer mouse is the main carrier for Sin Nombre virus, which is the hantavirus strain found in New Mexico.

    Two of New Mexico’s three HPS cases last year died. All three of the victims were from McKinley County. There were no cases of HPS in 2018.

    The best way to prevent contracting HPS is Seal Up – Trap Up – Clean Up:

    Air out closed‐up buildings such as cabins and sheds, as well as abandoned or stored vehicles before entering
    Trap mice until they are all gone
    Seal up any entry points in homes and shelters where rodents can slide in unnoticed.
    Soak nests and droppings with a disinfectant such as a 10 percent bleach solution before cleaning them up
    Don’t vigorously sweep up rodent droppings as you would anything else because that’s when the virus can become airborne and inhaled
    Keep hay, wood, and compost piles that attract rodents as far as possible from your home
    Get rid of any trash and junk piles where rodents can live
    Don’t leave your pet’s food and water where mice can get to it

  20. #20
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/pol...d-from-africa/

    Congrats

    It seems like a good time for a bit of good news – after two decades of concerted effort, wild-type polio has been eliminated entirely from Africa. There are now only two countries in the world with endemic wild polio, Pakistan and Afghanistan. Once again, we are on the brink of worldwide polio eradication. The world needs to come together for one final push to eradicate this disease forever.

    I say “once again” because we were here 20 years ago, but missed our chance. In 2002 the World Health Organization predicted they could eliminate polio from the last African country, Nigeria, by the end of the year. Then, by 2005, they hoped to eradicate polio from the last countries on Earth, India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. Those hopes were dashed, however, by anti-vaccine rumors spreading in Nigeria.

    Specifically some Muslim clerics were concerned that the vaccine program was entirely introduced by Westerners whom they did not trust. They spread fears that the vaccine either contained the AIDS virus as a campaign of deliberate infection, or sterilizing agents so that Muslim women could not have children. This led to decreased vaccine compliance, and polio cases in Nigeria skyrocketed from single-digits to over a thousand, eventually spreading to other African nations. It has taken almost two decades to crawl back to where we were in 2002, and now the WHO’s efforts have succeeded in achieving zero cases of wild-type polio in Africa.

    Polio is caused by a virus that infects motor neurons in the spinal cord. When these nervous cells die, this breaks the connection between the brain and the muscles those cells connected to. Further, these motor neurons keep muscle cells alive and healthy, so once the neuron dies, then the muscle cells they were previously connected to atrophy and eventually die also. The result is muscle wasting and weakness.

    There are three strains of wild-type poliovirus. Two of these strains have already been eradicated from the world, but one remains. There is also vaccine-derived polio (see this discussion of the two types of vaccines). In rare cases the live virus vaccine can spontaneously mutate back to a more infectious type, and cause an actual polio infection. This vaccine-derived virus can then spread to those who are not protected by vaccination.

    This happens when the live attenuated virus from the vaccine is excreted by the person vaccinated and gets into the local water supply. There it can spread to others in the community. This is actually mostly a good thing, because it can produce immunity in those who are exposed. The vaccine also protects against this vaccine-derived virus, and so the spread is limited in a vaccinated population. If, however, there are large numbers of unvaccinated people, the vaccine-derived virus can last for longer in the environment. This gives the virus more time to mutate, and on very rare occasions can mutate back to a form that can produce paralysis. If a community is fully vaccinated, however, this won’t happen.

    To put this into perspective, the WHO estimates that the polio vaccine program in Africa over the last 20 years prevented millions of cases of wild-type polio, but caused hundreds of cases of vaccine-derived polio – about 10,000 cases prevented for every one case produced. Further, newer versions of the vaccine, which do not include the wild-type-2 strain of the virus which has been eradicated, produce much fewer cases of vaccine-derived paralysis.

    The bottom line is that a thorough vaccine campaign prevents both wild-type polio and, ironically, vaccine-derived polio (by reducing the duration of spread in the environment and therefore opportunity to mutate).

    It should also be emphasized that it is possible to fully eradicate polio. The virus has no non-human host, no reservoir in which it can survive and re-infect people. So if we reduce human cases to zero – the virus is gone. Just as with smallpox, it can be completely eradicated. But this is an all-or-nothing game. Close is not good enough. Polio is a highly contagious virus. If even a single case remains and spreads, we could be seeing hundreds of thousands of cases worldwide within a decade. This means that all countries need to keep up their polio vaccine program until worldwide eradication is achieved.

    How close are we? So far in 2020 there have been 37 reported cases (of the wild-type infection) in Afghanistan and 65 cases in Pakistan (and zero in the rest of the world). Those numbers are low, but they can increase rapidly if vaccine efforts are not maintained. There is an aggressive vaccine program in these remaining countries but, as the WHO reports:

    Unfortunately, children are still missing out on vaccination for various reasons including lack of infrastructure, remote locations, population movement, conflict and insecurity and resistance to vaccination.

    In Afghanistan resistance is coming mainly from the Taliban, but not because they fear the vaccine, they fear Western spies and drone strikes. They have essentially banned door-to-door vaccine efforts in the territories they control. They do allow vaccine clinics, but these are too sparse to reach everyone who needs to be vaccinated. We need to get to 95% coverage to stop spread of the virus. This is a purely political problem, and may be the final stumbling block that prevents worldwide eradication.

    There is a lot going on in the world, especially with a pandemic, but the fate of polio should not be overlooked. Eradication is permanent, and failure to eradicate means the entire world is still at risk for renewed polio outbreaks. This issue should be getting far more attention than it’s getting. The entire world has a stake in this, and the attention of the world should be fixed on Pakistan and Afghanistan until we cross the finish line. At this point, any resources spent to achieve this goal are worth it.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-53887947

    Africa has been declared free from wild polio by the independent body, the Africa Regional Certification Commission.
    Polio usually affects children under five, sometimes leading to irreversible paralysis. Death can occur when breathing muscles are affected.
    Twenty-five years ago thousands of children in Africa were paralysed by the virus.
    The disease is now only found in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
    There is no cure but the polio vaccine protects children for life.
    Africa Live: Updates on this and other stories
    Nigeria is the last African country to be declared free from wild polio, having accounted for more than half of all global cases less than a decade ago.
    1px transparent line
    The vaccination campaign in Nigeria involved a huge effort to reach remote and dangerous places under threat from militant violence and some health workers were killed in the process.
    What is polio and has it now been eradicated in Africa?
    Polio is a virus which spreads from person to person, usually through contaminated water. It can lead to paralysis by attacking the nervous system.
    Two out of three strains of wild polio virus have been eradicated worldwide. On Tuesday, Africa has been declared free of the last remaining strain of wild poliovirus.
    More than 95% of Africa's population has now been immunised. This was one of the conditions that the Africa Regional Certification Commission set before declaring the continent free from wild polio.
    Now only the vaccine-derived polio virus remains in Africa with 177 cases being identified this year.
    This is a rare form of the virus that mutates from the oral polio vaccine and can then spread to under-immunised communities.
    The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified a number of these cases in Nigeria, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Central African Republic and Angola.

    Without a cure a vaccine developed in 1952 by Dr Jonas Salk gave hope that children could be protected from the disease. In 1961, Albert Sabin pioneered the oral polio vaccine which has been used in most national immunisation programmes around the world.
    In 1996 poliovirus paralysed more than 75,000 children across the continent - every country was affected.
    That year Nelson Mandela launched the "Kick Polio Out of Africa" programme, mobilising millions of health workers who went village-to-village to hand-deliver vaccines.
    It was backed by a coalition of groups including Rotary International which had spearheaded the polio vaccination drive from the 1980s.
    Since 1996 billions of oral polio vaccines have been provided, averting an estimated 1.8 million cases of wild poliovirus.
    What are vaccines and how do they work?
    What have the challenges been?
    The last communities at risk of polio live in some of the most complicated places to deliver immunisation campaigns.
    Nigeria is the last country in Africa to have reported a case of wild polio - in Borno state in Nigeria's remote north-east, and the epicentre of the Boko Haram insurrection, in 2016.
    At the time it was a frustrating set-back as the country had made huge progress and had gone two years without any cases being identified.

  21. #21

  22. #22
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com/2020...-tuberculosis/


    By: KDKA-TV News Staff

    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Brentwood Borough School District is reporting that five employees have tested positive for tuberculosis.

    ADVERTISING

    The tests were conducted after the school district and the Allegheny County Health Department learned of an active tuberculosis case in a Brentwood High School student who has been attending school remotely since the start of the academic year.

    Related: Brentwood High School Student Treated For Tuberculosis

    The school district says the student is no longer infectious and has been taking medication to treat the illness. The employees are also not infectious, according to the school district.

    Brentwood Borough School District says it has been working to identify people who have been in close contact with the student through Zoom calls and phone calls. The school district says if a family has not been reached out to by a phone call and email, then they were not in close contact with the affected student.

    More testing will be done on November 16 and November 17.

    “TB investigations begin at the center of a bullseye target,” Superintendent Dr. Amy Burch wrote in a letter to parents. “If a positive test is detected in the center of the bullseye the investigation moves to the next circle on the target to include those with close contact with the person who had a positive TB test. The pattern is repeated until no positive TB tests are identified.”

    Another Zoom information session will be held at 3:30 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 9 with another one to be scheduled after the school district learns of the results of students’ tuberculosis tests.

    Brentwood Borough School District says that tuberculosis is rare and treatable with antibiotics, and it has consistent symptoms including a cough of longer than three weeks, unexplained weight loss, night sweats, chills, fever and coughing up blood.

    “As to cases involving specific individuals, please understand that while the District and ACHD are attempting to resolve this matter, students and employee privacy must be respected,” Superintendent Dr. Amy Burch wrote. “The District will take all action to protect public health, but the privacy rights of those impacted will be maintained.”

    The school district advised those with questions about testing and tuberculosis to contact the Allegheny County Health Department Pulmonary Center at 412-578-8162.

  23. #23

  24. #24
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://ktla.com/news/nationworld/my...india-reports/

    At least one person has died and 200 others have been hospitalized due to an unidentified illness in the southern Indian state of Andhra Pradesh, reports said Monday.

    The illness was detected Saturday evening in Eluru, an ancient city famous for its hand-woven products. Since then, patients have experienced symptoms ranging from nausea and anxiety to loss of consciousness, doctors said.

    A 45-year-old man who was hospitalized with symptoms similar to epilepsy and nausea died Sunday evening, the Press Trust of India news agency reported.

    Officials are trying to determine the cause of the illness. So far, water samples from impacted areas haven’t shown any signs of contamination, and the chief minister’s office said people not linked to the municipal water supply have also fallen ill. The patients are of different ages and have tested negative for COVID-19 and other viral diseases such as dengue, chikungunya or herpes.

    An expert team deputed by the federal government reached the city to investigate the sudden illness Monday.

    State chief minister Y.S. Jagan Mohan Reddy visited a government hospital and met patients who were ill. Opposition leader N. Chandrababu Naidu demanded on Twitter an “impartial, full-fledged inquiry into the incident.”

    Andhra Pradesh state is among those worst hit by COVID-19, with over 800,000 detected cases. The health system in the state, like the rest of India, has been frayed by the virus.

    A 45-year-old man who was hospitalized with symptoms similar to epilepsy and nausea died Sunday evening, the Press Trust of India news agency reported.

    Officials are trying to determine the cause of the illness. So far, water samples from impacted areas haven’t shown any signs of contamination, and the chief minister’s office said people not linked to the municipal water supply have also fallen ill. The patients are of different ages and have tested negative for COVID-19 and other viral diseases such as dengue, chikungunya or herpes.

    An expert team deputed by the federal government reached the city to investigate the sudden illness Monday.

    State chief minister Y.S. Jagan Mohan Reddy visited a government hospital and met patients who were ill. Opposition leader N. Chandrababu Naidu demanded on Twitter an “impartial, full-fledged inquiry into the incident.”

    Andhra Pradesh state is among those worst hit by COVID-19, with over 800,000 detected cases. The health system in the state, like the rest of India, has been frayed by the virus.
    Folks we are going to have a New pandemic leading into 2021.

  25. #25
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnLanders View Post
    https://ktla.com/news/nationworld/my...india-reports/



    Folks we are going to have a New pandemic leading into 2021.
    I saw this story earlier and thought the same thing. I'm hoping it was just something like a large batch of food poisoning.

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