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Thread: Has anybody deleted Social Media Accounts permanently IE Facebook, Tik Tok, Twitter, Discord, Snapchat, Myspace, Instagram and how did that work out for you in the long term?

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    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    Question Has anybody deleted Social Media Accounts permanently IE Facebook, Tik Tok, Twitter, Discord, Snapchat, Myspace, Instagram and how did that work out for you in the long term?









    I deleted my facebook account permanently when I found out that Anti-Vaxxers were invading my topic of Cell Biology and selling snake oil in my venue last year when I took the decision to delete my account. Note I had to delete my account sooner than I planned to I was originally going to leave after the 2020 elections but that ended up sounding like broken New Years promises If I did it on New Years Week or on Election Day.

    What Motivated me to learn the effects of leaving Social Media permanently was to watch Cal Newport talk about the addictive effects of Facebook and Twitter. I am glad I did. Note as seen here I am facing a relapse due to the recent Police Brutality fallout posts here and family members telling me conspiracies on Cleaner and COVID-19 in their text messages. But I am gaining my soul back.

    https://www.calnewport.com/blog/2020...and-character/

  2. #2
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    The only reason I have a FB account is to look up profiles for articles on MDS. When I find them I rarely read what is on them, I just post them and if something interesting is on them I know that the other MDS people will find it.

    I used my fake FB last year to find a rescue dog and do some networking for the rescues, but I have stopped going onto my FB. I don't want to see all the nonsense; I don't think it is healthy for anyone.

    I think social media has some positive sides (the dog rescues tell me it has been a godsend for them), but I think overall it's kind of a blight on society. I think for people with mental health issues it is like an amplifier. I wish we had never invented it.

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    Senior Member Angiebla's Avatar
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    I think I'm the only mom on the planet who doesn't post pictures on social media of her kid. I just feel weird putting pics of him out there, even though he's super cute and I would like to share.

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

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    Senior Member of_corpse_not's Avatar
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    Deleted Fb a long time ago and it?s been SO freeing and better for my mental health. If you have hundreds of friends on there, you?re taking on all their problems and stress(the ones that post about it) It?s too much.

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    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/dig...ort/1129616011

    Here are sources Cal Newport cites in his book for Digital Minimalism.

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    Senior Member KimTisha's Avatar
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    The Cal Newport video was really good.

    I only have a FB account. I use it because I come from a huge family, we live far away, and we travel a lot so it's an easy way to keep up with the siblings and niblings (nieces and nephews), and for them to keep up with us.

    I rarely post on FB (8x in the past 18 months) and my page is public. I disappear for weeks and months at a time and I don't miss it when I do, so I don't think I have the addiction problem that all of these speakers talk about. Maybe I have a dopamine deficiency.

    I do think social media is unhealthy in many ways, but the second video (the woman) hit the nail on the head with that one. The problem isn't social media, it's how we feel about ourselves and our own life. If you're the type to feel resentful that your friend went to the Caribbean or your cousin got engaged at Christmas, you should probably stay away. Same for people with obsessions/compulsions triggered by SM posts. I took the advice of a magazine article, and spent about 2-3 hours managing my FB contacts into groups, and letting FB know what I did and did not want to see on my page: Politics and animal cruelty - no; Family photos and cat videos - absolutely! It takes time, but it really helps tailor your FB newsfeed to information you want to see. If I can find that article, I'll post it here.
    You are talking to a woman who has laughed in the face of death, sneered at doom and chuckled at catastrophe.
    ...Collector of Chairs. Reader of Books. Hater of Nutmeg...

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    Senior Member puzzld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimTisha View Post
    The Cal Newport video was really good.

    I only have a FB account. I use it because I come from a huge family, we live far away, and we travel a lot so it's an easy way to keep up with the siblings and niblings (nieces and nephews), and for them to keep up with us.
    Ditto. Well except for the travel. I have facebook and I keep in touch with Mom's sibs and their kids and am connected to some of Dad's bunch too. It's a nice low effort way of keeping up with who's doing what. I am quite ruthless with the hiding and unfollowing. Somebody starts singing Trumps praises? Into the cone of silence they go. My liberal aunts and cousins stay unmuted. I don't argue with people even when they are doing truly dumb stuff. Their life they can make stupid mistakes if they like. I usually post a handful of new pictures of Mom or the dogs or the garden every week and may comment and like a couple dozen things. But I'd really miss it if it went away. I'm miss friends who've decided to unplug, although I certainly understand the urge. I just wish they'd "killed the messengers" rather than leaving the platform.
    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    lol at Nestle being some vicious smiter, she's the nicest person on this site besides probably puzzld. Or at least the last person to resort to smiting.
    Quote Originally Posted by nestlequikie View Post
    Why on earth would I smite you when I can ban you?

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    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    I remember there was a time in the early-mid 2000's when Social media and Chat Room leaders main concerns was that their outlet was under investigation was being confronted by Chris Hansen and police because they failed to stop the neighborhood predator from kidnapping women and children at the time. Now the Current Social Media leaders have to confront the issues of politicians yelling conspiracy theories to politicians telling people to take something not approved by their countries version of the FDA to turning over politicians Social Media records for possible corruption allegations. Crazy how things have changed in the past 15-20 years.

    Also I remember when Social Media meant people commenting on skateboarding, surfing and skydiving photos. Yes it was more about marketing their content to people who like the Xgames back in that timeframe. Plus getting college age and High school age people to keep in touch with each other as the initial intentions of Social Media at the time such as Myspace and Facebook.

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    Sana sana colita de rana beli's Avatar
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    I disable my account from time to time because I just need a break from things.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gawna View Post
    Roses are red, violets are blue, seriously where is the fucking ring I gave Julie and ask her mom about the flowers
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    In all fairness, we have no idea how big this dude's cock was.

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    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.madisonfischer.com/madis...-me-the-podium

    Here is a Cool Post by Rock Climber Madison Fischer.

    I grew up at a very unique point in time. I suspect historians will one day describe it as the takeover of social media. Instagram and Facebook defined the formative years of millions of kids looking to grow up in a world ruled by technology. However in December of 2018, I deleted my Instagram and Facebook accounts, and quite honestly think it was this decision that allowed me to attain the biggest achievement of my climbing career to date – the podium at Canadian Open Boulder Nationals.
    History

    I was an early adopter to Instagram. I vividly remember being on the bus in grade 5 when my friend showed me her Instagram account for the first time. I downloaded the app that day and spent the next few months discovering what an online presence was. Cat photos were about all my 10 followers got every week, but when I discovered climbing a few years later, my Instagram became something I really cared about. Now there was something meaningful to post. Now I had a story.

    Projecting videos turned to competition photos turned to a daily output of content. My climbing career progressed and with every incremental step forward, there was my Instagram account following along with me. I developed a sizable little following and spent hours a day scrolling through my feed commenting, liking photos, and exploring. As I thought popularity demanded, I put in place every possible tool to nurture engagement with my account. I had a business profile which allowed me to see statistics on my following. I had a separate phone for social media. I could see what demographics my followers belonged to, when they’re typically online, for how long, and what the ideal time of day is to post. I had a content calendar synced to my Google account to keep me consistent. I put aside days to generate content for later use. I had it dialed.

    Competition posts got the most engagement. I would treat the caption as an opportunity to relay some wisdom to my audience, while subtly throwing in a hint about my placement. People say such nice things after you excel in competitions. They give you validation for looking strong and trying hard. I remember how elated I was when I checked my phone after one competition. @cdnclimbingnews mentioned you in their story! @grippedmagazinecomps commented on your post! 200 likes, 30 comments, 5 mentions, 4 tags, it was the best part of the weekend… I wanted the congratulations. I wanted admiration. I wanted my follower count to grow. I wanted everyone to envy my life and achievements. I wanted, no, needed people to tell me I was going places.

    And in this confession I saw the problem. The problem that didn’t look like a problem. The problem I didn’t want to be a problem. The problem that needed to be addressed.

    I was addicted to social media.

    But you can’t blame me. It’s so easy, so stimulating. It’s not even a statement that you have Instagram, it’s assumed. Everyone’s doing it.

    Props to you, Instagram. You really got me, and the rest of the world for that matter. You allowed me to play celebrity for over a year, and I was unaware of the destruction you were silently perpetrating.

    Identifying the problem meant the floodgate of reality came pouring into the light. I began to take notice of how social media influenced me and my climbing goals. I saw that I was intimidated by training posts from my competitors, it made me doubt my own program. I felt my drive to succeed was the positive-reinforcement, not self-satisfaction or personal growth. I was paranoid about my dynamic follower count. Was there a reason people unfollowed me? I felt as if there was a secondary competition taking place between myself and my competitors over who had the biggest, most popular Instagram profile – and I was losing. I was upset over any dry-spell in post likes or views. I spent too much time on Instagram, even on my own profile, admiring my feed like a wall of trophies. My content was misleading, I’d often post items to my profile claiming they were taken that day when in fact I stockpiled them months prior. I caught myself being exceedingly judgmental of people. I edited pictures beyond recognition. Need I go on?

    Yes. Let’s not dismiss that obvious egotism I was demonstrating. I cared so much about what everyone thought of me that it became outsourced confidence. I told the story of Madison in the brightest light possible and the reception to this augmented reality was, or course, quite positive. What’s worse is that I started believing this narrative of a girl who goes competition to competition with her head held high, steadily progressing without an end in sight, and living the dream travelling around the world to compete while finding the time for school, work, and a relationship. This story blinded me to the many mistakes I had along the way. I couldn’t step out of the reputation I forged online so I lived in a world of entitlement. Pride in my accomplishments made me content, and contentedness is poison to a young athlete who has to stay hungry if she wants to stay competitive.

    Recovery

    I knew something had to change. Admitting there was a problem wasn’t enough for me. It couldn’t be. So for the next six months, I phased out Instagram and Facebook until one day last December when I finally clicked, “Delete account”.

    My first move was simply unfollowing people I knew would produce content that would hinder my mentality for the day. These were competitors and accounts that would post about them. This worked well for a while, until I found myself on the Explore page, and there they were again. And so, I deleted the app. Instagram was still installed on my social media phone so not having it on my everyday phone meant I was on it less but could still post. This may seem like a huge step forward, but it was really just a hoop to jump through because I cheated. A lot. Whether it was by googling “Instagram” and scrolling on the online version, re-downloading the app, or going onto my social media phone without the intention of posting, I was still constantly on Instagram. But you have to understand, I needed to check in on Instagram. Maybe someone commented something. Maybe I got a direct message.

    Maybe there was something useless to look at. Maybe I needed to indulge my ego. Maybe I wanted to keep sabotaging myself. That’s definitely worth it.

    So I tried something new. In September, I went to the profile of each account I was following and muted their posts and stories. This meant my feed was nothing but a white screen. Not seeing the people I was following transformed the app experience. I compare it to the act of buying something with a card opposed to cash. With cash, you see your money depleting, you feel the loss of funds. However with a card, it’s easy to be detached and spend money without even noticing it’s depletion. With money, this can be a drawback, but with social media I’m all for it. I didn’t see the impact of contributions when it felt like no one was there. I just posted. It was so easy to get the job done without playing too hard into my ego or getting caught battling for popularity because it was just me on Instagram.

    At this point, as detached as I was from the app, I still felt chained to it. I had to post. I felt obligated to stay social for my sponsors, but at least the enjoyment was fading. As more and more time elapsed between my last check ins on Instagram, I felt more apathetic towards everything. My routine of posting became a chore – consistency was the only thing that kept me looking active. Comments were flattering, but monotonous, and my dispassion began to come through in my captions.

    The last ties I had to Instagram were my sponsors. I thought I needed to be online for them. I thought I needed to continue indulging my ego with every tedious post and wear hashtags at the end of each caption like badges of honour. I thought the only way to stay relevant, stay supported, was to stay online. But then a friend of mine forwarded me an email by Cal Newport “On Bryce Harper and the Impact of Social Media on Athletes”. One line particularly caught my attention:

    “At the elite level, athletes differentiate themselves by maximizing every physical and cognitive advantage”

    If ‘elite athlete’ was a label I hoped to categorize myself under, then why the hell was I letting social media hold me back? Was I not willing to do everything it takes to achieve my highest potential in this sport? That thought didn’t sit right with me. With that reading, I realized I was ready to differentiate myself. Social media is a hindrance, and doing something in this sport requires pulling out all the stops and implementing everything in my power to achieve my goals. In Ben Bergeron’s Chasing Excellence, this idea is highlighted. Bergeron asks any athletes looking to achieve such a status to pose this question to themselves:

  11. #11
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.madisonfischer.com/madis...-me-the-podium

    Here is a Cool Post by Rock Climber Madison Fischer.

    I grew up at a very unique point in time. I suspect historians will one day describe it as the takeover of social media. Instagram and Facebook defined the formative years of millions of kids looking to grow up in a world ruled by technology. However in December of 2018, I deleted my Instagram and Facebook accounts, and quite honestly think it was this decision that allowed me to attain the biggest achievement of my climbing career to date ? the podium at Canadian Open Boulder Nationals.
    History

    I was an early adopter to Instagram. I vividly remember being on the bus in grade 5 when my friend showed me her Instagram account for the first time. I downloaded the app that day and spent the next few months discovering what an online presence was. Cat photos were about all my 10 followers got every week, but when I discovered climbing a few years later, my Instagram became something I really cared about. Now there was something meaningful to post. Now I had a story.

    Projecting videos turned to competition photos turned to a daily output of content. My climbing career progressed and with every incremental step forward, there was my Instagram account following along with me. I developed a sizable little following and spent hours a day scrolling through my feed commenting, liking photos, and exploring. As I thought popularity demanded, I put in place every possible tool to nurture engagement with my account. I had a business profile which allowed me to see statistics on my following. I had a separate phone for social media. I could see what demographics my followers belonged to, when they?re typically online, for how long, and what the ideal time of day is to post. I had a content calendar synced to my Google account to keep me consistent. I put aside days to generate content for later use. I had it dialed.

    Competition posts got the most engagement. I would treat the caption as an opportunity to relay some wisdom to my audience, while subtly throwing in a hint about my placement. People say such nice things after you excel in competitions. They give you validation for looking strong and trying hard. I remember how elated I was when I checked my phone after one competition. @cdnclimbingnews mentioned you in their story! @grippedmagazinecomps commented on your post! 200 likes, 30 comments, 5 mentions, 4 tags, it was the best part of the weekend? I wanted the congratulations. I wanted admiration. I wanted my follower count to grow. I wanted everyone to envy my life and achievements. I wanted, no, needed people to tell me I was going places.

    And in this confession I saw the problem. The problem that didn?t look like a problem. The problem I didn?t want to be a problem. The problem that needed to be addressed.

    I was addicted to social media.

    But you can?t blame me. It?s so easy, so stimulating. It?s not even a statement that you have Instagram, it?s assumed. Everyone?s doing it.

    Props to you, Instagram. You really got me, and the rest of the world for that matter. You allowed me to play celebrity for over a year, and I was unaware of the destruction you were silently perpetrating.

    Identifying the problem meant the floodgate of reality came pouring into the light. I began to take notice of how social media influenced me and my climbing goals. I saw that I was intimidated by training posts from my competitors, it made me doubt my own program. I felt my drive to succeed was the positive-reinforcement, not self-satisfaction or personal growth. I was paranoid about my dynamic follower count. Was there a reason people unfollowed me? I felt as if there was a secondary competition taking place between myself and my competitors over who had the biggest, most popular Instagram profile ? and I was losing. I was upset over any dry-spell in post likes or views. I spent too much time on Instagram, even on my own profile, admiring my feed like a wall of trophies. My content was misleading, I?d often post items to my profile claiming they were taken that day when in fact I stockpiled them months prior. I caught myself being exceedingly judgmental of people. I edited pictures beyond recognition. Need I go on?

    Yes. Let?s not dismiss that obvious egotism I was demonstrating. I cared so much about what everyone thought of me that it became outsourced confidence. I told the story of Madison in the brightest light possible and the reception to this augmented reality was, or course, quite positive. What?s worse is that I started believing this narrative of a girl who goes competition to competition with her head held high, steadily progressing without an end in sight, and living the dream travelling around the world to compete while finding the time for school, work, and a relationship. This story blinded me to the many mistakes I had along the way. I couldn?t step out of the reputation I forged online so I lived in a world of entitlement. Pride in my accomplishments made me content, and contentedness is poison to a young athlete who has to stay hungry if she wants to stay competitive.

    Recovery

    I knew something had to change. Admitting there was a problem wasn?t enough for me. It couldn?t be. So for the next six months, I phased out Instagram and Facebook until one day last December when I finally clicked, ?Delete account?.

    My first move was simply unfollowing people I knew would produce content that would hinder my mentality for the day. These were competitors and accounts that would post about them. This worked well for a while, until I found myself on the Explore page, and there they were again. And so, I deleted the app. Instagram was still installed on my social media phone so not having it on my everyday phone meant I was on it less but could still post. This may seem like a huge step forward, but it was really just a hoop to jump through because I cheated. A lot. Whether it was by googling ?Instagram? and scrolling on the online version, re-downloading the app, or going onto my social media phone without the intention of posting, I was still constantly on Instagram. But you have to understand, I needed to check in on Instagram. Maybe someone commented something. Maybe I got a direct message.

    Maybe there was something useless to look at. Maybe I needed to indulge my ego. Maybe I wanted to keep sabotaging myself. That?s definitely worth it.

    So I tried something new. In September, I went to the profile of each account I was following and muted their posts and stories. This meant my feed was nothing but a white screen. Not seeing the people I was following transformed the app experience. I compare it to the act of buying something with a card opposed to cash. With cash, you see your money depleting, you feel the loss of funds. However with a card, it?s easy to be detached and spend money without even noticing it?s depletion. With money, this can be a drawback, but with social media I?m all for it. I didn?t see the impact of contributions when it felt like no one was there. I just posted. It was so easy to get the job done without playing too hard into my ego or getting caught battling for popularity because it was just me on Instagram.

    At this point, as detached as I was from the app, I still felt chained to it. I had to post. I felt obligated to stay social for my sponsors, but at least the enjoyment was fading. As more and more time elapsed between my last check ins on Instagram, I felt more apathetic towards everything. My routine of posting became a chore ? consistency was the only thing that kept me looking active. Comments were flattering, but monotonous, and my dispassion began to come through in my captions.

    The last ties I had to Instagram were my sponsors. I thought I needed to be online for them. I thought I needed to continue indulging my ego with every tedious post and wear hashtags at the end of each caption like badges of honour. I thought the only way to stay relevant, stay supported, was to stay online. But then a friend of mine forwarded me an email by Cal Newport ?On Bryce Harper and the Impact of Social Media on Athletes?. One line particularly caught my attention:

    ?At the elite level, athletes differentiate themselves by maximizing every physical and cognitive advantage?

    If ?elite athlete? was a label I hoped to categorize myself under, then why the hell was I letting social media hold me back? Was I not willing to do everything it takes to achieve my highest potential in this sport? That thought didn?t sit right with me. With that reading, I realized I was ready to differentiate myself. Social media is a hindrance, and doing something in this sport requires pulling out all the stops and implementing everything in my power to achieve my goals. In Ben Bergeron?s Chasing Excellence, this idea is highlighted. Bergeron asks any athletes looking to achieve such a status to pose this question to themselves:

  12. #12
    Senior Member KimTisha's Avatar
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    Madison presents a compelling argument for eliminating social media.
    You are talking to a woman who has laughed in the face of death, sneered at doom and chuckled at catastrophe.
    ...Collector of Chairs. Reader of Books. Hater of Nutmeg...

  13. #13
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    I never get a chance to delete facebook bcz facebook keeps deleting my acct. lol. So far they've deleted me 4 times. The 5th coming soon I'm sure, each month they restrict my access.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Angiebla's Avatar
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    I would but im never on fb. It gives me anxiety idk why. Im weird.

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    I would but im never on fb. It gives me anxiety idk why. Im weird.
    Youre not weird lots of people dont have or use facebook

  16. #16
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S281Saleen160 View Post
    I never get a chance to delete facebook bcz facebook keeps deleting my acct. lol. So far they've deleted me 4 times. The 5th coming soon I'm sure, each month they restrict my access.
    Just delete your Facebook permanently! After the ban is lifted.

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