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Thread: Breonna Taylor (26) was shot and killed by police when they executed a "no-knock" search warrant on the wrong house

  1. #26
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://ktla.com/news/nationworld/op...ss-louisville/

    First, Oprah Winfrey put Breonna Taylor on the cover of O, The Oprah Magazine. Now the media mogul is spreading her message with billboards demanding justice for the Kentucky woman shot to death during a police raid.

    Twenty-six billboards displaying a portrait of Taylor are going up across Louisville, Kentucky, demanding that the police officers involved in her death be arrested and charged, according to social justice organization Until Freedom. That’s one billboard for every year of the Black woman’s life.

    The billboards, funded by the magazine, showcase the magazine cover dedicated to Taylor, the Courier Journal reported. Also displayed is a quote from Winfrey: “If you turn a blind eye to racism, you become an accomplice to it.”

    Until Freedom thanked the Oprah magazine for its work on the billboards.

    “Together, we will make sure no one forgets #BreonnaTaylor’s name and recommit to the fight for justice for her and her family,” the group said in a tweet.

    Taylor, an emergency medical tech studying to become a nurse, was shot multiple times March 13 when police officers burst into her Louisville apartment using a no-knock warrant during a narcotics investigation. The warrant to search her home was in connection with a suspect who did not live there and no drugs were found.

    Kenneth Walker, Taylor’s boyfriend, was originally charged with attempted murder after he fired a shot at one of the officers who came into the home. Walker has said he didn’t know who was entering the apartment and was firing a warning shot. The charge was later dropped.

    Global protests on behalf of Taylor, George Floyd in Minnesota and others have been part of a national reckoning over racism and police brutality. Tensions have swelled in Taylor’s hometown and beyond as activists, professional athletes and social media stars push for action while investigators plead for more patience.

    The decision whether to bring state-level criminal charges against the Louisville officers rests with Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron. He took the Taylor case after a local prosecutor recused himself from reviewing the matter. One of the officers has been terminated and two other officers are on administrative reassignment.

    Cameron, the first African American elected to the attorney general’s job in Kentucky, has declined to put a timetable on his decision since taking over the case in May.

    “We remain committed to an independent and thorough investigation into the death of Ms. Breonna Taylor,” Cameron said Friday on his official Twitter account.

    “The investigation remains ongoing, and we currently await additional testing and analysis from federal partners, including a ballistics test from the FBI crime lab,” the tweet said.

    The FBI field office in Louisville said Friday that a “significant amount of ballistic evidence” was collected when investigators returned to Taylor’s apartment in June.

    “This evidence is being tested and analyzed at the FBI Laboratory in Quantico, Virginia,” the FBI’s Louisville office said in a statement. “Once the FBI Laboratory has completed its findings, FBI Louisville will promptly share our results with the attorney general’s office.”

    Christopher 2X, an anti-violence activist in Louisville, told reporters this week that he’s encouraged by the commitment that FBI officials locally and nationally have shown to the case. He commented after participating in a meeting at the FBI’s Louisville office.

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    https://ktla.com/news/nationworld/pr...e-experts-say/

    Here is an update in the Breonna Taylor fallout

    Despite mounting public pressure to file criminal charges nearly five months after Breonna Taylor’s death, prosecutors may face significant obstacles to bringing homicide-related charges against police officers who were shot at when sent to her house with a warrant, legal experts said.

    Tensions have swelled in her home town and spread far afield as activists, professional athletes and social media stars push for action while investigators plead for more patience. The warrant also has been called into question and, with federal officials looking into potential civil rights abuses, the case could reach beyond the officers on the scene that night.

    Taylor, a 26-year-old Louisville emergency medical tech studying to become a nurse, was shot multiple times March 13 after being roused from sleep by police at her door. The warrant was approved as part of a narcotics investigation into a suspect who lived across town, and no drugs were found at her home.

    Attorney General Daniel Cameron, the first African American elected to the job in Kentucky, has declined to put a timetable on his decision since taking over the case in May.

    “It’s a tough issue. He has to figure out whether there’s probable cause to believe that there was an unreasonable use of force” by the officers, said Christopher Slobogin, director of the criminal justice program at Vanderbilt University. Slobogin said attorneys for the officers would certainly raise the warrant as a defense in a criminal case.

    Cameron has seen increasing pressure from protesters in recent weeks. Dozens of activists who went to his Louisville home were arrested after they wouldn’t leave his yard, and last week, an armed militia marched into downtown and demanded that Cameron make his decision within a month. Taylor’s family and multiple cultural luminaries — from LeBron James to Oprah Winfrey — have called for three police officers who were at her home to be charged with her killing. Oprah put Taylor on the cover of her O magazine this month.

    Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenny Walker, was with her at the apartment and fired a shot at Louisville police Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly after the door was broken down. Mattingly was struck in the leg and returned fire, along with other officers who were outside the apartment.

    Taylor, unarmed, was shot several times in her hallway and died on the scene. The officers on the scene were not wearing body cameras and the department has said there is no video of the raid.

    The warrant they were carrying has come under scrutiny, and the police lieutenant who sought it, Joshua Jaynes, has been placed on administrative leave during the investigation. Attorneys for Taylor’s family said it was based on erroneous information that a drug dealer was sending packages to Taylor’s apartment.

    The FBI is investigating the case for civil rights violations, and agents at its state-of-the-art crime lab in Quantico, Virginia, are examining evidence.

    Walker told police investigators he heard knocking but didn’t know who was at the door. Police had secured a controversial no-knock warrant that allows for sudden entry, but Mattingly insisted to investigators they knocked and announced themselves before entering.

    Louisville has since banned no-knock warrants in a local ordinance named for Taylor.

    Slobogin and other experts noted that it may be challenging for prosecutors to push for charges against police officers who were shot at, prompting them to fire back.

    The warrant, “combined with the fact that they were fired upon, would make for a powerful defense argument that they acted in valid self-defense while conducting a lawful police operation,” said Sam Marcosson, a University of Louisville law professor who has closely watched the local case.

    Marcosson and Slobogin said if the warrant were proven to be obtained fraudulently, the officers would have had to be aware of that, another difficult legal hurdle.

    Police department protocol allows the use of lethal force when officers feel threatened, giving some measure of latitude to their judgment at the time.

    But the warrant does not necessarily immunize the police, Slobogin said. Even if they had a valid no-knock warrant and properly announced themselves, “blazing away, the way they did, arguably is an excessive use of force.”

    One of the officers involved, Brett Hankison, was fired in June. A termination letter said the officer violated procedures by showing “extreme indifference to the value of human life” by “wantonly and blindly” shooting 10 rounds into Taylor’s apartment. It’s not yet clear whose bullets struck Taylor. Mattingly and Myles Cosgrove remain on administrative leave.

    Sam Aguiar, an attorney for Taylor’s family who is suing the three officers, said the police shot an innocent person.

    “Breonna did not shoot at them and posed no threat,” Aguiar said in an email to AP. “Mattingly clearly says (in his testimony) he sees a female without a firearm and a male with a firearm. He and the others don’t get a license to keep shooting an unarmed female simply because they are confronted by an armed male.”

    Aguiar said the officers “created the initial threat” and Hankison should be charged with attempted murder for his recklessness.

    Louisville’s top criminal prosecutor, who recused himself from the Taylor investigation, has pointed to the confusion over whether Taylor and Walker knew the police were at the door. Tom Wine dropped an attempted murder charge against Walker in May and has said he believes the police announced themselves at least three times before knocking down the door.

    At a news conference in late May, Wine played sections of testimony from Walker and Mattingly, who said he and the other officers were called in that night for extra manpower in a large-scale drug operation.

    “It’s possible there was no criminal activity on either side of that door because no one could hear what the other party is saying,” Wine said.

    Since Wine made those statements, the city’s police chief has been fired, the FBI’s Louisville office called the case their “top priority” and Taylor’s name has spread to protests against racial injustice around the world.

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    https://www.fox8live.com/2020/08/27/...ed-his-arrest/


    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE) ? Breonna Taylor?s ex-boyfriend, a central figure in her case, is in police custody after warrants were issued for his arrest.

    Jamarcus Glover, 30, was booked into the Louisville Metro Department of Corrections at 11:32 a.m. Thursday, according to jail records.

    Wednesday, Glover?s attorney confirmed he skipped a recent court appearance. A warrant was issued for Glover?s arrest on July 27.


    Glover, who in addition to his 2015 drug trafficking conviction has several pending drug and weapons cases against him, was named on the March 13 warrant that sent officers to Taylor?s apartment. Taylor and a man named Adrian Walker also were named on that warrant.



    Taylor was shot and killed by Louisville Metro Police Department officers who were serving that warrant. The killing has sparked a national outcry demanding police reform and protest on Louisville?s city streets for nearly 100 days.

    On Thursday, Glover was charged with complicity possession of a controlled substance for cocaine and heroin, complicity trafficking in marijuana, complicity tampering with physical evidence, complicity to trafficking cocaine, and no operators/moped license. He is being held on a $50,000 bond.


    The list of drugs related to his previous arrests includes cocaine, heroin, opiates, hallucinogens and marijuana.



    Also Thursday, WAVE 3 News Troubleshooters found out Glover had yet another outstanding warrant for his arrest from the state of Mississippi. That warrant was for violations of conditions of release. Further research found the Mississippi charges included selling cocaine.

    The out-of-state warrant included another note seeking full extradition, meaning at some point he?ll have to return to Mississippi to face those charges there.

    LMDC told WAVE 3 News that Glover will be added to the fugitive docket at the Jefferson District Court, which will be managed by a Commonwealth Attorney Fugitive Detective.

    Glover?s attorney, Scott Barton, previously stated his client was innocent of the charges related to the night of the Taylor shooting.

    Glover is scheduled to be arraigned Friday.

  4. #29
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    https://www.wftv.com/news/trending/l...JPMV4BAV4GEWU/

    Lawyer: Breonna Taylor’s ex was offered plea deal to implicate her in ‘organized crime syndicate’

    The man at the center of a drug investigation that led to the March 13 police killing of Breonna Taylor in her Louisville home was offered a plea deal that would have required him to implicate her in the crimes, an attorney for the Taylor family said.

    Attorney Sam Aguiar on Monday posted an image of the plea agreement on his Facebook page.

    Taylor’s ex-boyfriend, Jamarcus Glover, was the focus of the drug investigation that led Louisville police to execute a no-knock search warrant at the home of Taylor, an EMT and hospital worker. Louisville police Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, Detective Myles Cosgrove and Detective Brett Hankison used a battering ram to break down Taylor’s door, at which point her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, fired a single shot.

    Walker, who told authorities he believed it was a home invasion, shot Mattingly in the leg. The three officers opened fire, unloading more than 20 rounds into Taylor’s apartment and the apartment next door.

    Taylor, who was struck at least five times, died on the floor of her hallway. She and Walker had been asleep when the officers arrived.

    On Tuesday, we were told Breonna Taylor’s ex-boyfriend Jamarcus Glover was offered a plea deal, which would have required him to say that Taylor was part of his drug operation. Just now, the family’s attorney shared a picture of a plea deal that appears to show it is true pic.twitter.com/E9nsWQLKrb
    — Roberto Aram Ferdman (@robferdman) August 31, 2020

    According to the image posted by Aguiar, as well as reporting by multiple media outlets, the proposed plea deal would have Glover acknowledge that over a period leading up to April 22, he and several co-defendants — including Taylor — had “engaged in an organized crime syndicate that trafficked large amounts of crack cocaine, methamphetamine and opiates into the Louisville community.”

    The syndicate sold the drugs out of abandoned or vacant houses on Elliott Avenue in the Russell neighborhood of Louisville, the document alleged. Elliott Avenue is about 10 miles from Taylor’s apartment on Springfield Drive.

    “Read this (expletive),” Aguiar wrote on Facebook. “Commonwealth Attorney Tom Wine tried to give the Elliott Avenue defendants a plea deal on July 13 which would have identified Breonna Taylor as a ‘co-defendant’ for actions related to the arrests on April 22, 2020. Umm ... when was Breonna Taylor ever a co-defendant?”

    Aguiar also pointed out that Taylor was killed more than a month before that April date.

    WDRB reported that Glover, a convicted felon, turned down the plea deal, which could have resulted in him being released on probation instead of serving prison time.

  5. #30
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    https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/15/us/br...ent/index.html

    The city of Louisville, Kentucky, has settled a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the family of Breonna Taylor, the 26-year-old EMT killed by police six months ago.
    A source told CNN on Tuesday the agreement was a multimillion dollar settlement. Taylor family attorney Sam Aguilar also confirmed to CNN there is a settlement in the case.

    "The city's response in this case has been delayed and it's been frustrating, but the fact that they've been willing to sit down and talk significant reform was a step in the right direction and hopefully a turning point," he said.

    Taylor's family sued the city after Louisville Metro Police officers broke down the door to Taylor's apartment and fatally shot her while executing a late-night, "no-knock" warrant in a narcotics investigation on March 13.

    Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer is expected to announce the settlement later Tuesday in a joint press conference with the Taylor family attorneys. Speaking to News Radio 840 WHAS on Tuesday morning, he declined to comment on the settlement, saying, "I don't have anything to announce on that at this time."

    A CNN review of the shooting found that police believed Taylor was home alone when she was in fact accompanied by her boyfriend, who was legally armed. That miscalculation, along with the decision to press forward with a high-risk, forced-entry raid under questionable circumstances, contributed to the deadly outcome.

    Taylor's boyfriend, who said he believed the home was being broken into, shot and injured an officer, and police killed Taylor in the return fire. The officers were not wearing body cameras, police said.

    None of the three officers involved in the flawed raid has been charged with a crime. One officer, Brett Hankinson, was fired in late June for "wantonly and blindly" firing 10 rounds into her apartment, then-interim Louisville Police Chief Robert Schroeder wrote.

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    https://www.wave3.com/2020/09/22/th-...ecision-looms/


    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE) - The city of Louisville is awaiting a grand jury’s decision whether to indict the Louisville Metro police officers involved in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor.

    While the city waits, dozens of businesses downtown have been boarded up and closed, in anticipation of demonstrations after the decision is made public.




    On Fourth Street, it is no different as the sound of drills connecting plywood to brick has become commonplace, as one of the city’s most notable street sits in limbo.

    That feeling is one Don Davis knows well.

    “We’re hoping for an end to everything that’s been going on and we’re hoping that Louisville will become the peaceful place that all of us in Louisville love," Davis said.

    Davis and his wife own JJ Wig Shop. During the first weekend of demonstrations in May, the store was looted, costing Davis thousands of dollars in stolen merchandise. Four months later, the store is closed and fortified, as Davis hopes to avoid damage this time around.

    “It’s been tough to make it through the first time, so I cannot imagine that a business like ours or anybody else who gets looted twice is going to be able to make it," Davis said.



    One block south, though the windows are boarded up, the doors of Safier Mediterranean Deli are still open. Owner Youness Elmesyah and his staff spent Tuesday feeding customers who were still left downtown.
    Barricades placed in downtown Louisville

    “There’s not many places here to be open," Elmesyah said. "A lot of people don’t have anywhere to eat, so we’re open for them as well.”

    Though his restaurant is still open, it doesn’t stop Elmesyah from being nervous about what’s to come. He told WAVE 3 News he slept outside his store in May to prevent it from being looted. This time around, he’s hoping for peace.
    >> FULL COVERAGE: Breonna Taylor case

    “[I’m feeling] mixed,” he said. "[I’m] worried, scared. I want to know what’s next going to happen. I mean, seeing our beautiful downtown getting destroyed, literally destroyed man, is just heartbreaking, very heartbreaking. We just want it to be a one-time thing, so hope it’s a one-time thing, and things go better.”

    Davis told WAVE 3 News he’s hoping for peace too, so he can get back into his wig shop and continue their nearly 50-year-old tradition.

    “We’ve been around for 45 years, so we’ve been a big part of that industry here in Louisville," Davis said. "So we hope to get through all of this at a point where we’re still in business where we can get back to where we were, taking care of our customers here in Louisville.”



    LMPD has made several changes to downtown Louisville in anticipation of the grand jury’s decision, including restricting access to downtown Louisville.

    4th Street Live! is also making changes. A spokesperson told WAVE 3 News Tuesday most businesses in the area are closed, and hours of operation in the days ahead will be determined by the individual businesses.

    Copyright 2020 WAVE 3 News. All rights reserved.






  7. #32
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    https://www.wlky.com/article/no-one-...-lmpd/34128795

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. ?

    After months of waiting, a decision has finally been made in Breonna Taylor's death: No one will be charged in her killing.

    Of the three officers in question, one was indicted, but it was unrelated to her death.
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    The grand jury presented its findings Wednesday afternoon and Attorney General Daniel Cameron explained the decision immediately following.

    He said his job was to decide if those officers criminally violated the law. His office did not investigate claims of civil negligence by the officers, Taylor's boyfriend who fired a shot that night -- Kenneth Walker, the narcotics case against Jamarcus Glover or the obtainment of the search warrant on Taylor's home.

    Ultimately, of the officers who fired shots, Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove were cleared of any wrongdoing and were found justified in shooting. Former officer Brett Hankison was indicted on three counts of wanton endangerment for shots that went into a neighboring apartment that night occupied by a male, pregnant female and child.

    The Shelby County Detention Center confirmed Hankison was booked there Wednesday afternoon and has already posted his $15,000 cash bond.

    Cameron reaffirmed that the lack of body camera footage made the case difficult, so his team had to use ballistic evidence, 911 calls, interviews and radio traffic.

    Read Cameron's full statement here

    Cameron said none of the three officers had known involvement in the investigation prior to the raid. They were called into duty as extra personnel, Cameron said. The only info they had was what was conveyed during the briefing prior to it.

    He says despite the approval of a no-knock warrant, officers did knock and announce, although Walker has said he never heard verbally police identify themselves before using a battering ram to enter the apartment. Cameron said just one civilian who lives at the complex corroborated the claim that they announced themselves.

    Cameron said evidence shows Mattingly, who Cameron said is the only one to enter the apartment, fired six shots, Cosgrove fired 16 and Hankison fired 10, for a total of 32 shots.

    Taylor was struck six times, Cameron said. He also said it is inconclusive whether any of Hankison's shots hit Taylor.

    He said only one of the six wounds appears to be fatal and a medical examiner said it would have killed her within a few seconds to up to two minutes. That shot came from Cosgrove, Cameron said.

    Based on this evidence, Cameron said neither Mattingly nor Cosgrove's actions fit any of the six types of homicides.

    He said he and the grand jury agreed that they were justified in shooting since Walker, admittedly, fired first.

    Cameron said there is no evidence that supports Mattingly was struck by anyone other than Walker.

    Walker has said he believed the plainclothes officers to be intruders. He was arrested immediately following the raid, but charges were eventually dropped with prejudice.

    More on Brett Hankison

    Hankison was fired from Louisville Metro Police Department in June. In his termination letter, it said he violated two standard operating procedures the night Taylor died: obedience to rules and regulations and use of deadly force.

    Then, interim Chief Rob Schroeder said, "Based upon my review, these are extreme violations to our policies. I find your conduct a shock to the conscience."

    Hankison is also under investigation by an FBI-led task force for sexual assault allegations.

    It's unclear if officers Mattingly and Cosgrove will face any punishment from LMPD. They are both being investigated still by the Professional Standards Unit.

    Mayor Greg Fischer said the FBI is still conducting its own investigation, which the Department of Justice will review to determine whether there was any violation of federal laws, including Civil Rights violations.


    Booo! BOOOO! BOOO!



  8. #33
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    https://www.kget.com/national-news/2...in-louisville/

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (NewsNation Now) — At least two police officers were shot in Louisville, Kentucky, MetroSafe confirmed to NewsNation.

    Both were taken to the hospital. Their conditions are currently unknown.
    Watch Live: Protests break out in Louisville, more expected across the country after Breonna Taylor case announcement

    It’s not clear if it happened during the protests and no other details were immediately released.

    The Louisville Metro Police Department livestreamed part of their police response on Facebook.

    “Officer down” and “shots fired” can be heard in the video.

    Warning: the video below may be graphic for some viewers.

    Protests are currently going on in Louisville after all three police officers were cleared of charges in the death of Breonna Taylor. A curfew of 9 p.m. EST is being enforced.

    This story is developing. Refresh for updates.

  9. #34
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    https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/24/us/lo...sts/index.html

    (CNN)Outrage and heartbreak boiled over into protests in cities across the US on Wednesday after news broke that none of the three officers involved in Breonna Taylor's death were charged with her killing.

    More than six months after Taylor was shot to death after Louisville police officers broke down the door to her apartment while executing a warrant, a grand jury decided to indict only one of the three officers involved on first-degree wanton endangerment charges. The charge applies to the risk put on Taylor's neighbors but does not aim to hold the officer responsible for her death.
    From Louisville to Los Angeles, Atlanta and New York, masses of people congregated to protest the decision. Police in Portland declared protests outside the justice center there a riot. And in Seattle, 13 people were arrested after a night of fires and protesters throwing glass bottles and fireworks at police, authorities said.

    "We will go to our graves proclaiming that Breonna Taylor did not get justice from the Kentucky attorney general's office," Taylor family lawyer Ben Crump told CNN on Wednesday.

    Taylor, a 26-year-old Black emergency room technician and aspiring nurse, was described by relatives as a hard-working, goal-oriented young woman who put an emphasis on family. Crump called demonstrations over her death "righteous anger."
    Former Det. Brett Hankison was booked in the Shelby County Jail on Wednesday and later released after posting bond, his attorney told CNN. His bail was set at $15,000, an indictment released earlier said.
    2 officers shot in Louisville protests
    Anticipating unrest, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer signed an executive order setting a countywide 72-hour curfew starting at 9 p.m. Wednesday.
    Shortly before it began, gunfire rang out near one of the marches in Louisville, according to video from the scene and reports.
    Two responding officers were shot and suffered non-life-threatening wounds, Interim Police Chief Robert Schroeder told reporters. A suspect was in custody and one officer was in surgery, he told reporters late Wednesday.

    Police were starting to move forward as three apparent flash bangs were fired into the air toward protesters, a video livestreamed by the Louisville Metro Police Department shows. Nine shots are heard in videos taken by police and Regg Inkagnedo, who also livestreamed the moment.
    "Shots fired, shots fired," a voice is heard saying on the police livestream video. "Officers down ... take cover."
    Shots also are heard on a third video obtained by CNN. The video by CNN affiliate Spectrum News 1 Kentucky reporter Khyati Patel shows officers quickly approaching an ambulance and apparently loading an injured person into it.
    The FBI Louisville office is asking for the public to continue to submit any videos related to the shooting of the officers, according to a post on the FBI's website.
    Meanwhile in Denver, a suspect was detained after a vehicle was driven into a protest Wednesday night, police said. There were no injuries, they said in a tweet.
    At least one person was knocked to the ground in the protest that had been peaceful until the vehicle rammed the crowd, CNN affiliate KCNC reported.
    The deadly raid on Breonna Taylor's home
    The incident that ended Taylor's life began with a narcotics investigation on March 13.
    Hankison, Sgt. John Mattingly and Det. Myles Cosgrove were executing a search warrant on Taylor's home, though her ex-boyfriend was the focus of the narcotics investigation. Her ex-boyfriend was arrested on drug charges last month and told a Kentucky newspaper that she had nothing to do with the probe into an alleged drug trade that spurred the warrant.

    Taylor was sleeping next to her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker III, in the early hours of March 13, when they heard a noise. They both got up and walked to the door.
    "She's yelling at the top of her lungs ? and I am too at this point ? 'who is it?' " recalled Walker, her boyfriend. "No answer. No response. No anything."
    Police forced entry into the home, and Walker said he couldn't see but he fired one shot. After entering, Mattingly was shot in the leg, Attorney General Daniel Cameron said on Wednesday.
    The chaotic police operation that night was exacerbated by Hankison, who was accused by his own department of "blindly" firing 10 bullets into Taylor's apartment from an outdoor patio. Hankison was fired in June, the Louisville police chief said, but he is appealing his termination. His attorney, David Leightty, has declined to comment.
    Cameron argued the officers were "justified in their use of force" because Taylor's boyfriend fired first.

    Charges aren't related to her death
    Hankison was charged with endangering not Taylor's life, but those of the people in the next apartment, Crump said.
    Crump said the decision was an insult to Taylor's family and an outrage to the community.
    "The fact that you're going to charge for bullets going into an apartment but not for bullets going into Breonna Taylor's body is outrageous," Crump told CNN's Don Lemon Wednesday. "There are two justice systems in America: one for Black America, one for White America."
    Opinion: Indictment doesn't even begin to bring justice for Breonna Taylor
    Opinion: Indictment doesn't even begin to bring justice for Breonna Taylor
    First-degree wanton endangerment is a Class D felony, the lowest of four classes of felonies. The maximum sentence is five years; the minimum is one year.
    The NAACP said in a statement that the justice system "failed" Taylor and the charges against one officer do "not go far enough."
    "The decision before my office is not to decide if the loss of Breonna Taylor's life was a tragedy," said Cameron, the first Black person to hold the post and a rising Republican star. "The answer to that question is unequivocally yes."
    Cameron called the Taylor's death "a gut-wrenching emotional case." He defended the length of the investigation, saying the time reflected "how important it was to get this right."
    "I certainly understand the pain that has been brought about by the tragic loss of Ms. Taylor. I understand that as an attorney general who is responsible for all 120 counties, in terms of being the chief legal officer -- the chief law enforcement officer, I understand that. I understand that as a Black man -- how painful this is, which is why it was so incredibly important to make sure that we did everything we possibly could to uncover every fact."

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    https://ktla.com/news/nationworld/vi...emonstrations/

    Seattle police say an officer has been placed on leave and a use of force investigation is underway after video surfaced on social media allegedly showing a bicycle officer riding over the head of a fallen demonstrator during protests Wednesday night.

    In a statement, the department said it was aware of a video circulating that “apparently shows an SPD bike officer’s bike rolling over the head of an individual laying in the street.”

    Protests broke out across the nation Wednesday after a Kentucky grand jury considering the March killing of Breonna Taylor in her home voted not to indict any of the three officers involved with charges directly related to her death. One of the three officers was indicted on a charge related to endangering Taylor’s neighbors.

    1 officer indicted in Breonna Taylor case; not for her death
    Police arrested 13 people in Seattle as authorities said people smashed windows and spray painted buildings as protesters marched through parts of the city. Police said multiple officers were injured and one was struck in the head with a baseball bat, cracking his helmet.

    Seattle has been one of many cities to experience weeks of widespread demonstrations this summer in the wake of the killing of George Floyd and the related resurgence of the Black Lives Matter movement.

    In a news release detailing the officer’s suspension, the police department painted a chaotic picture of the protests Wednesday.

    “Individuals were responsible for attacking a business in the area, launching an incendiary device into the East Precinct nearly hitting officers, throwing rocks and bottles at officers, setting multiple fires, and violently striking an SPD officer in the head with a metal baseball bat,” SPD officers wrote, indicating that the department had made a dozen arrests.

    In the video, officers can be seen clearing a street in the city’s vibrant Capitol Hill neighborhood. Warning, some may find the video disturbing:

    Seattle police have not identified the officer involved and the Seattle Times reports that individual will be on paid leave during an investigation by an outside agency, the King County Sheriff’s Office.

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    https://ktla.com/news/california/mul...akland-police/

    Police in Oakland say objects were thrown at officers and road barricades were placed in front of them during a protest late Friday.

    The department says on Twitter that “minimal smoke” was deployed into the crowd of about 250 demonstrators.

    Multiple people were arrested and accused of assaulting officers, police said.

    Protests have erupted across the country over the decision to not directly charge police officers in Louisville, Kentucky, for killing Breonna Taylor.
    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/tru...ast-1-injured/

    At least one person was injured after two vehicles plowed through a crowd of demonstrators in Hollywood, where 300 protesters were demanding justice for Breonna Taylor.

    Sky5 was overhead as a Ford pickup truck drove by a large group of people walking down the 6500 block of Sunset Boulevard between Seward Street and Schrader Boulevard at 8:54 p.m.

    The driver can then be seen striking at least one person. Then crowds start hitting the vehicle and running after it.

    “Shortly after 9:00 pm a blue pick-up truck traveling on Sunset maneuvered through the crowd and become involved in an altercation,” the Los Angeles Police Department said in a written statement. “As the driver attempted to get away from the situation, he struck a protestor standing in the street.”

    The vehicle continued driving, and a green convertible Mustang could be seen following it for some time until police caught up.

    At least one person was injured after a truck plowed through a crowd of demonstrators in Hollywood, protesting the killing of Breonna Taylor on Sept. 24, 2020. (KTLA)
    At least one person was injured after a truck plowed through a crowd of demonstrators in Hollywood, protesting the killing of Breonna Taylor on Sept. 24, 2020. (KTLA)
    The driver eventually pulled over about three minutes later, exiting the vehicle and surrendering to police. The man was taken into custody moments later.

    One person was taken to a local hospital in an ambulance, according to Los Angeles Fire Department spokesperson Nicholas Prange. The individual had minor injuries, police said.

    Around 9:30 p.m., a white Prius also drove through a crowd of demonstrators near Sunset and Cahuenga boulevards and then sped off.

    RELATED CONTENT
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    Another black pick-up truck pulled up in front of the Prius, stopping it in its tracks.

    Someone got out of the truck and went up to the Prius’ window, reaching in and trying to get the driver to stop. The Prius managed to backup but hit another car behind it — which appeared to be the same Mustang that followed the first truck.

    The Prius managed to get away but the driver was detained several blocks away, police said.

    Both vehicles that pinned the Prius were participating in the protest, officials said.

    There were no injuries associated with the second incident, according to LAPD.

    Prange said LAFD paramedics were not called to any other incidents involving the protest Thursday night.

    “All of the drivers and victims involved in both altercations have been identified by Hollywood Officers and the investigation is continuing,” the department said.

    Demonstrators had gathered at Hollywood Forever Cemetery starting at 7 p.m. to decry Wednesday’s decision not to prosecute Kentucky police officers for killing Taylor.

  12. #37
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    About these people who think its ok to stand/sit/lay down in front of vehicles.......run them the fuck over!

  13. #38
    Senior Member KimTisha's Avatar
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    I've seen the videos of cars being surrounded by an angry mob. I'm afraid I'd plow right through them too. You're not going to drag me out of the car and beat me to death because I made the mistake of turning down that street.
    You are talking to a woman who has laughed in the face of death, sneered at doom and chuckled at catastrophe.
    ...Collector of Chairs. Reader of Books. Hater of Nutmeg...

  14. #39
    Senior Member Angiebla's Avatar
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    I want to know how you can be hit by a truck but only have minor injuries. The truck must have been going 2 miles an hour.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimTisha View Post
    I've seen the videos of cars being surrounded by an angry mob. I'm afraid I'd plow right through them too. You're not going to drag me out of the car and beat me to death because I made the mistake of turning down that street.
    Yeahhhhh..... But why do these people drive right towards the protests? If I see a protest happening, I go the other way. I don't insist on still driving through it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

  16. #41
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    As someone who owns a gun and believes in the right to protect myself in my home, I have to ask where is the NRA and the gun rights people on this? They should be pushing for nothing to happen to the boyfriend (who had a legal gun and was defending himself against unmarked people with guns who burst into his home without announcing themselves). Why is this not happening? This tells me everything I need to know about this case.

    The cops made a mistake on all of their evidence, and then they went no knock and then lied and said they did knock, and then admitted they didn't knock and then lied again and said they did. If some shadowy figure shows up in my bedroom in the middle of the night in non-marked clothes and brandishing a gun, I'm gonna get my gun too, and the NRA and most laws say I have every right to...if I am white I guess.

    Plus, the NRA should have been backing charges against these cops from the first day.

  17. #42
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Well, well, well....

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/ba...id=mailsignout

    Ballistics report doesn't support Kentucky AG's claim that Breonna Taylor's boyfriend shot cop

    A Kentucky State Police ballistics report does not support state Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s assertion that Breonna Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, shot a police officer the night she was killed.

    Cameron said Wednesday the investigation of Taylor’s death March 13 ruled out “friendly fire” from officer Brett Hankison as the source of the shot that went through Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly’s thigh, prompting him and officer Myles Cosgrove to return fire, killing Taylor.

    The KSP report says that “due to limited markings of comparative value,” the 9mm bullet that hit and exited Mattingly was neither “identified nor eliminated as having been fired” from Walker’s gun.

    Cameron said Hankison had been eliminated as the shooter because the three officers carried .40-caliber handguns, while Walker had a 9.

    Wednesday night on CNN, Steven Romines, one of Walker’s attorneys, said he obtained a Louisville Metro Police Department record showing Hankison had been issued a 9mm weapon as well.


    Romines declined to share the record from Hankison’s personnel file with The Louisville Courier Journal, and LMPD spokeswoman Jessie Halladay said she could release it only in response to an open records request.

    The Courier Journal, part of the USA TODAY Network, filed one, but the department hasn’t responded.

    Another attorney for Walker, Rob Eggert, provided the ballistic report, which was first reported by Vice.

    Walker said he fired a single warning shot from his Glock handgun at Taylor’s apartment because he thought intruders were breaking in. Police said they had identified themselves. They were attempting to serve a "no-knock" search warrant shortly before 1 a.m. March 13 at Taylor's home as part of a narcotics investigation.

    Cameron announced Mattingly and Cosgrove were not charged with any crime because they had a right to defend themselves. Hankison, who was fired in June, was charged with three counts of wantonly endangering Taylor’s neighbors by firing shots that entered their apartment.

    He was not charged with endangering Taylor.

    Cameron declined to explain that discrepancy or respond to 13 other questions about the case submitted by The Courier Journal. His spokeswoman said Saturday that the office was not scheduling interviews and couldn’t talk about the grand jury proceedings because of secrecy rules governing them.

    Cameron said last week that Mattingly fired six shots, Cosgrove 16 and Hankison 10, and Taylor was hit six times.

    He said FBI ballistic examiners concluded Cosgrove fired the shot that killed Taylor, but KSP couldn't determine whether Cosgrove or Mattingly fired that bullet.

    The shot hit Taylor's pulmonary artery, killing her within minutes.

    The city of Louisville paid $12 million to settle a wrongful death suit filed by Taylor’s estate and agreed to make numerous changes in Police Department policies and procedures.

  18. #43
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Long, so I'm just going to link...but this speaks volumes to me

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime...id=mailsignout

    Police told former chief that Breonna Taylor had a rifle and fired at officers. She didn't

  19. #44
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Bunch of fucking liars. This is outrageous!
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

  20. #45
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    I saw multiple stories this weekend about the Trump parades stopping traffic on major roadways.. I would be absolutely terrified if I got caught up in those, you know most of those people are hopped up and all carrying guns, and acting irrationally with their Trump riots since he is losing. So would it be ok to run over them to get out of danger when they are stopping traffic, like it was insinuated that was ok above when it came to BLM people blocking roads? Asking for a friend.

    (I would never run over anyone in this situation, but I wanted to point out the hypocrisy of the Trump people doing this after all the stuff they have shouted about the protests and all the violence they have inflicted on protesters because they say they are blocking roads.)

    ETA links because I am sure someone is going to say that the Trump parade wasn't doing anything wrong and didn't block traffic:

    https://apnews.com/article/donald-tr...3e0592949df308

    https://www.wctrib.com/news/governme...vehicle-parade

    Critics are questioning the police response to an unpermitted parade in support of President Donald Trump through the heart of Omaha that witnesses say blocked traffic and ran through red lights.

    The Sunday afternoon parade along Dodge Street was made up of trucks and vehicles flying Trump flags and signs, and some of them were driving recklessly, witnesses said. Callers to 911 also reported that cross traffic was blocked by parade participants on motorcycles.
    Two days after she described the president as a white supremacist, the home of Duluth Mayor Emily Larson was targeted Friday by parading pro-Donald Trump supporters honking, shouting, playing loud music and clogging the street in her Chester Park neighborhood.
    https://tucson.com/news/local/tucson...494bf6411.html

    A motorcycle escort business that stopped traffic throughout Tucson last weekend for an hourslong Donald Trump parade did so illegally, authorities say.

    In a spectacle that outraged some Tucsonans and delighted others, hundreds of cars and trucks flying MAGA and Trump flags crisscrossed the city last Saturday accompanied by uniformed private motorcycle officers who held up traffic at intersections in violation of state law, the Pima County Sheriff’s Department and the Tucson Police Department said.
    https://www.fredericknewspost.com/ne...e29025bc3.html

    The caravan also caused a significant back-up on US-40 Alt as it traveled toward Frederick.
    https://go.tiffinohio.net/2020/10/pa...gering-public/

    A group of President Donald Trump fanatics gathered Saturday in Tiffin for a pro-Trump parade throughout Seneca County, with some participants allegedly breaking traffic laws and endangering the public in the process.

    The parade, which was organized by the Seneca County Republican Party and did not have a police escort like an official parade event, began at the Tiffin Mall parking lot and went down Washington Street in Downtown Tiffin when several Facebook users reported that the parade participants were breaking traffic laws without regard for the safety of others.

    “We were on Circular and Melmore at the light and those ‘law and order’ Trumpsters were speeding and running the red lights!,” a Tiffin woman wrote in a public Facebook group.

    During the parade, Trump supporters drove around Tiffin and surrounding villages in cars, trucks, and motorcycles, bearing signs, flags, banners, and a life-size cutout of the president.

    At Circular St. and S. Washington St., a parade participant appeared to collide with another vehicle — and a photo of the crash was shared to the Seneca County Scanner group on Facebook. “Just like the Trump presidency! A total wreck!” a Tiffin man commented on the photo.

    According to a Tiffin Police Department dispatcher, an official permit was not issued for the parade. In addition to the accident at Circular and S. Washington Streets, police responded to reports of blocked intersections as a result of the parade.
    Last edited by raisedbywolves; 10-20-2020 at 01:04 PM.

  21. #46
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    ttps://abcnews.go.com/US/breonna-tay...ry?id=73719177

    Breonna Taylor grand jury members say they were not presented with homicide charges

    A Kentucky judge has ruled in favor of an anonymous grand juror in the Breonna Taylor case, allowing them to come forward and speak publicly about court proceedings.

    In a court filing on Tuesday, Jefferson Circuit Court Judge Annie O'Connell ordered that grand jurors in the case "may disclose such information, subject to the trial court's order regarding information to be redacted."

    In addition, she said: "any grand juror who chooses to disclose their identity to do so with extreme caution, for to do so may result in a level of public attention and scrutiny over which this Court will have no control." The judge wrote that the order "merely grants one grand juror's request to do so and gives others the option... any one grand juror's memory, options, perceptions are their own. No one grand juror speaks for the others, nor does one's statement carry any more weight than another's."
    A grand jury was later convened and ultimately recommended charges against former Louisville Metro Police Department Officer Brett Hankison, who is now facing three counts of wanton endangerment. Hankinson has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

    Neither Hankison nor the two other officers involved in the shooting were charged in connection with Taylor's death -- the charges against Hankison stem from the errant bullets that penetrated a wall of the residence and entered a neighboring apartment occupied by a child, a man and a pregnant woman,

    Kevin Glogower, who is now representing two anonymous grand jurors in the case, had previously asked the judge to release discovery information and to allow jurors to speak publicly, despite long-standing practices against doing so.

    He said he filed the motion over concerns about public trust and transparency, and accused the Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron of using the jurors as a shield to deflect accountability. Cameron's office denied those claims and said it was "confident" that it had presented a thorough case.

    Glogower's clients released a statement following Tuesday's order, claiming that prosecutors only presented the three wanton endangerment charges against Hankison.

    "Being one of the jurors on the Breonna Taylor case was a learning experience. The three weeks of service leading up to that presentation showed how the grand jury normally operates. The Breonna Taylor case was quite different. After hearing the Attorney General Daniel Cameron's press conference, and with my duty as a grand juror being over, my duty as a citizen compelled action," the statement said. "The grand jury did not have homicide offenses explained to them. The grand jury never heard anything about those laws. Self defense or justification was never explained either."

    They said "questions were asked about additional charges," but the grand jury was told there would be none because the prosecutors didn't feel they could make them stick.

    "The grand jury didn't agree that certain actions were justified, nor did it decide the indictment should be the only charges in the Breonna Taylor case," the statement said. "The grand jury was not given the opportunity to deliberate on those charges and deliberated only on what was presented to them. I cannot speak for other jurors but I can help the truth be told."

  22. #47
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.cnn.com/2020/10/27/us/br...iew/index.html

    Breonna Taylor grand jurors say police actions on night she died were 'negligent' and 'criminal'

    The actions of Louisville, Kentucky, police on the night Breonna Taylor was fatally shot were "negligent" and "criminal," two anonymous grand jurors in the case said in a broadcast interview to air Wednesday.

    "They were criminal leading up to this in everything that they -- the way they moved forward on it, including the warrant, was deception," a man identified only as Juror No. 2 told "CBS This Morning" in an excerpt aired Tuesday.

    The interview marks the first time the public is hearing directly from the anonymous grand jurors, who had previously commented through their attorney, saying the panel was not given an opportunity to consider homicide charges in the case against police officers who served a no-knock warrant at Taylor's home during a March drug raid.

    Another juror told CBS's Gayle King the behavior and actions of the police were "negligent."

    "They couldn't even provide a risk assessment and it sounded like they hadn't done one," Juror No. 1 told King. "So their organization leading up to this was lacking. That's what I mean by they were negligent in the operation."

    CBS said it blurred the faces of the anonymous grand jurors "for their safety."

    Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's office declined comment on Tuesday, referring to a statement last week in which the special prosecutor said he asked for an indictment on charges that could be proven under state law.
    Two anonymous grand jurors make statements about proceedings

    A state court judge ruled last week that the grand jurors may speak publicly about the case presented by Attorney General Cameron.

    "The grand jury did not have homicide offenses explained to them," the first anonymous grand juror wrote in a statement issued by attorney Kevin Glogower. "The grand jury never heard about those laws. Self-defense or justification was never explained either."

    A second grand juror echoed that statement last Thursday. The second panel member said the jury was only allowed to consider three wanton endangerment charges against one officer.

    "No opportunity to consider anything else was permitted," the grand juror said, adding that they agreed "wholeheartedly" with the first juror's statement and looked "forward to continuing to help set the record straight."

    The first grand juror said "questions were asked about additional charges" and that members were told "there would be none because the prosecutors didn't feel they could make them stick."

    "The grand jury didn't agree that certain actions were justified, nor did it decide the indictment should be the only charges in the Breonna Taylor case," the first juror said. "The grand jury was not given the opportunity to deliberate on those charges and deliberated only on what was presented to them. I can't speak for other jurors, but I can help the truth be told."

    Cameron, in a statement posted on Twitter last week, said he asked the grand jury for an indictment on charges he thought could be proven in court.
    "Indictments obtained in the absence of sufficient proof under the law do not stand up and are not fundamentally fair to anyone," he wrote.

    He also wrote that "causation, justification and (other legal issues) were always at the forefront" of his office's investigation.

    The attorney general has acknowledged wanton endangerment was the only charge his prosecutors recommended to the grand jury. Cameron has said prosecutors presented all evidence, even though the facts showed use of force by two officers not charged was "justified" because they were fired upon.

    Sam Aguiar, a lawyer for Taylor's family, said in a statement last week: "Daniel Cameron should be ashamed of himself. He made a decision based upon a political agenda."
    Back when I was in LE, we were always told that if there was a shooting that you wanted it to be presented to the Grand Jury, so that they could no bill you (or course back then LE wasn't shooting everyone left, right and center) and then it could never come back on you again. As long as the charges weren't presented to the Grand Jury, and it's still within the statute of limitations, I think they can come back at any time and present charges to another Grand Jury..so these guys need to be looking over their shoulder.

  23. #48
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.npr.org/2020/11/17/93572...taylor-protest

    Criminal charges for Kentucky state Rep. Attica Scott and more than a dozen others have been dropped. Scott was part of a group arrested in September during a demonstration against the grand jury decision not to directly charge Louisville police officers over the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor.

    Scott, who is the only Black woman serving in the Kentucky legislature and whose district includes part of Louisville, announced on Twitter that the charges had been dismissed.

    "ALL CHARGES HAVE JUST BEEN DROPPED! Thank you to all of our justice seekers, people who called, emailed and tagged the County Attorney on social media. You got it done! Our work continues as we seek justice for Breonna Taylor," Scott said on Monday.


    Scott was arrested in September and faced a charge of first-degree rioting, which is a felony. She was also facing misdemeanor charges of failure to disperse and unlawful assembly.

    The most serious charges stemmed from damage to the city's main branch of the Louisville Free Public Library on Sept 24.

    As NPR member station WFPL reported, Scott was arrested in connection with attempted arson, but the lawmaker's own livestream indicated she was not involved in the arson attempt.

    According to a statement from Jefferson County Attorney Mike O'Connell's office, the felony charges against Scott and 17 others were dropped last month. But O'Connell's office "requested additional time to review misdemeanor charges."

    On Monday, a judge dismissed charges for all but one of the group. In that case, a motion to dismiss will be considered next week, according to the statement.

    "Prosecutors have a higher duty than other lawyers to be ministers of justice and not just an advocate. This means we must always seek the truth and act upon it, rather than seek a victory in court. Our independent review of these cases demonstrates this responsibility," Josh Abner, a spokesperson for Jefferson County Attorney's office, said in a statement.

    "Today's decision is not what justice for Breonna Taylor looks like," Scott said Monday in front of the Jefferson County Courthouse, WFPL reported.

    "We are still fighting for justice for Breonna Taylor, but we are grateful these bogus misdemeanor charges were dropped," she added.

    Scott, her daughter and others were arrested as they were attempting to enter a church shortly before Louisville's citywide 9 p.m. curfew was about to go into effect. The church was "providing refuge to protesters after curfew," according to The Associated Press.

    Philadelphia Police Release 'Traumatic' Bodycam Video Of Walter Wallace Jr. Shooting
    AMERICA RECKONS WITH RACIAL INJUSTICE
    Philadelphia Police Release 'Traumatic' Bodycam Video Of Walter Wallace Jr. Shooting
    The day before the arrests, a Kentucky grand jury announced that none of the three officers involved in the shooting of Taylor, a Black woman killed in her home, would be directly charged with her death.

    One of the officers faces three counts of wonton endangerment for firing into an apartment belonging to a neighbor of Taylor's. Two other officers, including the one who FBI investigators said fired the fatal shot, have not been charged.

    Taylor was killed in her apartment during a botched narcotics raid in March. Her death, along with others including George Floyd, Rayshard Brooks and Walter Wallace Jr., have become rallying cries during national protests demanding justice for Black Americans killed by police this year.

  24. #49
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.courier-journal.com/stor...ot/6359459002/

    Adrian O. Walker, (28) a person of interest in the Breonna Taylor death has been killed

    One of Louisville's latest homicide victims is a man connected to the Breonna Taylor case who was shot and killed Thursday afternoon in west Louisville.

    Adrian O. Walker, 28, one of the main suspects in the narcotics investigation that led police to Taylor's door March 13, was found dead after noon in the 2300 block of Magazine Street.

    Walker has not been identified by the Jefferson County Coroner's Office, but two sources with knowledge of the case confirmed his identity to The Courier Journal.

    Walker's attorney, Keith Kamenish, also confirmed Thursday he had received information that Walker had been fatally shot.

    Officers with Louisville's First Division found Walker's body after police received a call about a shooting shortly after 12:30 p.m. in the 2300 block of Magazine Street.

    Police have no suspects in his death.

    Walker and several co-defendants were facing criminal charges connected to alleged drug activity in the Elliott Avenue area ? just a couple of blocks away from Thursday's fatal shooting.

    Police obtained search warrants March 12 for the Elliott Avenue homes, as well as Taylor's apartment. Police believed Taylor ex-boyfriend, Jamarcus Glover, another suspect in the narcotics investigation, was storing cash and receiving packages at her home.

    When officers broke in the door to serve the search warrant at Taylor's South End apartment shortly before 1 a.m. March 13, her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker (who isn't related to Adrian Walker), fired a shot that police said hit Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly in the thigh.

    Three officers, including Mattingly, fired 32 shots in response, hitting Taylor six times and killing her. She wasn't armed.

    Kenneth Walker said he didn't know police were at the door.

    Adrian Walker entered a not guilty plea in late July to charges of engaging in a criminal syndicate, along with drug and gun charges, in connection with the narcotics investigation that included March 13 raids on Elliott Avenue.

    He was one of the three people listed on the search warrant for Taylor's home. The search warrant, which has been called into question in recent months, identified Walker as an acquaintance of Glover.

    Earlier:Breonna Taylor had nothing to do with drug trade, ex-boyfriend says

    Dee Glover, whose brother is Jamarcus Glover, said he'd talked to Walker on Wednesday, then got a text message the next day saying Walker was dead.

    He said Walker had talked about going back to school to get an associate's degree from Jefferson Community & Technical College.

    "If I know my brother, Jamarcus is shocked and upset and extremely devastated," Dee Glover said. "And I use that word on purpose. Devastated.

    "He was already still hurting from Breonna Taylor's death. We talk about it every single time on the phone. It's 'Breonna, Breonna, Breonna.'"

    Jamarcus Glover previously told The Courier Journal she was not involved in any drug activity.

    Police wrote in an investigative report from May they believed Glover and Walker were the "sources of narcotics" for the "trap house" at 2424 Elliott Ave.

    Walker had been arrested after search warrants were executed in December at 2424 and 2426 Elliott Ave., along with 2605 W. Muhammad Ali Boulevard.

    Those arrests of Walker and Glover contributed to LMPD's Place-Based Investigations Squad investigating a drug cell on Elliott Avenue, detectives have said.

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