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Thread: Breonna Taylor (26) was shot and killed by police when they executed a "no-knock" search warrant on the wrong house

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    Breonna Taylor (26) was shot and killed by police when they executed a "no-knock" search warrant on the wrong house

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/...-home-n1205651

    A black woman was asleep in her Louisville, Kentucky, home when three police officers forced their way inside, "blindly fired" and killed her, according to a lawsuit filed by the woman's family.

    Breonna Taylor, an EMT worker, died on March 13 after officers with the Louisville Metro Police Department executed a search warrant at the wrong home, the suit states.

    Police at the time said the officers knocked on the door several times and ?announced their presence as police who were there with a search warrant.? The officers forced their way in through the door and ?were immediately met by gunfire,? Lt. Ted Eidem said at a March 13 press conference.

    Taylor's death gained national attention this week after the family hired attorney Ben Crump, who is also representing the family of Ahmaud Arbery, the black man in Georgia who died on Feb. 23 after being pursued and shot by two white men.

    "We stand with the family of this young woman in demanding answers from the Louisville Police Department," he said in a statement Monday on Twitter.

    The attorney called out the police department for not taking responsibility and not providing "any answers regarding the facts and circumstances of how this tragedy occurred."

    Crump joins Sam Aguiar and Lonita Baker in representing the family.

    The lawsuit states that Taylor and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, were asleep in the bedroom when police in plain clothes and unmarked vehicles arrived at the house around 12:30 a.m.

    The officers were looking for a suspect who lived in a different part of the city and was already in police custody after he was arrested earlier.

    The three officers entered Taylor's home "without knocking and without announcing themselves as police officers," the suit states.

    The lawsuit says Taylor and Walker woke up and thought criminals were breaking in. Walker called 911 and, according to The Courier-Journal, police said he opened fire and shot an officer.

    "The defendants then proceeded to spray gunfire into the residence with a total disregard for the value of human life," the lawsuit alleges. "Shots were blindly fired by the officers all throughout Breonna's home."

    The suit states that Walker had a license to carry and kept firearms in the home for protection.

    Taylor, 26, was shot eight times and died. Walker, 27, was arrested. According to jail records he's been charged with assault and attempted murder on a police officer. An attorney for Walker could not immediately be reached.

    "Breonna had posed no threat to the officers and did nothing to deserve to die at their hands," the suit says, adding that she was unarmed.

    "Neither of the two had any criminal history for drugs or violence," it states. No drugs were found in the home.

    The gunfire from the officers struck objects in the living room, dining room, kitchen, hallway, bathroom and both bedrooms, according to the lawsuit.

    "The officers failed to use any sound reasonable judgment whatsoever when firing more than 25 blind shots into multiple homes and causing the wrongful death of Breonna," according to the suit.

    Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer, filed the lawsuit in April in Jefferson Circuit Court alleging wrongful death, excessive force and gross negligence.

    A spokesperson for the Louisville Metro Police Department said, "Due to an ongoing internal investigation into this situation, we are not able to comment at this time."

    The officers were identified by the police department at the March 13 press conference as Jonathan Mattingly, Brett Hankison and Myles Cosgrove. All three were placed on administrative reassignment pending the outcome of an investigation.
    https://www.courier-journal.com/stor...on/3115928001/

    The LMPD investigation, records show, was centered around a "trap house" on Elliott Avenue more than 10 miles from Taylor's apartment and two suspects police believed were selling drugs at the Russell neighborhood address.

    Breonna Taylor's shooting death by Louisville Metro Police has raised questions about why police entered her home in the early morning hours of March 13 and opened fire on her in her own apartment.

    Police contend that Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, fired first, wounding an officer. Walker contends that he believed someone was breaking into the home and acted in self-defense.

    Taylor, 26, was shot eight times by officers before being pronounced dead at the scene.

    No body-camera footage is available because officers in the Criminal Interdiction Division who conducted the search warrant do not wear cameras, LMPD Chief Steve Conrad previously said.

    Attorneys, activists and family members have said that Taylor and Walker, who was with her that night, were not the main target of the search warrants police were executing that night, and demand answers as to why police were there.

    The warrant executed just before 1 a.m. March 13, however, did include Taylor's home.

    And a judge signed off on a "no-knock" provision, meaning that police could enter her house without identifying themselves as members of law enforcement.

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    Senior Member Nic B's Avatar
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    Wow, bunch of idiots.


    Quote Originally Posted by marakisses View Post
    yes i said i will leave it under you storage he said cuddle with me i said shut up it over??? what am i doing wrong??

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    This shit infuriates me
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

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    https://www.wave3.com/2020/05/16/att...e-information/

    Ben Crump, an attorney for Breonna Taylor’s family, issued a statement questioning the validity of LMPD’s justification for obtaining what is called a “no-knock warrant.”

    LMPD narcotics officers served a warrant at Taylor’s home in March, prompting a gun battle with her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker. Taylor was killed during the shootout.

    Department officials said later that the officers had a no-knock warrant, meaning they were not required to announce themselves upon entering the home, although they say they still did. Crump and Taylor’s family dispute that claim.

    LMPD said the warrant was needed because investigators said they believed suspects were storing drugs at Taylor’s home.

    Crump’s statement is below:

    "Louisville postal inspector Tony Gooden asserted that the LMPD did not use his office to verify that a drug suspect delivered packages to Breonna Taylor’s address, which directly contradicts what the police stated in the affidavit to secure a no-knock warrant for the home.

    This revelation validates what we already knew: This young woman was brutally and unjustifiably killed by Louisville police, who supplied false information on the warrant they used to enter her home unannounced. Gooden further stated that ‘no packages of interest were going there.’ We will continue to demand transparency from the Louisville police on behalf of Breonna’s family.”

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    https://www.courier-journal.com/stor...ed/5200879002/

    The three Louisville Metro Police officers who fired their guns that night ? Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and officers Brett Hankison and Myles Cosgrove ? have been placed on administrative reassignment while the department's Professional Integrity Unit investigates what happened.

    Minute by minute: What happened the night Louisville police fatally shot Breonna Taylor

    Next week, the case is expected to be turned over to the Kentucky Attorney General's office to decide if criminal charges should filed against any of the officers. The FBI and U.S. Attorney's Office is also being asked to review the investigation.

    Commonwealth's Attorney Tom Wine has recused himself from reviewing the officers' case, citing a conflict of interest because his office is pursuing attempted murder and assault charges against Taylor's boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, who fired one shot that struck Mattingly in the leg.
    Who is officer Myles Cosgrove?

    Cosgrove worked in LMPD's 8th, 4th and 6th divisions before transferring to narcotics in 2016.

    His personnel file includes commendations for his handling of a dangerous situation with someone in crisis and his involvement in training division graduation ceremonies.

    But it also includes disciplinary actions for poor court attendance and violating "courtesy" policies.

    Former police Chief Robert White wrote in a 2009 letter that Cosgrove "failed to exercise patience and diplomacy when dealing with a member of the public," garnering him a letter of reprimand.

    Before that, Cosgrove was sued for excessive force by a man he shot in 2006 at a Speedway gas station in the East End, records show. A federal judge sided with Cosgrove in the case, according to court records.

    The opinion from Judge Charles R. Simpson describes that in December 2006, Cosgrove shot 11 times at a car that backed up as the officer was trying to pull it over. Several rounds struck the vehicle and injured the driver.

    The driver and passengers sued, accusing Cosgrove of excessive force and arresting them without probable cause. But the judge found Cosgrove had sufficient facts to pull the car over.
    Who is Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly?
    On the night Taylor was killed, Mattingly was shot in the thigh. He required surgery, with officials saying he was expected to make a full recovery.

    Mattingly joined LMPD as an officer in 2000 and worked in the 2nd, 3rd, 7th and 4th divisions before joining narcotics in 2016.

    He also spent three years in the now-defunct VIPER Unit ? Violent Incident Prevention, Enforcement and Response ? which targeted "hot spots" of violent crime and Louisville's most wanted criminals.

    In 2009, Mattingly was sworn in as a sergeant.

    In his 20 years with LMPD, Mattingly has numerous commendations, letters of appreciation and award nominations in his personnel file, including as recently as August 2017.

    Praise for Mattingly includes everything from helping a citizen find their lost dog in 2001 to his roles in multiple drug busts and firearm seizures.

    Mattingly also received one reprimand: In April 2017, he used force against a suspect and failed to complete the proper documentation on the same day. The reprimand came with no further sanctions.
    Who is officer Brett Hankison?

    A transfer log from Hankison's personnel file shows he worked in LMPD's 6th Division before joining the narcotics unit in 2016.

    Chief Steve Conrad said Hankison joined the department in 2003.

    Hankison has received commendations for professionalism, his traffic stop and search warrant execution, his work responding to a 15-year-old person threatening suicide and a 2013 instance where he identified a human trafficking victim, among others.

    But his personnel file also includes a professional standards unit investigation that found Hankison violated departmental policy in three instances: Improperly charging an individual for having a shotgun in his trunk, failing to notify a superior about third-degree assault and resisting arrest charges filed against someone and failing to call for emergency help for someone after believing the individual had swallowed cocaine.

    His file contains his response, in which he disagrees with the findings, calling one "unjust." He argues he did notify his supervisor of the charges and said he didn't believe the person suspected of swallowing crack cocaine was in danger.

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    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/breonna...sville-police/

    The FBI on Thursday opened an investigation into the death of Breonna Taylor, the 26-year-old emergency medical worker who was shot and killed in her home by police in March. Police entered Taylor's home with a warrant to search for illegal drugs — but according to a suit filed by her family, none were found.

    "The FBI will collect all available facts and evidence and will ensure that the investigation is conducted in a fair, thorough and impartial manner," Robert Brown, special agent in charge with FBI Louisville, said in a statement.
    Taylor's family tells a different story, arguing in a wrongful death lawsuit that police didn't identify themselves, and that Walker, a licensed gun owner, thought someone was trying to break in.

    The lawsuit names two officers, Myles Cosgrove and Brett Hankinson, and a sergeant, Jonathan Mattingly, as defendants. It claims the trio came to the home in plainclothes and unmarked cars, and that they entered the home without saying they were police officers.

    "The Defendants then proceeded to spray gunfire into the residence with a total disregard for the value of human life," the lawsuit alleges. Taylor and Walker "believed the home had been broken into by criminals and that they were in significant, imminent danger," the suit added.
    The police department announced policy changes after Taylor's death. "No-knock" search warrants now require approval from the police chief before they're sent to a judge, and officers will be required to wear cameras when executing the warrants.

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    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...boyfriend.html

    A Kentucky prosecutor is moving to dismiss an attempted murder charge against Kenneth Walker, the boyfriend of Breonna Taylor who shot a police officer as they entered Taylor's home during a botched raid in the early morning hours of March 13.

    Tom Wine, Louisville's top prosecutor, announced on Friday that the case needs more investigation and he wants to let state and federal prosecutors finish their inquiries.

    'If, after those reviews, we believe that there is sufficient evidence to present this matter to the grand jury, we will do so,' Wine said in an online news conference.

    Taylor's boyfriend, Walker, had been charged with attempted murder of a police officer, Louisville Metro Police Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly, for shooting at officers as they served a search warrant.

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    https://www.wave3.com/2020/05/29/lmp...ville-protest/

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE) - WAVE 3 News reporter Kaitlin Rust and photojournalist James Dobson appeared to have been hit by pepper balls reportedly fired by an LMPD officer during a protest in downtown Louisville Friday night.



    It was previously reported that the officer was firing rubber bullets, but Jessie Halladay with the Louisville Metro Police Department said LMPD officers do not use rubber bullets, and it was likely that was Rust and Dobson were hit with pepper balls.

    In response to what happened to Rust and Dobson, WAVE 3 News General Manager Ken Selvaggi issued a statement saying, “We strongly condemn the actions of the LMPD officer who tonight repeatedly fired at and hit our reporter and cameraman, both of whom were courageously and lawfully covering breaking news in their community. There is simply no justification for the Louisville police to wantonly open fire, even with pepper balls, on any journalists under any circumstances.”

    During night two of several hundred protesters gathering downtown, crowds appear to be larger and police were continuing their efforts to clear the area into the early hours Saturday.

    A WAVE 3 News vehicle was found vandalized downtown as the crowd intensified.
    WAVE 3 News car vandalized in downtown Louisville during a protest for Breonna Taylor.
    WAVE 3 News car vandalized in downtown Louisville during a protest for Breonna Taylor. (Source: WAVE 3 News)

    Rust appeared to have been hit in the video above as she reported during a live segment on WAVE 3 News during the ongoing protest.

    Seven people were shot and two officers were hospitalized following the protests Thursday night, an effort to have action taken against three LMPD officers involved in the death of Breonna Taylor in March. Taylor was shot during a no-knock warrant that was being served at her home.

    Friday morning, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer announced no-knock warrants would be suspended in the city.

    Read the full statement from WAVE 3 News management below on the events that transpired Thursday:


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    https://www.vox.com/2020/6/1/2127670...e-floyd-police

    A man was shot and killed in Louisville, Kentucky, on Sunday night after police officers and National Guard troops began firing into a crowd.

    Residents have taken to the streets of Louisville, like thousands of Americans around the country, to protest the killings of black people at the hands of police — specifically, George Floyd, who died after being pinned by the neck by a Minneapolis police officer, and Breonna Taylor, who was shot in her Louisville apartment in March by officers who were looking for someone else. At many protests across America, police have attacked protesters, beating them with batons, shooting them with rubber bullets, and driving cars into crowds.

    In downtown Louisville on Sunday night, police and the National Guard were sent to break up a crowd that had gathered in a parking lot, Louisville Metro Police Chief Steve Conrad said in a statement, according to NBC.

    Officers “were shot at,” Conrad said, and they “returned fire.” Now, a man is dead.

    Officials have not yet confirmed his identity, or who fired the shot. But here is what we do know about the incident on Sunday that ended in his death.

    What we know
    Police and the National Guard were sent to a parking lot at 26th and Broadway in Louisville on Sunday at about 12:15 pm, according to NBC. Like many cities around the country in recent days, Louisville has imposed a curfew, which began at 9 pm.
    Police say they began shooting after being fired on by the crowd. “Officers and soldiers began to clear the lot and at some point were shot at,” Conrad said in his statement. “Both LMPD and national guard members returned fire.”
    A man was fatally shot.
    It is not clear whether the crowd in the parking lot was actually protesting at the time. One bystander told reporters they were not engaged in protest, and were merely out past the city’s curfew.
    Police say they are collecting video and investigating the killing.
    Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear has ordered an independent investigation by state police. “Given the seriousness of the situation, I have authorized the Kentucky State Police to independently investigate the event,” he said in a statement Monday.
    What we don’t know
    The identity of the victim has not been released.
    According to NBC, Conrad did not specify who shot the man. However, the Louisville news station WLKY is reporting that he was shot by law enforcement.
    What we know about the protests and police violence in Louisville and around the country
    Louisville residents have been rising up in recent days against police violence around the country, and in their hometown. On March 13, Breonna Taylor, an EMT who was providing health care during the coronavirus pandemic, was shot and killed in her apartment at night by police looking for someone who didn’t live there.
    The FBI recently opened an investigation into Taylor’s killing. As public attention to Taylor’s death grew in May, Conrad, the police chief, announced his upcoming retirement. He is slated to retire in June.
    Seven people were shot at a protest in Louisville on Thursday night. However, the mayor said at the time that police were not responsible for the shooting.
    On Friday night, police shot two journalists at local station WAVE 3 News with pepper balls as they were reporting on the protests. “The two had been following police instructions, were standing behind the police line when they were fired upon, and were not disrupting or otherwise interfering with law enforcement,” WAVE 3 News general manager Ken Selvaggi said in a statement.
    Across the nation, police officers have repeatedly been captured on camera in recent days attacking protesters, beating them with batons, ramming them with cars, and even spraying mace at a child.

  10. #10
    It was aliens raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    This case breaks my heart, and I'm surprised there wasn't more outraged about it at the time. I guess all the lockdowns and social distancing were part of how this played out. I just don't understand how the officers didn't do their due diligence when getting the warrants, and how they ended up at the wrong place. They entered a house without knocking, in the middle of the night, and the occupants thought they were being robbed. They had a lawful gun and they tried to defend themselves. As a lawful gun owner, I would have pulled my gun if I heard someone coming into my house like this. No questions asked.

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    https://www.wlky.com/article/after-a...shear/32733737

    FRANKFORT, Ky. —

    Standing in the highest court in Kentucky, Breonna Taylor's mother called for justice for her daughter on Monday, but also pleaded with protesters to remain calm after an African American man was fatally shot while police tried to disperse a crowd.

    "We can't get justice with violence," said Tamika Taylor, appearing with Gov. Andy Beshear inside the Kentucky Supreme Court. "It doesn't make sense. It doesn't help."
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    Beshear called on Louisville Metro Police and Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer to release video as quickly as possible of the fatal shooting of David McAtee.

    McAtee was killed around 12:15 a.m. Monday in the parking lot of Dino's Food Mart, located at 26th and Broadway. LMPD officers and Kentucky National Guard troops opened fire when they were breaking up a large group and someone fired a shot at them, said LMPD Chief Steve Conrad.

    Kentucky State Police troopers were not involved in the shooting, so Beshear is calling upon KSP to handle the investigation.

    "The group that is on the ground from the Kentucky State Police is the group that investigates shootings and other police units across the state," he said. "They are the independent group that does this."

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    https://www.wdrb.com/in-depth/louisv...cfd65671a.html

    Update the Police Chief of Louisville has been fired for the handling of the Breonna Taylor protests and now the David McAtee Death

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer fired police chief Steve Conrad on Monday after learning that police officers did not record body-camera footage of the fatal shooting of David McAtee, a black man, in west Louisville in the early morning hours.

    "This type of institutional failure will not be tolerated," Fischer said.

    Conrad's firing comes only a month before he was set to retire after leading the department for eight years.

    McAtee was killed amid a gunfight involving LMPD officers and National Guard troops who were trying to disperse a crowd at Dino's Food Mart, a gas station-restaurant at 26th Street and West Broadway.

    The death of McAtee, who ran a bar-b-que stand near the area of last night's incident, has further inflamed community tensions about police brutality after four nights of consecutive protests over the March killing of Breonna Taylor.

    LMPD acting chief Robert Schroeder, who was promoted from his role as assistant chief on Monday, said during Fischer's news conference that police don't know who shot McAtee.

    "We do not know if it was related to a separate incident (or) if it was due to the shots fired by our officers and the national guardsmen soldiers who accompanied them," Schroeder said.

    Earlier on Monday, before his firing, Conrad implied that law enforcement was responsible for McAtee's death, saying, "Officers and soldiers ... were shot at. Both LMPD and National Guard members returned fire. We have one man dead at the scene."

    But later on Monday, a spokeswoman for the Fischer's office clarified: "What we know is that two LMPD officers and two Guardsmen fired their weapons. Determining who shot Mr. McAtee is part of the investigation."

    The two LMPD officers who fired shots have been placed on administrative leave, Schroeder said.

    "We are working diligently to determine what happened," he said. "The community has a lot of questions and we share those questions."

    The incident began about 12:15 am when police commanders sent the officers to the food mart to break up a big crowd and enforce Fischer's dusk-to-dawn curfew.

    Silent video from the city's "real-time crime center" cameras mounted on utility poles shows, which Schroeder played during the news conference, "clearly shows the officers reacting to gunfire,” he said.

    Schroeder also played audio from police radio transmissions, which reflected a frenetic scene.

    Asked whether any LMPD officers were wearing active body cameras, Schroeder declined to answer, saying, "That is part of the investigation."

    He promised "discipline" for the failure to comply with the department's body camera policy but did not elaborate.

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    https://www.wlky.com/article/shots-f...aths/32739865#

    Reports of Looting and shots fired at a Louisville area supermarket during the Breonna Taylor and David McAtee protests.

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. —
    Shots were fired in the area of 26th and Broadway early Tuesday morning, and the nearby Kroger was looted as unrest continues following the deaths of Breonna Taylor and David McAtee.

    In a video you can see in the player above, dozens of people were seen running out of the Kroger with carts full of items.


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    That store is boarded up now. Officials said no one was injured.

    A security guard told WLKY it took officers approximately 45 minutes to respond. He said it was his understanding police were waiting for backup to arrive.

    WLKY's Marvis Herring said residents helped clean up the Kroger parking lot.

    "This Kroger has been here since I was a little girl. A lot of people shop here, especially the elderly," one woman said. "This is one of the only Kroger stores in the area and most people won't have transportation to travel to other stores."

    Police have not yet said if any arrests were made in Tuesday morning's incident.

    Shortly before the looting, a fire broke out at Dino's Food Mart, which is across the street from Kroger. It's not clear what actually caused the fire at Dino's Food Mart but crews were able to quickly put it out.

    McAtee died Monday morning as LMPD and the National Guard were at Dino's Food Mart attempting to disperse a crowd, police said.

    Officials said the officers body cameras were not activated, which last week the mayor said is now mandatory for all officers. The FBI Louisville, Kentucky State Police and the U.S. Attorney’s Office will investigate McAtee's death.

    Taylor was shot and killed by Louisville Metro Police in March while officers were conducting a raid at her apartment. Her mother spoke at a press conference on Monday, asking for justice to be served. Here's what she had to say.

    Breonna Taylor's mother after days of protests: 'We can't get justice with violence'
    The mayor has extended a dusk-to-dawn curfew. It's now in effect until June 8. Click here for what you need to know about the curfew.

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    https://www.whas11.com/article/news/...a-ef04188be14b


    LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Three people were arresting during the protests over Breonna Taylor's case in downtown Louisville, citations show.

    According to arrest citations, Stephanie Garvin and David Wheatley were arrested and charged with first degree riot and criminal mischief.

    The Louisville Metro Detention Center said Wheatley, 27, was seen breaking the window of a LMDC van. Cameras also caught him breaking a window on the side of the Metro Corrections building.

    Garvin, 28, was also seen busting out the window of the van and throwing things at the Metro Corrections building.

    Adair Henderson was arrested for disorderly conduct and failure to disperse.

    None of the people arrested were connected to the shooting during the protest. LMPD said two of the seven people shot required surgery, and one of the victims was in critical condition as of 10 a.m. Friday.

    Lt. Col. LaVita Chavous said the shots came from the crowd, and the department currently has no leads on the shooter. The homicide unit is investigating.

    The protest started peacefully at around 7 p.m., but became more aggressive when people destroyed nearby cars and windows. Chavous said police began to move in once they saw "significant property damage."

    Chavous also said officers deployed tear gas, pepper balls and smoke grenades after shots were fired.

    Taylor's sister released a statement that night, asking people to stop before people got hurt.

    "Thank you so much for saying Breona's name tonight," she said. "We are not going to stop until we get justice, but we should stop tonight before people get hurt. Please go home, be safe, and be ready to keep fighting. We appreciate it more than you know."

    Chavous said LMPD is preparing for more protests.

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    https://www.wcvb.com/article/hundred...ylor/32755521#

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. —
    It was a mostly calm sixth night of protest in Louisville.


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    Sister station WLKY captured footage of hundreds of cars lined up in honor of David McAtee and Breonna Taylor around 1 a.m. Wednesday.

    In the video, you can see cars making their way to the site where McAtee was shot and killed by police early Monday morning.

    McAtee was shot as police and National Guard members tried to disperse a large crowd, according to police, who said officers returned fire after being fired upon. The city has a dusk-to-dawn curfew after nights of protests.

    On Tuesday, Louisville Metro Police released security camera video related to the case.

    McAtee's mom, Odessa Riley, said the video raises more questions than it provides answers. She vows in the name of her son to get justice in his death as the Kentucky State Police and the FBI are conducting their own investigations.

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    https://www.wave3.com/2020/06/03/bla...eful-progress/


    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE) - Black business owners in Louisville have been thinking about what their roles will be as the city moves into the future after days of unrest.

    From the heart of downtown, down West Broadway, and into the Highlands, protesters have marched through the streets.

    Black-owned business owners that spoke to WAVE 3 News on Wednesday said they’re proud of what is being done, but some were on edge when a smaller group of people began looting over the weekend.

    "The past couple nights there's been peace and that's what we need," Anthony Hunter, one of the owners of the Black Italian restaurant in the Highlands, said. "Lets keep the unity together and lets keep it going in the right direction. But, yeah, we were a little nervous, you know."

    Hunter and his wife Paula Hunter own the restaurant.

    “He grills all the meats,” she said. “I do all the pastas. Then, we blend the two flavors together. Authentic Italian with a touch of soul.”

    Nearby, people can see the open wounds of broken glass, bandaged by plywood.



    When thinking about the healing process the city will undertake, the couple said it’s important as business owners to be supportive of protesters and what they want to see done. They said they’re also helping other neighboring businesses clean up.

    At Kula Gallery on 4th Street, Jamie Lane is doing the same.

    Lane adde she’s organized a community coalition for businesses trying to clean up, and has printed black-owned business signs for those who think now is a critical time to express that.

    Lane added she’s organized a community coalition for businesses trying to clean up and has printed black-owned business signs for those who think now is a critical time to express that.

    "We're here," Lane said. "We work hard for this. Me and the artist have been working together since high school. So, I can definitely say we have worked hard for what we have today."

    The Hunter family said they’re happy to see people from all walks of life coming together and staying peaceful while hoping for progress.

    “It gives me goosebumps because we are two different races and we have a daughter that’s now another race,” Paula Hunter said. “So, when you see that unity, it just makes you realize there are good people in the world and it is going to get better.”

  17. #17
    It was aliens raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/nbcblk/...aylor-n1228896

    Louisville police investigating sexual assault accusations against officer in Breonna Taylor shooting

    Police in Louisville, Kentucky, are investigating allegations by at least two women that they were sexually assaulted by an officer involved in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor.

    The allegations against Officer Brett Hankison were posted on social media in the past week, and they are similar — both women say they were sexually assaulted after he gave them rides home from a bar.

    Dwight Mitchell, a spokesman for the Louisville Metro Police Department, told NBC News on Wednesday: "LMPD is aware of these allegations and investigators are looking into them. If anyone has information about these cases, we encourage them to call (502) 574-7144."
    A woman identified as Margo Borders, said in a June 4 Facebook post that on one occasion in April 2018, she went out to a bar with friends. When she went to call an Uber to get home, she said an officer she had interacted with on many occasions at bars in St. Matthews, a city in the Louisville metropolitan area, offered her a ride home.

    "He drove me home in uniform, in his marked car, invited himself into my apartment and sexually assaulted me while I was unconscious," she wrote.

    She said it took her months to process what had happened and to realize that it wasn't her fault.

    She said she did not go to police because she feared retaliation.

    "I had no proof of what happened and he had the upper hand because he was a police officer," she wrote. "Who do you call when the person who assaulted you is a police officer? Who were they going to believe? I knew it wouldn't be me."

    Borders referenced Taylor's shooting in her post, suggesting that it was Hankison's involvement in that which prompted her to come forward.

    A second woman, Emily Terry, also gave her account on Facebook on June 4, writing that in early fall 2019, she was walking home from a bar intoxicated. She said a police officer pulled up next to her and offered her a ride home.

    "I thought to myself, 'Wow. That is so nice of him,'" she wrote, adding that she willingly got into his car.

    "He began making sexual advances towards me; rubbing my thigh, kissing my forehead, and calling me 'baby,'" she wrote. "Mortified, I did not move. I continued to talk about my grad school experiences and ignored him."

    As soon as he pulled up to her apartment building, she said, she got out of the car and ran to the back.

    "My friend reported this the next day, and of course nothing came from it," she wrote. "Flash forward, I see his face. This face. Involved with the shooting of Breonna Taylor."

    It is unclear who Terry's friend reported the incident to. NBC News attempted to reach Borders and Terry at numbers listed for them and via social media but did not immediately hear back Wednesday.
    The Louisville police department's Public Integrity Unit previously cleared Hankison on two unrelated accusations involving sexual misconduct, according to the Louisville Courier-Journal. NBC News was unable to confirm this report.

  18. #18
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    https://www.wave3.com/2020/06/14/bey...reonna-taylor/


    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE) - Grammy winning singer and songwriter Beyonce has written an open letter to Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron asking for justice for Breonna Taylor.

    The letter, posted on Beyonce’s website Sunday, asks Cameron to bring charges against the three Louisville Metro Police officers involved in the search warrant leading to the death of Breonna Taylor back in March.

    Taylor was shot and killed after three plainclothes officers executed the search warrant in her apartment on March 13. Kenneth Walker, Taylor’s boyfriend, said he believed the officers were intruders, leading to the exchange of gunfire between him and the three officers. Taylor was hit multiple times and later died.

    “Three months have passed - and zero arrests have been made, and no officers have been fired,” Beyonce said in the letter. “The LMPD’s investigation was turned over to your office, and yet all of the officers involved in the shooting remain employed by the LMPD. Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly and Officers Myles Cosgrove and Brett Hankison must be held accountable for their actions.”

    The letter continues asking for justice for Breonna’s family.

    “Ms. Taylor’s family has not been able to take time to process and grieve,” Beyonce said. “Instead, they have been working tirelessly to rally the support of friends, their community, and the country to obtain justice for Breonna.”

    Beyonce asks for Cameron to bring criminal charges agains Mattingly, Cosgrove and Hankison, to commit to transparency in the investigation and prosecution, and to investigate LMPD’s response to Taylor’s murder and practices leading to “repeated deaths of unarmed Black citizens”.

    “Don’t let this case fall into the pattern of no action after a terrible tragedy,” Beyonce said. “With every death of a Black person at the hands of the police, there are two real tragedies: the death itself, and the inaction and delays that follow it. This is your chance to end that pattern. Take swift and decisive action in charging the officers. The nex months cannot look like the last three.”

  19. #19
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    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...fired-n1231571

    One of the three police officers involved in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky, is being fired, Mayor Greg Fischer announced Friday.

    The chief of the Louisville Metro Police Department, Rob Schroeder, is initiating termination procedures against the officer, Brett Hankison, the mayor said in a statement.
    Fisher said that "unfortunately," he and Schroeder could not talk about "what brought us to this moment, or even the timing of this decision," because of a provision in state law. He added that he would like to see the law changed.

    Taylor, 26, an African American emergency-room technician who was killed by police on March 13 after three plainclothes officers used a "no-knock" warrant to enter her apartment around 12:40 a.m. as part of a drug investigation. Taylor was shot eight times.

    Taylor's family has named Hankison along with Officers Jonathan Mattingly and Myles Cosgrove in a wrongful death lawsuit.

  20. #20
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    https://fox40.com/news/national-and-...hooting-fired/

    Update on the Breonna Taylor case


    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — The Louisville Metro police department has fired one of the police officers involved in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor, more than three months after the 26-year-old Black woman was killed in her home.

    A termination letter sent to Officer Brett Hankison released by the city’s police department Tuesday said Hankinson violated procedures by showing “extreme indifference to the value of human life” when he “wantonly and blindly” shot 10 rounds of gunfire into Taylor’s apartment in March. The letter also said Hankison, who is white, violated the rule against using deadly force.

    Taylor was shot eight times by officers who burst into her Louisville home using a no-knock warrant during a March 13 narcotics investigation. The warrant to search her home was in connection with a suspect who did not live there, and no drugs were found inside.

    The no-knock search warrant that allows police to enter without first announcing their presence was recently banned by Louisville’s Metro Council.

    The letter said Hankison fired the rounds “without supporting facts” that the deadly force was directed at a person posing an immediate threat.

    “I find your conduct a shock to the conscience,” interim Louisville Police Chief Robert Schroeder said in the letter. “Your actions have brought discredit upon yourself and the Department.”

    The announcement comes after Mayor Greg Fischer said last week that Schroeder had started termination proceedings for Hankison while two other officers remain on administrative reassignment as the shooting is investigated.

    Sam Aguiar, an attorney for Taylor’s family, previously said the move to fire Hankison was long overdue. “It’s about damn time,” he said, adding Hankison was an officer who “plagued our streets and made this city worse for over a dozen years.”

    “Let’s hope that this is a start to some good, strong criminal proceedings against Officer Hankison, because he definitely deserves to at least be charged,” Aguiar added.

    Protesters calling for justice in Taylor’s shooting have taken their calls to the streets amid the international protests over racism and police violence after the death of George Floyd, a Black man who died after a Minneapolis police officer pressed his knee into Floyd’s neck for several minutes as he pleaded for air.

    This month, Beyonc? also joined the call for charges against officers involved in Taylor’s death. The singer sent a letter to Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, saying the three Louisville police officers “must be held accountable for their actions.”

    “Your office has both the power and the responsibility to bring justice to Breonna Taylor, and demonstrate the value of a Black woman’s life,” said the letter released on the singer’s website.

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