Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Hanau/Germany: 11 dead, including suspect, in shooting

  1. #1
    Senior Member StarrySky87's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,473
    Rep Power
    5618350

    Hanau/Germany: 11 dead, including suspect, in shooting

    You guys don't seem to care much about shootings/mass murders that happen outside of the US, but I'll post this anyway. Maybe some of you are even familiar with Hanau because of Army Air Field.

    Right-wing extremism suspected in Germany shooting that left 11 dead, including suspect
    Shots were fired at two different locations in Hanau, authorities said.

    By Sarah Hucal, Julia Jacobo, William Mansell and Bill Hutchinson
    20 February 2020, 16:45
    5 min read

    A mass shooting in Germany that left 11 people dead, including the suspected gunman, appears to have been motivated by racist, right-wing extremist views, authorities said.
    The massacre in the Frankfurt suburb of Hanau erupted around 10 p.m. Wednesday at two hookah bars in the city of fewer than 100,000 people.

    "Racism is poison, hatred is poison and this poison exists in society and it is to blame for far too many crimes," German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Thursday morning. "There are many indications at the moment that the perpetrator acted on right-wing extremist, racist motives, out of hatred towards people of other origins, religions and appearance."

    The mass shooting follows a series of right-right extremist attacks in Germany, including one in October at a synagogue in Halle that left two people dead and the June assassination of pro-migrant politician Walter Lubcke by a suspect with right-wing links who confessed to the murder.
    The killing rampage on Wednesday in Hanau was carried out by 43-year-old man authorities would only identify as Tobias R.

    German federal prosecutors said Thursday that they are taking charge of the investigation.
    Investigators are examining a video the suspect posted online in which he allegedly expressed right-wing conspiracy theories, German Public Prosecutor General Peter Frank said at a news conference, along with writings.
    "In addition to confused thoughts and conspiracy theories, [the video and writing] shows deeply racist attitudes," Frank said. "That is why I have taken over the investigation in this case."

    Authorities cautioned that investigators have not established a clear link between the online videos and Wednesday's attack.
    While German police said they believe the deceased suspect is the lone person responsible, federal investigators are looking into whether the suspect received support in the attack, adding that they are attempting to clarify the alleged gunman's background and contacts both in Germany and abroad.

    Shots were fired at two separate hookah bars in Hanau, according to a statement from local authorities. The city is located about 15 miles east of Frankfurt.
    Kemal Aydin, Turkey's ambassador to Berlin, told reporters that five Turkish nationals were among those killed.
    The alleged perpetrator was later found dead at his home. It was there police said they found another dead body, officials said.

    Nine others died after incidents at the Kurt-Schumacher-Platz and Heumarkt areas.
    Witness accounts said a vehicle fled the scene of the shootings, which led authorities to the alleged suspect's home.
    The shooting comes less than three years after an 18-year-old gunman killed nine people at a shopping mall in Munich before taking his own life. Bavarian authorities said the July 2016 attack was "politically motivated" and said the teenage suspect had "radical right-wing and racist views."
    source: https://abcnews.go.com/International...ry?id=69082981

    The victims' full names are typically not published in German media, so I can not search for social media profiles.
    This is awful. I send my condolences to the families and if anybody still thinks Germany has no problem with fascism, he's definitely wrong. Fuck nazis.

  2. #2
    It was aliens raisedbywolves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    13,892
    Rep Power
    21474857
    Quote Originally Posted by StarrySky87 View Post
    You guys don't seem to care much about shootings/mass murders that happen outside of the US, but I'll post this anyway. Maybe some of you are even familiar with Hanau because of Army Air Field.



    source: https://abcnews.go.com/International...ry?id=69082981

    The victims' full names are typically not published in German media, so I can not search for social media profiles.
    This is awful. I send my condolences to the families and if anybody still thinks Germany has no problem with fascism, he's definitely wrong. Fuck nazis.
    This is awful, and I have been following. Sadly, not too many people making threads these days, and with my new rental house work I am gone most days and don't have the time I used to have to do as much posting.

    Fascism is making a sweeping recovery around the globe. It's fucking scary.

  3. #3
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Under your bed
    Posts
    17,240
    Rep Power
    21474860
    We do care and I've been following it. Right wing extremists need to be disarmed.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

  4. #4
    It was aliens raisedbywolves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    13,892
    Rep Power
    21474857
    https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/20/europ...grm/index.html

    Germany has a growing far-right problem. The deadly terrorist attack in Hanau has made that clear.

    Chancellor Angela Merkel said the gunman suspected of killing 10 people -- nine of whom had "immigrant backgrounds" -- appeared to have acted out of "right-wing extremist, racist motives." Prosecutors said he posted xenophobic conspiracy theories online and was believed to have a far-right background.

    The mass shooting in Hanau was Germany's third deadly attack linked to right-wing suspects in just a year. There have been countless other foiled attacks and threats.

    Tina D?rr, a research assistant at the Hesse Democracy Center at Marburg University, said the trend was clear: "We did have attacks which we could call right-wing extremist terror before. What we see now is that it happens more often."

    Experts said the recent rise in violent right-wing attacks goes hand in hand with the growing success of the Alternative for Germany (AfD), which in 2017 became the first far-right party to win seats in Germany's parliament in almost 60 years.

    "The AfD, as a far-right party, promotes apocalyptic far-right rhetoric, which ... paints a picture of an immediate threat that has to be addressed in any way possible," said Jan Rathje, a political scientist at the Amadeu Antonio Foundation in Berlin, which runs educational projects and researches right-wing extremism, racism and anti-Semitism.

    "They are basically promoting the same narratives that spread in the far-right conspiracy groups ... that white people are being exterminated via migration or other means, and that they have to react, and that now is the time or we will all be gone."

    Rathje said there was a clear connection between the kind of toxic rhetoric the AfD is known for and someone deciding to "take the actions into their own hands."

    The AfD was quick to dismiss any links between the party and the spate of extremist attacks. J?rg Meuthen, the federal spokesperson for the party, said the Hanau attack was "neither right-wing nor left-wing terror, this is a delusional act of a madman."
    "Any form of politicization of this terrible act is a cynical mistake. Instead, all people in our country should mourn the loss of the victims together with their relatives," he said on his official Twitter account.

    But according to D?rr, recent studies show that people who might have always believed in extreme right-wing ideology are now getting "activated" by the shift in mainstream politics. "We see that in the political arena, in the parliament, we have people who are more aggressive, and then the same fight takes place in the streets where we have people who feel the need to act on this," she said.

    The AfD is now the largest opposition party in parliament. It focuses largely on rejecting migration and Islam -- directing much of its fury at Chancellor Angela Merkel's refugee policy. In the state of Hesse, where Wednesday's attack took place, the AfD gained 13% of the vote in the 2018 regional elections, up from 4% in 2013.

    Simon Cornwall, an extremism expert and a fellow at the German Institute on Radicalization and De-radicalization Studies, said that while the AfD wants to distance itself from attacks like this one, their rhetoric is used by people who might want to attack for other reasons.

    "Whereas before, they might have just been seen as some sort of lunatic going out in the street shooting people, now they say I'm actually doing it because of the rhetoric that I'm reading online because of this perception that we're in danger," he said.
    Right-wing extremism on the rise

    The German Office for Protection of the Constitution warned in June last year that right-wing extremism was on the rise in Germany. It said that there was evidence of a "high willingness" of right-wing extremists to use violence.

    Its latest report on extremism said the authorities were aware of at least 24,100 people who were active within various far-right organizations. It added that more than half of them were classified as violent and that at the end of 2018, around 910 members of the far right scene in Germany scene had gun permits.

    But the report also pointed out that the fragmentation of the extreme-right scene means there was a high danger of lone-wolf-style attacks by people who are not known to the authorities.

    That seems to have been the case with the suspected killer from Hanau. Hesse's interior minister Peter Beuth said the suspect did not have a criminal record but he did have "xenophobic" material on his website.

    Rathje said online radicalization is a growing problem. "On a quantitative level, we can see that the amount of racist, anti-Semitic, (homophobic) and transphobic comments on the internet -- and not to speak of anti-feminist rhetoric -- is on the rise in Germany, like in many Western countries," he said.

    "There's a very strong tradition in Germany of right-wing terrorism which is more traditionally focused, like organizations with clear connections to neo-Nazism ... now the online [radicalism] culture has spread to Germany too," he said.

  5. #5
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Under your bed
    Posts
    17,240
    Rep Power
    21474860
    Thanks Trump.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

  6. #6
    It was aliens raisedbywolves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    13,892
    Rep Power
    21474857
    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/c...oting-n1140231

    Thousands of people gathered for candlelight vigils in about 50 German cities on Thursday evening, after a gunman killed 11 people including himself, and injured several others in a rampage with suspected far-right motives.

    In the city of Hanau, where the shooting occurred, German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier told crowds that Germans and foreigners should unite to defeat racism.

    "We are mourning, we are taking part in vigils and we see that we are united both in our mourning and against racism and violence," Steinmeier said Thursday after laying a wreath outside one of the bars where the shootings happened.

    Police are investigating online materials written by the suspected shooter, a 43-year-old German national who is thought to have held a number of right-wing views.

    On Friday, hundreds of flocking to prayers in the mosques of Hanau. German and Turkish flags flew at half-staff outside a mosque where worshippers were gathering, according to the Associated press

    Germany's top security official said authorities would step up the police presence throughout the country and keep a closer watch on mosques and other sites, in a first reaction to the rampage.

    Turkish officials have said five of the victims were Turkish nationals. Germany’s federal prosecutor, Peter Frank, said all nine people killed were foreigners, according to the AP.

    Turkey’s Foreign Ministry said the Hanau shootings were a call to action, not just in the town but across Europe.

    "The indifference shown in Europe to the fight against rising xenophobia has led to new attacks being added every day,” the ministry said in a statement Friday.

    The Confederation of the Communities of Kurdistan in Germany said several victims were Kurdish and accused Germany's political leaders of "not resolutely opposing right-wing networks and right-wing terrorism."

    Bild, the country's biggest-selling newspaper, wrote on its front page: "We need new and stricter laws to regularly and thoroughly check owners of hunting and firearm licenses."

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel spoke in Berlin on Thursday morning.

    "There are many indications at the moment that the perpetrator acted on right-wing extremist, racist motives, out of hatred toward people of other origins, religion or appearance," she said.

    "Racism is poison, hatred is poison and this poison exists in society, and it is to blame for too many crimes."

    The incident comes as Germany is on high alert over concerns about the rise of the far-right groups. Germany's far-right party Alternative for Germany (AfD) has disrupted the final stages of Merkel's four-term chancellorship.

  7. #7
    Senior Member StarrySky87's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,473
    Rep Power
    5618350
    8 names have been published.

    Ferhat Uenver, 22
    Mercedes Kierpacz, 35
    Sedat Guerbuez
    Goekhan Gueltekin, 37 (https://www.facebook.com/gokhan.gogo.58)
    Hamza Kurtović, 20
    Kalojan Welkow, 30
    Vili Viorel Păun, 23
    Said Nesar Hashemi, 21/22

    source (German): https://www.hessenschau.de/opfer-des...chlag-100.html
    Last edited by raisedbywolves; 02-22-2020 at 06:03 AM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member StarrySky87's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,473
    Rep Power
    5618350
    Sigh.

    It's Ferhat Guenver, Sedat Guerbuez, Goekhan Gueltekin.

  9. #9
    Senior Member StarrySky87's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,473
    Rep Power
    5618350
    *Ferhat Uenver

  10. #10

  11. #11
    Senior Member StarrySky87's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,473
    Rep Power
    5618350
    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    I'd give you some reputation, but MDS doesn't allow me to. Thanks for creating that article!

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •