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Thread: COVID-19 Novel Coronavirus pandemic

  1. #951

  2. #952
    Senior Member Queena's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnLanders View Post
    Isn't small rural towns getting hit the hardest with COVID-19 and the fastest because these areas do not enforce COVID-19 rules like California do. Sorry to hear that COVID-19 truthers and Anti-Vaxxers have exploited your son though.
    I'm not sure what you mean by exploited. My town is being hit hard, but I'm from Chicago. I lost my step father today, a friend yesterday, and my aunt lost 3 childhood friends. All within the past 72 hours. I know 6 people that have died and know of many more. I lost 2 cousins within 3 weeks. A childhood friend on her way to the hospital. This is devastating and I'm not sure how this country can recover, unless we shut completely down. I've never seen anything like this in my life. Not even during the 80s and 90s with AIDS. Please be safe.

  3. #953
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Queena View Post
    I'm not sure what you mean by exploited. My town is being hit hard, but I'm from Chicago. I lost my step father today, a friend yesterday, and my aunt lost 3 childhood friends. All within the past 72 hours. I know 6 people that have died and know of many more. I lost 2 cousins within 3 weeks. A childhood friend on her way to the hospital. This is devastating and I'm not sure how this country can recover, unless we shut completely down. I've never seen anything like this in my life. Not even during the 80s and 90s with AIDS. Please be safe.
    I'm so sorry for your losses Queena. I lost a friend back in the summer, and it really opened my eyes. I was always careful and followed the rules before then (mask, stay at home if possible, social distancing) but after he died it really hit home. I don't understand the people that deny it or that flaunt the rules. I read a story the other day about a nurse up in the midwest that talked about patients who were dying that were still denying that it existed-they kept saying it had to be pneumonia or lung cancer because COVID didn't exist. She said they were really angry because they couldn't believe that their denial and politics had cost them their lives. I cannot understand how people nowadays can be like that...its like the Dark Ages again.

  4. #954
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://ktla.com/news/nationworld/ma...-with-assault/

    What a male Karen!


    A man seen forcefully exhaling on two women outside President Donald Trump’s Virginia golf course has been charged with assault.

    Raymond Deskins, 61, was charged with misdemeanor assault after a private citizen obtained a warrant through a county magistrate, the Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office said Sunday. Deskin did not immediately return a request for comment.

    Video widely shared on social media shows Deskins blowing air on two unidentified women after one of them asks him to get away and points out that he’s not wearing a mask.

    “That’s assault” one of the women said afterwards.

    “I breathed on you,” Deskins replied.

    Virginia mandates masks be worn in certain locations to stop the spread of the coronavirus, but they are not required to be worn outside.

    The altercation happened Saturday outside Trump National Golf Club, where the president was playing. Protestors and supporters regularly gather outside the club’s entrance when he plays.

    Deskin was wearing a Trump shirt and an inflatable pool tube with Trump’s likeness on it around his waist.

    Several members of the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors sent a letter to law enforcement authorities Sunday asking for a full investigation. The letter said the two women had been protesting the president outside the golf club.

    The sheriff’s office said the altercation was investigated at the scene but was not witnessed by law enforcement and the video did not capture its entirety. The sheriff’s office said it advised the two parties who said they’d been assaulted that they could seek a warrant through a county magistrate.

  5. #955
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://ktla.com/news/nationworld/ne...han-10-people/

    Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak announced plans Sunday to tighten restrictions on casinos, restaurants and private gatherings such as Thanksgiving dinner in an effort to contain the spread of the coronavirus.

    The new restrictions, which are scheduled to go into effect on Tuesday, come amid an unprecedented surge that has broken records in the state in terms of cases, deaths and infection rates throughout November.

    The virus has surged throughout the United States and prompted governors to issue a patchwork of area-specific restrictions. California has curfew order in effect in the majority of its counties and, earlier Sunday, Los Angeles County suspended outdoor dining.

    Sisolak, who has avoided tightening mandates throughout the fall due to the havoc they could wreak on Nevada’s tourism-based economy, said the trends led to an “inescapable conclusion.”

    “We are on a rapid trajectory that threatens to overwhelm our health care system, our frontline health workers, and your access to care. So it’s time to act,” said Sisolak, who recently contracted COVID-19.

    The new restrictions reduce the capacity limits for high-risk areas including restaurants, bars, gyms, places of worship and casinos.

    They will also be applied to public and private gatherings, which case investigators have identified as a major source of spread in Nevada. That includes on Thanksgiving, when home celebrations will be limited to no more than 10 people, from no more than two households.

    Despite the restrictions, Sisolak said he had no intention of becoming “the mask police.”

    Most businesses have operated at 50% since summer and the new restrictions reduce capacity limits to 25% or 50 people, whichever is less.

    That means large venues that normally accept thousands can only accept 50 people, while smaller restaurants and bars that normally accommodate fewer than 200 people will only be allowed to accept 25% of their total capacity.

    Sisolak took efforts not to frame the restrictions as any sort of shutdown and, instead, called them a “statewide pause.”

    During the pause, Nevada will also tighten its mask mandate, requiring all gym-goers and people who attend private gatherings to wear masks at all times when not eating.

    Sisolak said the new restrictions would tentatively be in effect for three weeks, at which time he planned to evaluate whether to tighten them further or relax them. Without improvement, he said Nevada could close restaurants for indoor dining, close gyms or implement further limits on gatherings.

    Health officials reported 2,155 confirmed cases on Sunday, increasing the statewide total to 133,888 since the onset of the pandemic. They also reported six additional deaths, bringing the known death toll to 2,017.

    In Nevada, 10% of all confirmed coronavirus cases have been reported in the last seven days and hospitals have filled to the point that one in Reno is setting up additional beds in an adjacent parking garage.

    Sisolak said every decision put before him had potentially negative effects on the economy, trajectory of the virus and schools. And Nevada’s heavy reliance on the tourism and hospitality industry only compounded the difficulty, he said.

    “Let’s be honest, our casinos, hotels, restaurants and bars are open with strict restrictions so that we can protect the economy,” he said.

    With vaccines on the horizon, Sisolak said he hoped Nevada could get the surge under control to avoid further closures.

    “There is a light at the end of this tunnel, and we are getting closer. But we don’t have a vaccine yet,” he said.

  6. #956
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://fox5sandiego.com/news/corona...irthday-party/

    ARLINGTON, Texas (KXAN) — Alexa Aragonez tells the Fort Worth Star-Telegram that her family discussed COVID-19 concerns before a recent party and decided they’d been careful enough.

    While the 26-year-old didn’t attend, she dropped off her 57-year-old mom at the birthday party, which included 11 other guests, including one pregnant cousin and four children.

    San Diego County reports 1,478 new COVID-19 cases, 6 deaths
    A few days later, Alexa’s mom Enriqueta began feeling sick, took a test and tested positive for coronavirus. Eventually, all 12 party guests tested positive.

    Enriqueta’s case was most severe: she spent one week and a day in the hospital. The other family members experienced mild symptoms, though some of the children developed strong coughs.

    “It’s scary to think that what if my entire family would have had the severe case and every single one of those 15 folks had to go to the hospital,” Alexa told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. “One, I would feel guilty for taking resources from people that really do need it, and two, I would be at risk of losing my entire family.”

    Alexa tested negative, but three more people — who were not at the party — were also infected due to guests who were.

    She says her family didn’t believe gathering with family was high-risk and that they’d all grown tired of not seeing each other as regularly as they normally do.

    Inside California’s curfew and enforcement decision
    Now, the family wants to get the message out to others: even if your family gatherings feel safe, it doesn’t mean they are. They’ve appeared in a video for the City of Arlington, expressing their regret for not listening to safety recommendations.

    “Now I’m in the hospital,” Enriqueta says sadly. “And I can’t see my family.”

    Alexa ends the video by urging residents: “Please, don’t be like my family and ignore the CDC guidelines. By staying apart, we can fight this virus together. The cure starts and ends with you.”

  7. #957
    Senior Member curiouscat's Avatar
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    This is what I don't want to happen to me this Thanksgiving.
    My husband has a large family and he plans to go over to his aunt's house (that usually hosts the big family gatherings) to see family and show off our son.
    I think my husband plans to not go inside and stay outside, but still. I don't want people coming up close to my child and trying to touch him.
    I think my husband knows people are going to try to touch him, because he said that we'd put gloves on him.
    If I'm forced to go over there. I'm going to wear a mask.
    My husband keeps saying that the mask only prevents you from spreading the coronavirus if you have it.
    I don't care. I believe it helps lessen the chance of you catching it if you're around someone that has it.
    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    "he had Skittles so he could have made drugs".
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    Yo mama such a ho, that Foursquare has made her vag a place to "check in".

  8. #958
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/11/23/b...-skeptics.html

    With coronavirus cases on the rise and communities returning to lockdown across the country, a marketing push is underway to persuade skeptical Americans to immunize themselves once vaccines are ready.

    The federal government, which has sent mixed messages about a pandemic that has caused more than 250,000 deaths nationwide, is not leading the charge. Instead, the private sector is backing a planned $50 million campaign to persuade people to protect themselves at a time when polls have suggested that more than 40 percent of adult Americans are not confident in a potential vaccine.

    The Ad Council, a nonprofit advertising group, led a similar effort in the 1950s, when it urged Americans to get vaccinated against polio. Its Covid-19 vaccination push will be one of the largest public education crusades in history, the group said. On Monday, the Ad Council will announce the new campaign and start testing messaging. It will start rolling out public service announcements across airwaves, publications and social media next year, when vaccines are expected to be approved and made available to the public.

    The White House has collaborated with the Ad Council on previous public health efforts, but it is not currently involved in this one.

    Frankly, this is the biggest public health crisis we?ve ever faced, and we don?t have time to waste,? said Lisa Sherman, the group?s chief executive. ?We?re working in advance, so that once those vaccines are proven to be safe and approved by all the right people, we?re ready to go.?

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    While the pharmaceutical companies Pfizer and Moderna have announced promising updates on the vaccines they are developing, President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. has blamed President Trump for causing anxiety about the safety of potential immunization efforts. Anti-vaccine sentiment has been growing for decades, driven in part by a backlash against pharmaceutical companies.

    Fifty-eight percent of American adults said they were willing to take a coronavirus vaccine, according to a Gallup poll conducted between Oct. 19 and Nov. 1. Another poll, conducted last month by Ipsos and the World Economic Forum, found that 85 percent of Chinese adults, 79 percent of British adults and 76 percent of Canadian adults planned to be vaccinated, compared to 64 percent of Americans.

    The Ad Council has joined with a coalition of experts known as the Covid Collaborative, which concluded through its own survey that only one-third of Americans plan to get vaccinated.

  9. #959
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    I don't care if they skip the vaccine. If someone is that stupid, let them skip it. Then I will get the vaccine quicker. I am done with these idiot anti vaxxers and people that think it's no worse than the flu.

  10. #960
    Senior Member puzzld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    I don't care if they skip the vaccine. If someone is that stupid, let them skip it. Then I will get the vaccine quicker. I am done with these idiot anti vaxxers and people that think it's no worse than the flu.
    The problem with that is this. It's quite possible the vaccine will only give immunity for a short time. More like a flu shot than say a measles or mumps shot. If those antivax idiots refuse to get shots and keep wandering around, asymptomatically spreading the Trump virus we'll either all have to get mutiple shots or will end up getting sick because MAGA Mike doesn't give a good god damn about anyone else.
    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    lol at Nestle being some vicious smiter, she's the nicest person on this site besides probably puzzld. Or at least the last person to resort to smiting.
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    Why on earth would I smite you when I can ban you?

  11. #961
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by puzzld View Post
    The problem with that is this. It's quite possible the vaccine will only give immunity for a short time. More like a flu shot than say a measles or mumps shot. If those antivax idiots refuse to get shots and keep wandering around, asymptomatically spreading the Trump virus we'll either all have to get mutiple shots or will end up getting sick because MAGA Mike doesn't give a good god damn about anyone else.
    https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/no-covid-19-casedemic/

    Ever since the COVID-19 pandemic reared its ugly head in China and then made its way to Europe and the rest of the world, conspiracy theorists have had a field day. Whether it was the idea that the 5G rollout in Wuhan, China somehow sparked or accelerated the COVID-19 outbreaks that evolved into the pandemic, that the influenza vaccine makes you more susceptible to COVID-19, or that COVID-19 was bioengineered in a laboratory and thus the pandemic is really a “plandemic” designed to control and subjugate the population (or even to depopulate the earth by over 90% so that elites, working with aliens—yes, aliens!—could exploit the population and its resources), conspiracy theories have been flowing fast and furious since early this year. Meanwhile, antivaxxers rapidly formed an unholy alliance with antimaskers, COVID-19 pandemic minimizers and deniers, and others opposing public health mandates to control the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 (including QAnon believers!) while infusing that movement with antivaccine pseudoscience and conspiracy theories and launching a pre-emptive disinformation war against COVID-19 vaccines. Antivax leader and propagandist Robert F. Kennedy, Jr has gone all-in on COVID-19 minimization/denial, and Del Bigtree, who made the antivaccine propaganda film VAXXED with Andrew Wakefield, has urged his listeners to “catch this cold” in order to build up herd immunity among the “healthy,” because, to him, COVID-19 is not dangerous except to those who deserve to be endangered, specifically those with chronic conditions due to overeating, lack of exercise, excess drink, and the like. It was blaming the victim at its most blatant, very typical of antivaccine activists.

    This brings me to the latest propaganda line being promoted by COVID-19 deniers and antivaxxers, that of the “casedemic”.

    What is the “casedemic”?
    What is a “casedemic”? Last week, ?ber-quack tycoon (worth over $100 million!) Joseph Mercola, DO published an article entitled “Asymptomatic ‘Casedemic’ Is a Perpetuation of Needless Fear“. Amusingly, Mercola prominently lists his article as having been “fact-checked”, to which I can only respond: “Fact-checked? You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.”

    Before I deconstruct Mercola’s claims, let’s take a moment to consider why “casedemic” has been a buzzword among COVID-19 deniers and antivaxxers lately. As of my writing this yesterday, COVID-19 is spreading out of control throughout huge swaths of the US, with the number of (known) cases hitting 12 million and the number of deaths surpassing a quarter of a million. Hospitalizations are climbing, and in large areas of the US, hospitals and the healthcare system are straining under the load of caring for so many COVID-19 patients. The situation is only getting worse, with hospitals in half the states facing massive staffing shortages, especially shortages of ICU nurses. In the face of such empirical numbers, it’s difficult to deny how severe the COVID-19 pandemic currently is in the US; that is, unless you find a way to redefine your terms. Enter the “casedemic”, in which antivaxxers and COVID-19 deniers try to claim that what we are seeing is an epidemic of positive tests, not of real disease, hence the term. Indeed, if you do a search of the term “casedemic”, you’ll find articles from the usual COVID-19 denying suspects arguing that the now-exponential increase in COVID-19 cases is not due to real disease, but rather an artifact of wider testing.

    Basically, “casedemic” is just a new name for an old COVID-19 denier trope, that increased testing explains the pandemic and that COVID-19 is not dangerous. Indeed, a Google Trends search shows that the term didn’t show up as Google searches until early August, but I’ve been as yet unable to figure out who coined the word: I think that might be the first instance of “casedemic” and that Ivor Cummings might well have been the person who coined the term, but I really don’t know for sure. Ivor Cummings, for those unfamiliar with him, is an engineer who decided he knew more about nutrition and health than actual, you know, nutritionists and physicians and had established himself as a nutrition quack under the title “Fat Emperor” long before COVID-19. Once the pandemic hit, he rapidly pivoted to become a COVID-19 grifter and has become hugely influential among the COVID-19 denial crowd. His shtick has been pretty much this, to claim that COVID-19 numbers are being vastly inflated due to increased testing and that it’s not that dangerous. Cummings rates a post of his own, and I’ve been meaning to do one discussing his pseudoscience about diet and COVID-10, but today is not the day for it.

    Here’s where antivaxxers glom on. After all, if COVID-19 is not dangerous, particularly if it’s not more dangerous than the flu, then there’s no need for masking, no need for social distancing, no need for public health interventions such as restricting activities known to be sources of spread (such as indoor dining at restaurants and having those who can work from home do so), and, above all, no need for a vaccine.

    Now let’s get back to Mercola. Mercola relies largely on a video by Del Bigtree. (It’s always a bad idea to use such an unreliable source, but if there’s one thing that Bigtree is skilled at, it’s crafting science-denying and antivaccine propaganda that sounds convincing to people who are not well versed in the relevant sciences.) I’m not going to embed it or link to it; it’s in the article if you really want to subject yourself to 23 minutes of Bigtree’s rambling. It also amuses me when someone who knows nothing about PCR pontificates about PCR, the way that Bigtree and Mercola do.






    Yes the COVID-19 Truthers and Anti-Vaxxers have a new conspiracy theory up their sleeve for political reasons Casedemic

  12. #962

  13. #963
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://ktla.com/news/coronavirus/mo...s-own-journey/

    Noubar Afeyan, an Armenian immigrant from Lebanon and grandson of a genocide survivor, is leading some of the breakthrough U.S. COVID-19 vaccine efforts as co-founder and chairman of Moderna Inc.

    Speaking with KTLA about the latest developments at Moderna, Afeyan highlighted how his journey as an immigrant has impacted his work.

    “One of the only unfortunate advantages Armenians have had by having gone through a genocide and having spread around the world is that we do have an experience of escaping and of immigrating and of constantly restarting,” he said. “That feeling of restarting … turns out, is very similar to what you need to have a startup of a company or to innovate.”

    Born in Lebanon, Afeyan’s family left in 1975 during the Lebanese Civil War and moved to Canada, where he grew up.

    “I hadn’t seen snow. I had never lived in North America,” he said. “That sudden change defined me down the line.”

    Afeyan studied chemical engineering at McGill University and later received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    In 2000, he started Flagship Pioneering to create and fund startups in health care and sustainability. Afeyan has since launched 40 other companies, including Moderna, which is based in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

    In early 2020, Moderna was tapped by the Trump administration to fast-track a COVID-19 vaccine. Through “Operation Warp Speed,” Moderna received nearly a billion dollars to develop the vaccine, and is promised another 1.5 billion to buy, manufacture and distribute the first 100 million doses — placing Afeyan’s company at the forefront of the battle against the coronavirus.

    “We hope that we will have sometime in December the approval to go ahead and start getting the first doses out in the U.S. as well as hopefully in Europe,” Afeyan said. “That’s where we stand, we’re very excited.”

    Moderna’s vaccine, officially named mRNA 1273, is nearly 95% effective, early data shows. And, it’s not like the traditional flu shot. The vaccine was developed through groundbreaking technology called Messenger RNA (mRNA).

    In January, scientists at Moderna and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) identified the sequence for a key protein on the surface of the virus called the spike protein. The genetic code of the virus is taken and administered into the body. Once it’s injected, it instructs cells to produce copies of the spike protein, triggering an immune response.

    Moderna was the first to invent the field of mRNA for therapeutics, even before the pandemic hit.

    “What’s remarkable is that the technology we have developed was perfectly suited for this type of very rapid deployment. And so within days, we had designed a new vaccine and started testing it,” Afeyan said, adding that it’s rapid but accurate.

    The vaccine has now been tested on 30,000 volunteers, and has shown promising results, according to the company. It requires two doses, four weeks apart. So far, side effects are mild, flu-like symptoms.

    “We don’t view this as a race,” Afeyan said. “There is one enemy … that’s the virus.”

    Afeyan says his goal is simply to help people, and he credited his drive and passion for philanthropy to his immigrant mentality.

    Moderna just wrapped up the third phase of clinical trials and is awaiting approval from the Federal Drug Administration. If all goes well, Moderna could administer 20 million vaccine doses before the end of the year.

  14. #964
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://abc7news.com/health/muni-ope...id-19/8243081/

    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Muni says one of its operators has died from the coronavirus.

    In a video announcement, the San Francisco transit agency did not release the person's name but said they had been on long-term leave. The head of Muni, Jeffrey Tumlin, added the person had not come into contact with anyone in months. Officials have not released details on how the operator contracted the virus.

    Since the pandemic started, nearly 100 Muni employees have tested positive. In nearly all cases, the employees experienced moderate symptoms, according to Muni.

  15. #965
    Senior Member of_corpse_not's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Queena View Post
    I'm not sure what you mean by exploited. My town is being hit hard, but I'm from Chicago. I lost my step father today, a friend yesterday, and my aunt lost 3 childhood friends. All within the past 72 hours. I know 6 people that have died and know of many more. I lost 2 cousins within 3 weeks. A childhood friend on her way to the hospital. This is devastating and I'm not sure how this country can recover, unless we shut completely down. I've never seen anything like this in my life. Not even during the 80s and 90s with AIDS. Please be safe.
    I am so sorry for your losses. That is so devastating. I can?t imagine. Hope you?re staying safe.

  16. #966
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.fiercebiotech.com/medtec...ement-covid-19


    As the COVID-19 pandemic has forced changes in the day-to-day care provided by many clinicians, many medtech companies have worked to adapt their products and programs toward these emergency practices that have become all too common.

    Seeing an opportunity to apply its artificial intelligence technology, GE Healthcare has launched a new algorithm that can read X-rays and help assess the correct placement of ventilator tubes in patients under critical care.

    “Today, clinicians are overwhelmed, experiencing mounting pressure as a result of an ever-increasing number of patients,” said Jan Makela, president and CEO of GE Healthcare’s imaging division.

    The company estimates that as many as one-in-four patients intubated outside of an emergency room may have a misplaced endotracheal tube, which can lead to severe, life-threatening complications such as over-inflating or collapsing a lung, or even cardiac arrest. Meanwhile, up to 45% of patients in intensive care units receive intubation connected to a ventilator.

    The AI program, included in GE Healthcare’s Critical Care Suite, is designed to live on the mobile X-ray scanner itself. It automatically detects the tube in chest X-ray images, provides measurements of its position within the windpipe on the scanner’s monitor, and helps flag and prioritize potentially dangerous cases.


    “The pandemic has proven what we already knew—that data, AI and connectivity are central to helping those on the front lines deliver intelligently efficient care,” Makela said, adding that these advancements will continue to have an impact after the pandemic subsides.

    The AI suite also includes algorithms focusing on improving the quality of the X-ray image, by noting field-of-view errors and automatically rotating the images to the correct orientation.

    https://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotec...un-to-approval

    Russia shocked the world in August when it approved a COVID-19 vaccine based on early data, leapfrogging global vaccine players like Pfizer and AstraZeneca. Now, the vaccine’s maker is reporting data from nearly 19,000 people showing it is more than 90% effective.

    The phase 3 study is testing the vaccine, developed by the state-backed Gamaleya Research Center, in 40,000 people. Dubbed Sputnik V after the Russian satellite that beat the U.S. into orbit during the space-race era, the vaccine is given in two doses three weeks apart. So far, more than 19,000 of the volunteers have received both doses.
    Preliminary data taken 42 days after the first shot—and 21 days after the second shot—showed the vaccine was more than 95% effective, the Gamaleya Center said in a statement Tuesday. A second analysis of more than 18,700 people done 28 days after the first dose—and a week after the second dose—found that the vaccine was 91.4% effective.

    So far, there were 39 cases of COVID-19, which triggered the analysis. Of the 14,095 people who received the vaccine, only eight, or 0.06%, developed COVID-19. As for the 4,699 people who received placebo, 31, or 0.66%, developed COVID-19.

    So far, there were no unexpected side effects, the Gamaleya Center said. Some of the vaccinated volunteers had short-lived side effects, such as pain at the injection site and flu-like symptoms including fever, weakness, fatigue and headache.

    The researchers will publish the interim data in a peer-reviewed journal, according to the statement. The investigators will carry out the next analysis when the study reaches 78 COVID-19 cases.

    RELATED: AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine 70% effective, shares fall

    Russia had approved the vaccine months ago, with less than two months of human testing and without having begun late-stage trials, Reuters reported at the time. The approval was based on “the equivalent of phase 1 data,” former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., tweeted in response to the news.

    Dismissing critics, Russia's president Vladimir Putin said on state TV the vaccine “works quite effectively, forms strong immunity, and, I repeat, it has passed all the needed checks,” as quoted by Reuters.

    The Sputnik V data come after Moderna, partners Pfizer and BioNTech, and AstraZeneca unveiled late-phase COVID-19 data. Moderna and Pfizer both hit efficacy numbers around 95%, while AstraZeneca’s vaccine was 70% effective. That 70% figure is the average of two dosing regimens—nearly 9,000 people in the study received the same dose for their first and second shots, while a smaller group of more than 2,700 people got a half dose to start, followed by a full booster shot. The latter regimen was 90% effective. But the relatively small number of people in that group make it hard to draw conclusions about the finding.

  17. #967
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.fiercebiotech.com/resear...omise-hamsters

    Single-domain antibodies, or “nanobodies,” inspired by llamas, have been proposed as potential treatments for COVID-19. Now, one company’s candidates have shown early promise in animal models.

    Two nanobodies developed by Twist Bioscience, dubbed TB202-3 and TB202-63, protected hamsters from weight loss—a key indicator of disease severity—after they were infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, the California biotech said.

    The protection against weight loss was comparable to that produced by plasma from COVID-19 survivors in previous preclinical studies, offering hope that the tiny antibodies could enable new approaches to treatment, prevention and diagnosis of COVID-19, Twist’s CEO Emily Leproust, Ph.D., said in a statement.

    With the positive hamster data, Twist Bioscience, a division of Twist Biopharma, is “considering various options, including licensing out the assets for further development,” a company spokesperson said in an email to Fierce BiotechResearch.

    Conventional antibodies consist of two immunoglobulin heavy chains and two light chains, with variable heavy and light domains that together give the antibodies their ability to target specific pathogens. By contrast, a nanobody only needs a single variable domain to recognize its target. Nanobodies occur naturally in llamas and other camelids.

    Twist chose TB202-63 and TB202-3 from large synthetic antibody libraries, each containing more than 10 billion single-domain antibody sequences. In lab dishes, the two nanobodies neutralized SARS-CoV-2 by binding to the virus’s spike protein receptor-binding domain, which is also the main target of the many other COVID-19 vaccines and monoclonal antibodies in development. During an infection, the spike protein binds to the ACE2 receptors on human cells to gain entry.

    RELATED: Twist Bioscience secures $140M plus a slew of new DNA partnerships

    In the preclinical studies, investigators at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) injected immunodeficient animals with the Twist nanobodies. At all three dosing levels—1 mg/kg, 5mg/kg and 10 mg/kg—the two nanobodies each protected treated rodents against weight loss. By contrast, animals that were infected with the coronavirus and not treated lost an average 11.7% of body weight.

    Because nanobodies are small, they can squeeze into small spaces and bind to antigen areas that would otherwise be inaccessible to human antibodies. Their size also allows for easier manufacturing scale-up.

    “[N]anobodies, with their very small size, may offer an advantage over traditional antibodies. For example, they could be delivered intranasally to prevent infection or reduce transmission; or they could be part of a more conventional therapeutic treatment regimen,” Jay Hooper, Ph.D., head of molecular virology at USAMRIID, said in a statement.

    RELATED: A COVID-19 treatment inspired by llamas

    Single-domain antibodies are being explored against various diseases, including infectious diseases and cancer. A team led by Scripps Research Institute previously isolated broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies from llamas that, when linked together into a multidomain antibody, protected mice against almost all influenza A and B viruses.

    When the COVID-19 pandemic started, scientists from the University of Texas at Austin, the National Institutes of Health and Ghent University in Belgium quickly pivoted their previous research focused on two related coronaviruses, SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV. They isolated a single-domain antibody from a llama immunized with the coronaviruses’ spike protein. By fusing it to a part of a human antibody, the candidate effectively neutralized SARS-CoV-2 in cell cultures.

    Twist believes that its candidates hold potential as “a preventive daily nasal spray that would block aerosolized particles of the SARS-CoV-2 virus from entering the nasal passage and therefore the body,” Leproust said in the statement.

    Twist also showed that a traditional antibody called TB181-36, which was discovered in collaboration with Vanderbilt University Medical Center, was also able to protect hamsters against weight loss at 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg doses. The company said it intends to move all three candidates forward for further testing either internally or with partners.

  18. #968
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.fiercebiotech.com/resear...omise-hamsters

    Single-domain antibodies, or ?nanobodies,? inspired by llamas, have been proposed as potential treatments for COVID-19. Now, one company?s candidates have shown early promise in animal models.

    Two nanobodies developed by Twist Bioscience, dubbed TB202-3 and TB202-63, protected hamsters from weight loss?a key indicator of disease severity?after they were infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, the California biotech said.

    The protection against weight loss was comparable to that produced by plasma from COVID-19 survivors in previous preclinical studies, offering hope that the tiny antibodies could enable new approaches to treatment, prevention and diagnosis of COVID-19, Twist?s CEO Emily Leproust, Ph.D., said in a statement.

    With the positive hamster data, Twist Bioscience, a division of Twist Biopharma, is ?considering various options, including licensing out the assets for further development,? a company spokesperson said in an email to Fierce BiotechResearch.

    Conventional antibodies consist of two immunoglobulin heavy chains and two light chains, with variable heavy and light domains that together give the antibodies their ability to target specific pathogens. By contrast, a nanobody only needs a single variable domain to recognize its target. Nanobodies occur naturally in llamas and other camelids.

    Twist chose TB202-63 and TB202-3 from large synthetic antibody libraries, each containing more than 10 billion single-domain antibody sequences. In lab dishes, the two nanobodies neutralized SARS-CoV-2 by binding to the virus?s spike protein receptor-binding domain, which is also the main target of the many other COVID-19 vaccines and monoclonal antibodies in development. During an infection, the spike protein binds to the ACE2 receptors on human cells to gain entry.

    RELATED: Twist Bioscience secures $140M plus a slew of new DNA partnerships

    In the preclinical studies, investigators at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) injected immunodeficient animals with the Twist nanobodies. At all three dosing levels?1 mg/kg, 5mg/kg and 10 mg/kg?the two nanobodies each protected treated rodents against weight loss. By contrast, animals that were infected with the coronavirus and not treated lost an average 11.7% of body weight.

    Because nanobodies are small, they can squeeze into small spaces and bind to antigen areas that would otherwise be inaccessible to human antibodies. Their size also allows for easier manufacturing scale-up.

    ?[N]anobodies, with their very small size, may offer an advantage over traditional antibodies. For example, they could be delivered intranasally to prevent infection or reduce transmission; or they could be part of a more conventional therapeutic treatment regimen,? Jay Hooper, Ph.D., head of molecular virology at USAMRIID, said in a statement.

    RELATED: A COVID-19 treatment inspired by llamas

    Single-domain antibodies are being explored against various diseases, including infectious diseases and cancer. A team led by Scripps Research Institute previously isolated broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies from llamas that, when linked together into a multidomain antibody, protected mice against almost all influenza A and B viruses.

    When the COVID-19 pandemic started, scientists from the University of Texas at Austin, the National Institutes of Health and Ghent University in Belgium quickly pivoted their previous research focused on two related coronaviruses, SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV. They isolated a single-domain antibody from a llama immunized with the coronaviruses? spike protein. By fusing it to a part of a human antibody, the candidate effectively neutralized SARS-CoV-2 in cell cultures.

    Twist believes that its candidates hold potential as ?a preventive daily nasal spray that would block aerosolized particles of the SARS-CoV-2 virus from entering the nasal passage and therefore the body,? Leproust said in the statement.

    Twist also showed that a traditional antibody called TB181-36, which was discovered in collaboration with Vanderbilt University Medical Center, was also able to protect hamsters against weight loss at 5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg doses. The company said it intends to move all three candidates forward for further testing either internally or with partners.

  19. #969
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.fiercebiotech.com/biotec...inese-approval

    BioNTech and Fosun Pharma have begun a phase 2 trial of their COVID-19 vaccine in China. The trial will generate data to support a filing for approval of the vaccine, which is nearing authorization in the West, in China.

    Fosun partnered with BioNTech in March in a deal worth up to $135 million. In July, Fosun advanced mRNA vaccine BNT162b1 into phase 1, only to follow BioNTech’s lead and prioritize another asset after getting a look at data from the global development program. The phase 2 trial will assess the performance of that second vaccine, BNT162b2, in the Chinese population.

    Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention will run the trial and recruit 960 people aged 18 to 85 years. Recruitment in the placebo-controlled trial will take place online. Three-quarters of participants will receive the vaccine.

    The primary endpoint is looking at humoral immune responses one month after the administration of the second dose of BNT162b2. Specifically, the investigators are interested in seroconversion rates and the geometric mean titer of SARS-CoV-2 serum neutralizing titers. Other endpoints are looking at the safety and tolerability of the vaccine seven and 14 days after each vaccination.

    Working with Pfizer, BioNTech has already generated a large body of data on the immune responses and adverse events seen in Western populations. The new phase 2 trial will show whether BNT162b2 performs comparably in Chinese people.

    Fosun has previously said a successful bridging study could enable it to extrapolate global data to the Chinese population, potentially setting it up to leverage BioNTech and Pfizer’s successful phase 3 to win approval in its home market. Fosun sees benefits to the study beyond the generation of results to support a filing for approval in China.

    “The phase 2 clinical study with BNT162b2 in China will not only provide key data for the launch of the vaccine in China, but also may play a positive role in the widespread promotion and use of the vaccine throughout Asia and around the world,” Aimin Hui, M.D., Ph.D., chief medical officer at Fosun, said in a statement.

    BNT162b2 is already on the cusp of approval, at least on an emergency basis, in the U.S., Canada, the EU and the U.K. on the strength of a phase 3 trial that found a 95% efficacy rate in stopping symptomatic COVID-19.

  20. #970

  21. #971
    Senior Member Angiebla's Avatar
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    One of my mom's friends has worked at the same local restaurant for 37 years. She was bartending one night, and saw some patrons walking around without masks. One of the customers was the owners son. She asked him to please put on a mask. He told her to leave, that she was fired. I would be so pissed if I were her.

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  22. #972
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    One of my mom's friends has worked at the same local restaurant for 37 years. She was bartending one night, and saw some patrons walking around without masks. One of the customers was the owners son. She asked him to please put on a mask. He told her to leave, that she was fired. I would be so pissed if I were her.
    Don't you guys have a mask mandate? I would be suing if I were her.

  23. #973
    Senior Member Angiebla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Don't you guys have a mask mandate? I would be suing if I were her.
    Thats the thing, we do. She has already been snagged up by another restaurant because shes such a good employee. I think shes moved on.

    There will be a massive walk out of waitresses at her former job though. People are pissed. More mad than her.

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  24. #974
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    Thats the thing, we do. She has already been snagged up by another restaurant because shes such a good employee. I think shes moved on.

    There will be a massive walk out of waitresses at her former job though. People are pissed. More mad than her.
    I would be super pissed. I hope that place can't find employees if they treat them like that.

  25. #975

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