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Thread: Historic WWII B17 Fortress "Nine O Nine" crashes at Bradley International Airport, CT, 7 killed

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    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Historic WWII B17 Fortress "Nine O Nine" crashes at Bradley International Airport, CT, 7 killed

    https://www.cnn.com/2019/10/02/us/co...rnd/index.html

    Seven people are dead after a World War II-era B-17 bomber crashed into an airport de-icing facility while trying to land at Bradley International Airport in Connecticut, officials said.
    The seven were on the plane, James Rovella, commissioner of the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, said at a news conference Wednesday evening.

    Six people on the plane survived. Rovella said he couldn't give names of the victims because not every family has been notified.
    Thirteen people -- 10 passengers and three crew members -- were on board when the vintage Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress crashed at the end of a runway, authorities said. One person on the ground was injured, Rovella said.

    Two firefighters were on board the plane, Simsbury Volunteer Fire Company Deputy Chief Kevin Kowalski said earlier. Kowalski would not provide names of the firefighters nor details on their conditions.

    According to our pilot a plane crash on the runway in Hartford has closed the airport and has everyone scrambling. pic.twitter.com/khAGbq50z5
    ? Aaron Katzman (@aaron_katzman) October 2, 2019

    The aircraft is civilian-registered and was not flown by the military at the time of the crash, the Federal Aviation Administration said.
    Pilot asked to return to the airport, audio indicates

    The B-17 waited a few minutes for turbulence from a prior aircraft to clear before it was cleared for takeoff, according to FAA air traffic control audio recorded by the website LiveATC.net.
    ATC: https://forums.liveatc.net/index.php...0;attach=10531



    http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/...rted-Dead.aspx

  2. #2
    Senior Member Angiebla's Avatar
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    How could anyone survive that crash?

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

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    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    How could anyone survive that crash?
    Yeah, I'm not sure either. I took my husband to see this plane a year and a half ago when it was on a display near our house. I will try to find my pics later and post them. I tried to get him to go up in it when we saw it, but he didn't want to spend that type of money on a short flight. It was really cool to see though. It really makes you think about the sacrifice the crew did during WWII for our freedom-It was a tiny little space to pack all those guys into and then expect them to shoot down enemy planes. I really don't know how any of them survived the war.

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    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...ities-n1062091

    A retired police captain and an insurance executive were among the seven killed when a vintage World War II bomber crashed near Hartford on Wednesday.

    "It is with deep sadness that I inform the Vernon Police Department, past and present, of the untimely death of retired Captain Gary Mazzone," Vernon police Chief James Kenny said in a statement.

    Mazzone, 66, had been on the job in Vernon between Aug. 2, 1976, and Sept. 23, 1998. After retiring from the Vernon police force, he worked as an inspector with the Connecticut Division of Criminal Justice, before retiring in January this year, according to Kenny.

    Mazzone had been volunteering with Special Olympics Connecticut for years, the department said.

    "He will be missed by his family, friends and coworkers," Kenny said. "Please keep Captain Mazzone and his family in your thoughts and prayers."

    Both the pilot and the co-pilot, Ernest McCauley, 75, and Michael Foster, 71, died when the B-17 made an emergency landing and exploded into flames at the Bradley International Airport, according to a list of victims from the Connecticut State Police.

    Jennifer Homendy of the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday that the pilots spoke to the control tower about five minutes after takeoff to report an engine issue. The World War II-era bomber crashed just three minutes later.

    The plane had an airworthiness inspection in January but the agency has yet to analyze the report. Homendy said that the NTSB will examine the engine as well as multiple other factors in its investigation.

    David Broderick, 56, James Roberts, 48, and Robert Rubner, 64, were also among those killed.

    Debra Riddell said her husband, Robert, 59, an insurance analyst from the town of East Granby, Connecticut, was among those killed.

    "It’s been a long and tragic day. Words cannot express how devastated I am," she wrote on Facebook. "At this point, all survivors have been identified. Rob was not one of them."

    Debra Riddell called her late husband the "best person I’ve ever known."

    "He was my soulmate. I will miss him beyond words can ever express," she said. "He loved his children more than anyone could know and the new grandson was the apple of his eye. He embraced my daughter and grandchildren and loved them as his own."
    Image: David K. LiDavid K. Li

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    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Robert Riddell's FB-His last post is a pic from inside the plane as they are taxing out. https://www.facebook.com/robert.riddell.96

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    https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/...m_medium=email



    The crash occurred shortly before 10 a.m. during a morning flight with paying passengers aboard, and brought a swarm of firefighters and other first responders to the scene. The state’s busiest commercial airport was closed for several hours.

    Details emerged over a series of press conferences about an ill-fated flight that struggled from the start, and ended with the historic bomber, one of few still airworthy, crumpled and on fire in a storage facility for deicing fluid some distance from the runway on which the crew had attempted to land. Airport workers and firefighters rushed to help survivors trapped in the burning wreckage.

    NTSB board member Jennifer Homendy addressed the media within hours after she reached the scene to become the public face of the agency's 10-member Go Team tasked with investigating the crash, which Homendy described as a "significant tragedy."

    "I am surprised that people survived," Homendy said. "I'm thankful of course, but of course, our hearts go out to those who lost their loved ones."

    Connecticut State Police released the names of the flight crew, passengers, and an airport worker who was injured on the ground on October 3.

    The pilot, Ernest "Mac" McCauley, 75, of Long Beach, California, was the most experienced B–17 pilot in the country, with 7,300 hours in the aircraft, Homendy reported at an October 3 press conference. McCauley also served as the organization's safety officer, and was eulogized on Facebook by his friend and fellow Collings Foundation pilot Eric Whyte as a former football player "who took pride in being a curmudgeon" and loved dogs enough to sneak away to animal shelters during tour stops and walk the dogs "since being on the road he couldn't have one of his own."

    Co-pilot Michael Foster, 71, of Jacksonville, Florida, also died in the crash. The third crewmember, Mitchell Melton of Dalhart, Texas, was injured and hospitalized after the accident.

    Two volunteer firefighters from the nearby town of Simsbury were among the 10 passengers, and one of them, Chief Master Sgt. James Traficante, 54, was identified October 3 as the Connecticut Air National Guard member who had brought his military-issue flame retardant gloves for the flight. According to the Hartford Courant, Traficante used those gloves to open the hatch and allow fellow passengers to escape the intense post-crash fire.

    “During the course of the next coming days you are going to hear about some heroic efforts of some of the individuals who were in and around that plane,” said James Rovella, the state's top public safety official, in a media briefing on October 2.

    The NTSB is seeking additional witness reports, and several witnesses told local media that the aircraft was flying low and appeared to have difficulty gaining altitude. The pilot requested a return to land very soon after takeoff, according to radio transmissions reported by local media including the Hartford Courant, and the tower diverted inbound flights to clear a path. The bomber's crew reported trouble with the "number four engine" and had requested a return to the airport to "blow it out."

    Homendy said October 3 that NTSB investigators plan to follow up on emailed witness statements that one or two of the bomber's four engines were seen being worked on prior to the flight.

    The B–17 landed short of Runway 6 and struck an approach light stanchion and veered right. Momentum carried it across the grass and into a final impact with a truck and a storage tank in the airport's deicing fluid storage facility, where two workers were present and one of them was injured.

    “Our thoughts and prayers are with those who were on that flight and we will be forever grateful to the heroic efforts of the first responders at Bradley Airport,” said Hunter Chaney, director of marketing for the Collings Foundation, in an email October 2. The nonprofit organization operates a fleet of vintage aircraft, touring the country and offering rides to help fund operations. “The Collings Foundation flight team is fully cooperating with officials to determine the cause of the crash of the Boeing B–17 Flying Fortress and will comment further when details become known.”

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    https://www.courant.com/breaking-new...h2e-story.html

    David Broderick, a victim of last week’s B-17 plane crash at Bradley International Airport, was remembered as a devoted husband and father and a dedicated employee of Collins Aerospace.

    According to his obituary, Broderick, 56, was a dedicated and driven employee at the aerospace company who frequently said: “When they get on board, I want to make sure I get them home safe."


    Broderick was one of the seven victims who died when a historic B-17 aircraft crashed at Bradley International Airport last week. On Oct. 2, the Collings Foundation’s World War II-era B-17 Flying Fortress crashed into an airport de-icing facility just minutes after takeoff.

    The crash sent up plumes of black smoke that could be seen for miles.

    According to his obituary, Broderick was a World War II enthusiast and regularly attended the meetings of the Western Massachusetts Military Collector’s Association.
    “David lived every day to the fullest and made the most out of every moment he had. His sparkling blue eyes, contagious laugh and smile will continue to live on in the hearts of those who hold him dear,” the obituary said.

    Broderick and his two sons, Joshua and Christopher, went on a “trip of a lifetime” following the 101st Airborne division’s footsteps from the beaches of Normandy, where the division was tasked with disabling German guns, to the Eagle’s Nest in Germany, where the “Screaming Eagles” captured Adolf Hitler’s famous Bavarian residence.

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    https://www.flyingmag.com/ntsb-colli...m_medium=email

    As the Collings Foundation’s crippled B-17, N93012, was approaching Runway 6 at Bradley Windsor Locks, Connecticut, a few weeks ago, the crew was already desperately pressed for altitude to try and align the World War II bomber with the runway for landing. Shortly after takeoff from Runway 6 just minutes before, the airplane never climbed above 500 feet agl before it began a return to the field with a mechanical problem reported in the number four engine. By the time the airplane was on downwind, its altitude had dropped to 300 feet. During the turn from base to final, the Boeing continued losing altitude, eventually striking the airport approach lights 1,000 feet short of the hard surface before it veered right and struck a number of vehicles, as well as a deicing fluid tank sitting 1,100 feet right of the runway threshold.

    We know that shortly after takeoff as the Boeing was turning crosswind, one of the pilots notified ATC that the airplane needed to return to the field. The approach controller asked the pilot if the aircraft required any assistance, to which the pilot responded, “No.” ATC cleared other aircraft out of the B-17’s path despite the seeming lack of urgency on the part of the crew.

    The NTSB's preliminary report of the B-17 accident published Tuesday said, "The wreckage came to rest upright and the majority of the cabin, cockpit, and right wing were consumed by postimpact fire." The report also confirmed the aircraft's landing gear was down, but that the approach was conducted with flaps up, possibly to minimize drag on the already damaged bomber.

    The two pilots on board, as well as five passengers, died in the crash, while five others on board were seriously injured. One person on the aircraft received minor injuries, as did one person on the ground. The Bradley weather that morning brought clear skies and calm winds to the region. The B-17 appears to have been operated as it has in the past as part of the Collings Foundation’s Wings of Freedom tour flights held around the U.S.

    During the initial forensic investigation, the NTSB inspector tested a fuel sample from both the B-17 and the line service truck that had added 160 gallons of 100LL before takeoff. Both smelled like avgas and neither tested positive for debris or water contamination. The NTSB’s investigation of the Boeing’s maintenance records seemed to confirm what most people believed anyway about how the Collings Foundation took care of its warbird fleet; with plenty of TLC. “The airplane was maintained under an airworthiness inspection program, which incorporated an annual inspection, and 25-hour, 50-hour, 75-hour, and 100-hour progressive inspections. Review of maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on January 16, 2019. At that time, the airframe had accumulated about 11,120 total hours of operation. Engine Nos. 1, 2, and 3 had 0 hours since major overhaul at that time. Engine No. 4 had 838.2 hours since major overhaul at that time. The airplane's most recent progressive inspection, which was the 100-hour inspection, was completed on September 23, 2019. At that time, the airplane had been operated about 268 hours since the annual inspection.”
    http://mydeathspace.com/article/2020...17_Nine_O_Nine
    Last edited by raisedbywolves; 12-31-2019 at 11:18 AM.

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