Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: The Second Look Act - Prisoner Pardons

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    4,147
    Rep Power
    0

    The Second Look Act - Prisoner Pardons

    https://patch.com/new-jersey/newarkn...en-booker-says

    NEWARK, NJ ? It's a chance to save U.S. taxpayers up to $16 billion a year. But according to Sen. Cory Booker, the Second Look Act is also an opportunity to give hundreds of thousands of people in prison something they desperately need? hope.

    On Monday, Booker ? the former mayor of Newark who represents New Jersey in the U.S. Senate ? announced that he and U.S. Rep. Karen Bass of California are introducing a bill that would give a "second look" to the sentences of inmates across the nation.

    Here's what the bill would do if it becomes law, according to Booker:

    Dealtown | Promotion
    Best Prime Day Deals 2019
    Laptops, TVs, Amazon devices, electronics, clothing, toys and more are all on sale for Amazon Prime Day 2019, so hurry up and shop!
    This is promotional content.
    People sentenced to more than 10 years imprisonment and who have served at least 10 years could petition a court to be released or have their sentences reduced. Factors for courts to consider would including whether a person "demonstrates a readiness for reentry," or if they no longer pose a danger to their community.
    A "rebuttable presumption of release" would be created for petitioners who are 50 years of age or older. The government would then have to prove why the person should remain behind bars.
    According to statistics from the Federal Bureau of Prisons, more than 82,000 people currently in federal prison have sentences longer than 10 years.

    The bill would also potentially impact about 250,000 inmates aged 50 and above, whose imprisonment costs U.S. taxpayers about $16 billion annually, Booker stated.

    For people like William Underwood, a 65-year-old Tenafly resident serving life without parole in New Jersey, the Second Look Act could mean the difference between dying in jail and greeting his family as a free man.

    According to Booker, Underwood ? a father of four and grandfather of three ? was convicted for a nonviolent drug crime he committed in 1988. He's since served more than 30 years behind bars, becoming a "model prisoner" with a pristine record.

    If convicted under the existing federal sentencing policies, Underwood would likely be at home with his family right now. But instead, he's a constant reminder of just how unfair the criminal justice system can be, Booker said.

    If it becomes law, the Second Look bill could be a candle that leads people like her father out of the darkness, said William Underwood's daughter, Ebony Underwood.

    "For 30 years, my siblings and I have held onto hope for our dad's freedom when freedom was never an option, but rather a hopeless dream," Underwood said. "This hope, instituted by our father, wasn't always vocalized, but rather expressed constantly through his actions despite prison walls."

    Underwood said it isn't only prisoners who suffer because of unfair laws; it's their families, too.

    "[The Second Look bill] gives a second opportunity to not only the incarcerated individual, but provides a second opportunity for their children and families to restore, repair, and renew those broken bonds that have been severely severed by such harsh, cruel, and unusual punishment, such as life without parole," Underwood stated.

    An online petition in favor of releasing Underwood has gained more than 80,000 signatures.

    As part of the petition, Ebony Underwood offers the following details about her father's arrest and imprisonment:

    "My Dad's name is William Underwood. He is a devoted father of four and a grandfather of three and a former music industry executive who promoted, managed and jumpstarted the careers of top R&B and pop stars of the 80s and 90s.

    "But he wasn't perfect and made mistakes by selling drugs before his music career. What originally was a way out of poverty when he was a teenager, and for so many others, eventually became a one-way ticket to prison. Prosecutors, hoping to get a lengthy sentence under the 1980's War on Drugs, painted him as being a part of a narcotics enterprise. Prior to his arrest, he had never been convicted of a felony.

    "Although he once was a part of the negativities of drug street life culture, he had positioned himself legitimately in the music industry as a highly regarded manager, publisher and advisor who was in constant demand by artists and labels requesting his work. Indeed, his involvement in criminal activity had ended years before his arrest, as evidenced by the fact that the FBI closed his case 'due to lack of activity.' However, 2 ? years later, in 1988, he was arrested and charged with a continuing leadership role in a narcotics conspiracy, despite being engaged in a full-time career in the music industry. In 1990, as part of the first round of drug convictions made under the newly enacted federal Sentencing Guidelines of 1987 and the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, he received three mandatory minimum sentences of 20 years on drug conspiracy charges plus, life without the possibility of parole. This was my dad's first and only felony conviction. The life without parole sentence was the result of a decision by the judge, not a jury."

    "Our bill targets a harsh reality," Booker said. "There are hundreds of thousands of people behind bars ? most of them people of color ? who were sentenced under draconian laws during the height of the War on Drugs that we have since recognized were unfair."

    "Our bill recognizes this unfairness and gives people who have served their time a 'second look,'" Booker said.

    Rep. Bass concurred that the bill is a way to counteract unfair sentences doled out during the War on Drugs and the "over-criminalization" of narcotics that took place in the 1980s.

    "Unjustifiably long prison sentences aren't just immoral, but also a waste of valuable federal resources," Bass said.

    Marc Mauer, executive director of The Sentencing Project, also lent support to the Second Look Act, writing that long prison sentences ? especially life in jail ? tend to incarcerate people into old age, long after the likelihood of criminal activity has passed.

    "Further, they add little deterrent effect on crime since deterrence is a function of the certainty of punishment, not its severity," Mauer said.

    The Second Look Act is one of several recent criminal justice reform laws proposed by Booker, who said his efforts have been partly inspired by his experience living and working in Newark.

    One of those pieces of legislation ? the First Step Act ? gained an unexpected supporter last year in President Donald Trump, who said "the whole nation benefits if former inmates are able to reenter society as productive, law-abiding citizens."

    See related article: Trump, Booker Find Common Ground On Criminal Justice Reform
    Mathew Charles, the first person released from federal custody under the First Step Act, has continued to fight for prisoner rights since returning home. He lent support to the Second Look bill on Monday.

    "People can and do change," Charles attested. "I have friends who are still incarcerated who are not the same people they were when they entered prison. This bill will make sure that people who have made significant strides towards rehabilitation in prison have an opportunity to return to society."

    Embedded video

    Sen. Cory Booker

    @SenBooker
    There are hundreds of thousands of people behind bars?most of them people of color?who were sentenced under draconian laws during the height of the War on Drugs that we have since recognized were unfair. But many of the changes we?ve made to these laws have not been retroactive.

    76
    8:17 AM - Jul 15, 2019
    44 people are talking about this
    Twitter Ads info and privacy
    Don't forget to visit the Patch Newark Facebook page. Learn more about posting announcements or events to your local Patch site. Send local news tips and correction requests to eric.kiefer@patch.com

  2. #2
    Senior Member Jumaki15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Columbiana County, Ohio
    Posts
    4,938
    Rep Power
    21474849
    Quote Originally Posted by KambingSociety View Post
    Holy fuck. You actually posted something that isn't total cancer.

  3. #3
    Moderator nestlequikie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Nunavut
    Posts
    10,058
    Rep Power
    21474860
    For people like William Underwood, a 65-year-old Tenafly resident serving life without parole in New Jersey, the Second Look Act could mean the difference between dying in jail and greeting his family as a free man.

    According to Booker, Underwood - a father of four and grandfather of three ? was convicted for a nonviolent drug crime he committed in 1988. He's since served more than 30 years behind bars, becoming a "model prisoner" with a pristine record.

    I hope Mr. Underwood gets his "Second Look".
    I hope that when the world comes to an end, I can breathe a sigh of relief, because there will be so much to look forward to. - Donnie Darko

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    4,147
    Rep Power
    0
    https://www.tennessean.com/story/new...19/1820393001/

    Cyntioa Brown 16 needs a second look and its in play.

    Cyntoia Brown will leave the Tennessee Prison for Women next week after serving 15 years of a life sentence for the 2004 murder of a Nashville real estate agent.

    She was 16 at the time of her crime. Earlier this year, former Gov. Bill Haslam took the rare step of commuting her sentence, paving the way for her Aug. 7 release.

    Brown is now a 31-year-old woman who has been institutionalized for more than half her life. Before she shot a stranger who picked her up at an east Nashville fast food restaurant one warm August evening, she spent two years in facilities operated by the Tennessee Department of Children's Services.

    In the years leading to her release, Brown's complicated story has served to rally celebrities and lawmakers, juvenile justice reformers and critics of Tennessee's unusually harsh life sentences for teens, those working to expose child sex trafficking and others highlighting racial inequities in the justice system. Brown is African American.

    Next week, Brown will finally have the chance to decide how to tell her own story, on her own terms. She declined through her attorneys to comment for this story.

    Her longtime inner circle — including her attorneys, friends and family — have also declined to comment, citing Brown's desire for privacy.

    Kate Watkins, Brown's college teacher and executive director of Lipscomb University's LIFE program, which brings college courses to women in prison, said Brown's upcoming release made her "thankful and grateful that this story is not going to be wasted, that this young, brave, passionate woman would take this pain and use it for the good of others."

    "It makes me so hopeful," she said "I am so confident in her, absolutely confident."

    Brown is not entirely a free woman. Under the terms of her release, she will report to a parole officer regularly for the next ten years. She must hold down a job, perform community service and participate in counseling.

    The crime
    Brown was sentenced to life in prison in the shooting death of 43-year-old Johnny Allen.

    Allen was found dead from a single shot to the back of his head. Brown has never denied pulling the trigger.

    Brown said she was sent by her then-24-year-old boyfriend and pimp to make money. According to Brown, Allen picked her up at a Nashville Sonic restaurant, bought her food and then took her to his home. She said he wanted to have sex with her, and intimidated her by pointing out the guns he owned and his experience as a military sharpshooter.

    Johnny Allen, 43, who was killed by Cyntoia Brown in 2004.Buy Photo
    Johnny Allen, 43, who was killed by Cyntoia Brown in 2004. (Photo: File | Tennessean)

    Brown shot Allen as he lay in bed, saying she feared he was reaching for a gun.

    Allen's father suffered a fatal heart attack shortly after his son's death. In a parole hearing last year, Allen's supporters placed the blame squarely on Brown for causing two deaths and noted Allen was no longer alive to tell his side of the story. They don't believe Allen propositioned Brown, only that he was trying to help her stay off the streets.

    At the age of 16, Brown was given a life sentence. In Tennessee, a sentence of life requires a minimum 51 years behind bars before being considered for parole. Tennessee has the longest minimum sentence in the country for teens and adults who receive a life sentence.

    Eight years later, in 2012, a U.S. Supreme Court ruling found sentencing juveniles to life in prison without the possibility of parole was unconstitutional.

    The ruling does not apply in Tennessee because a life sentence includes a possibility of parole after 51 years. Juvenile justice reformers call it a "virtual life sentence." At least 185 people are now serving life sentences in Tennessee prisons for felony murders committed as teens.

    Brown, officially known as inmate No. 00410593 behind bars, earned her associate's degree in 2015 and her bachelor's degree in the Tennessee Prison for Women in May.

    She has served as a mentor and advocate for women in prison, herding reluctant female inmates into college classes and leading efforts to bring in education programs for those with limited English, Watkins said.

    In part, Halsam cited Brown's academic work in prison as a factor in granting clemency, citing "the extraordinary steps Ms. Brown has taken to rebuild her life."

    In a statement issued after Haslam granted her clemency, Brown credited Watkins and others at Lipscomb for "opening a whole new world for me."

    Haslam also called Tennessee's sentencing laws requiring juveniles to serve at least 51 years "too harsh."

    Efforts in Tennessee to reform sentencing laws for children have thus far failed to pass the legislature for the past two consecutive years.

    A troubled childhood
    By 2004, Brown already had several brushes with Tennessee's criminal justice system.

    Raised in Clarksville by her adoptive mother, Brown was arrested for theft at the age of 12. She was placed in an alternative school system.

    Months later, she was charged with assaulting a teacher. Brown would spend more than a year at the now-defunct Woodland Hills detention center, which held youth convicted of felonies in a secure Nashville facility surrounded by fences and barbed wire.

    After her release, Brown returned home for a short time, attending Northwest High School before she ran away. In Nashville she met a 24-year-old man nicknamed "Kut Throat." Brown said he forced her to work as a prostitute, and physically and sexually abused her. The night she killed Allen, Kut Throat sent her out to make money by selling sex, Brown said.

    Sametria Hayes, a childhood friend who attended ninth grade with Brown, remembered her as a "normal kid," who was "a little reserved." Hayes has followed Brown's case but is no longer in touch with her. She remembers how shocked she felt as a teenager learning of her friend's arrest and conviction.

    "It was kind of shocking to me to know that a childhood friend could be sitting right next to you in class and could be a victim of sex trafficking," Hayes said.

    Hayes said Brown's story had opened her eyes to the plight of child sex trafficking. An amateur songwriter, Hayes wrote a song about sex trafficking and performed it at rallies demanding Brown's release.

    Circle of support
    In 2011, California-based filmmaker Dan Birman released the documentary "Me Facing Life: Cyntoia's Story," which chronicled Brown's transfer to adult court and her life in prison.

    The film received worldwide attention, including from Charles Bone, a prominent Nashville attorney whose practice focuses primarily on business law, negotiating mergers and acquisitions for high-profile companies.

    He agreed to represent Brown pro bono.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    4,147
    Rep Power
    0
    https://www.tennessean.com/story/new...19/1820393001/

    Cyntioa Brown should get full pardon.

    By then, Brown had a committed group of advocates. Kathy Sinback, one of Brown's original defense attorneys, now serves as administrator for Davidson County Juvenile Court. Sinback has visited Brown in prison every two weeks for years.

    Preston Shipp, a former state prosecutor who fought Brown's appeal then got to know her when he was a teacher in prison, has advocated on her behalf. Shipp has said that getting to know Brown in prison prompted him to make a career change, resigning as a prosecutor to work for the Board of Professional Responsibility.

    Juvenile Judge Sheila Calloway has also advocated on Brown's behalf.

    But Brown's legal appeals made little headway.

    In 2016, The Tennessean teamed with Birman and Independent Lens, the documentary arm of PBS, to produce "Sentencing Children," a seven-part series highlighting Brown's case and Tennessee's unusually harsh sentences for teens convicted of murder.

    A local television station also highlighted Brown's story.

    Celebrities took notice, too.

    "Did we somehow change the definition of #JUSTICE along the way??" superstar singer Rihanna wrote on her Instagram page. "Cause..... Something is horribly wrong when the system enables these rapists and the victim is thrown away for life! To each of you responsible for this child's sentence I hope to God you don't have children, because this could be your daughter being punished ..."

    Brown's story exploded on social media, with other celebrities including Kim Kardashian West and LeBron James speaking out on her behalf. Hundreds of thousands of people retweeted and responded, signed petitions and contacted the office of former Gov. Bill Haslam.

    The public outcry focused largely on the role of sex trafficking in Brown's case. When she was convicted in 2005, minors could still be convicted on prostitution charges. Brown's case became a rallying cry in the age or #MeToo for justice for teenage victims of sex trafficking.

    The national attention did not persuade all members of the state Board of Parole, which split on its recommendation to the governor over granting Brown parole in 2018.

    Freedom approaches
    In January, Brown was sitting in the prison's visiting room when her lawyers walked in with the life-changing news.

    "You're getting out in August," Bone said as soon as he saw her.

    Her reaction was immediate.

    "She just lit up with a joy I've never seen before," Sinback said.

    A member of the legal team asked Brown if she was disappointed it would take another seven months before she was free.

    "She said, 'Are you crazy? I was supposed to get out when I was 67 years old,'" Sinback said.

    Tennessee's sentencing laws
    For first-degree murder, there are three sentencing options that apply equally to adults and children tried as adults: the death penalty, life in prison with no possibility of parole, and life with the possibility of parole.
    In 1995, Tennessee lawmakers adopted a "Truth in Sentencing" law that established a 51-year minimum sentence for those facing life with the possibility of parole. It is the longest in the nation.
    In total, 185 juvenile offenders are serving life sentences in Tennessee. Of those, 120 are serving time for crimes committed after 1995, when lawmakers lengthened the minimum sentence. Those convicted before the 1995 law have parole dates that vary from 25 years to 30 years post-conviction.
    Doing stories that make our community better takes times and resources. A Tennessean subscription gives you unlimited access to stories that make a difference in your life and the lives of those around you. You also get the ability to tap into news from the USA TODAY Network's 109 local sites.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    4,147
    Rep Power
    0
    https://www.kron4.com/news/cyntoia-b...son-wednesday/

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — The woman who was granted clemency from former Tennessee governor Bill Haslam will be released from prison Wednesday.

    Cyntoia Brown will be released to parole supervision on Aug. 7, exactly 15 years to the day when she was arrested in 2004.

    In preparation for her release, Brown met with counselors at the Tennessee Prison for Women to design a reentry plan, according to the Tennessee Department of Correction. The plan reportedly includes an updated risk/needs assessment, placement in the transition center and continuing her current course of study through the Lipscomb University LIFE Program.

    Her parole supervision will continue until August 7, 2029.

    Brown released a statement prior to her release, which reads:

    “While first giving honor to God who made all of this possible, I would also like to thank my many supporters who have spoken on my behalf and prayed for me. I’m blessed to have a very supportive family and friends to support me in the days to come. I look forward to using my experiences to help other women and girls suffering abuse and exploitation. I thank Governor and First Lady Haslam for their vote of confidence in me and with the Lord’s help I will make them as well as the rest of my supporters proud. “

    Haslam granted clemency to Brown just days before leaving office on Jan. 7, 2019.

    Shortly after announcing his decision, Haslam said during a fundraiser that his clemency for Brown was “the right thing to do.”

    Brown was 16 when she was sentenced to life in prison for murdering a Nashville man in 2004.

    Gov. Haslam said his decision to grant Brown clemency comes after “careful consideration of what is a tragic and complex case.”

    Brown was reportedly trapped in prostitution and a victim of child sex trafficking at the time when she shot and killed Jimmy Allen.

    Allen picked up the then 16-year-old at the Sonic on Murfreesboro Pike and brought her home.

    The two got into bed together and at some point, Brown killed Allen. She claimed self-defense, but prosecutors maintained that Brown killed the 43-year-old real estate agent in order to rob him.

    “There is nothing I can say. There is nothing to justify what I did,” Brown previously said.

    “Cyntoia Brown committed, by her own admission, a horrific crime at the age of 16. Yet, imposing a life sentence on a juvenile that would require her to serve at least 51 years before even being eligible for parole consideration is too harsh, especially in light of the extraordinary steps Ms. Brown has taken to rebuild her life. Transformation should be accompanied by hope. So, I am commuting Ms. Brown’s sentence, subject to certain conditions,” Haslam said.

    Brown released a statement shortly after the governor’s decision writing in part, “Thank you, Gov. Haslam for your act of mercy in giving me a second chance. I will do everything I can to justify your faith in me.”

    The statement continued, “I am thankful for all the support, prayers and encouragement I have received. We truly serve a God of second chances and new beginnings. The Lord has held my hand this whole time and I would have never made it without Him. Let today be a testament to His saving grace… With God’s help, I am committed to live the rest of my life helping others, especially young people. My hope is to help other young girls avoid ending up where I have been.”
    This person should get a full pardon

  7. #7
    Senior Member Jumaki15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Columbiana County, Ohio
    Posts
    4,938
    Rep Power
    21474849
    Quote Originally Posted by KambingSociety View Post
    https://www.kron4.com/news/cyntoia-b...son-wednesday/



    This person should get a full pardon
    No, they shouldn't.

  8. #8

  9. #9
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    18,002
    Rep Power
    21474863
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnLanders View Post
    https://www.change.org/p/masha-grant...life-sentences


    https://www.change.org/p/leslie-abra...dez-brothers/c

    Now there are groups that want the Menendez Brothers to be free from prison. That is something to be considered
    No, it shouldn't be. They murdered their parents in cold blood. They had plenty of money and other options to get away, even if there was abuse going on. They didn't have to do what they did.

  10. #10
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    4,030
    Rep Power
    6827563
    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    No, it shouldn't be. They murdered their parents in cold blood. They had plenty of money and other options to get away, even if there was abuse going on. They didn't have to do what they did.
    I don't agree with the group but I agree that if they were free at some point they will end up abusing their spouses and the "Cycle of Abuse" will continue.

  11. #11
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    4,030
    Rep Power
    6827563
    https://www.fox5vegas.com/news/us_wo...faf494f73.html

    (CNN) -- In a stunning reprieve for a man sentenced to more than five centuries behind bars for a nonviolent offense, a judge in Los Angeles on Thursday summarily slashed his sentence to time served and ordered his immediate release.

    Juan Carlos Seresi, a convicted money launderer whose projected release date from the federal Bureau of Prisons had been July 8, 2419, was suddenly ordered to be freed "without delay" by U.S. District Court Judge Stephen V. Wilson. Once out, Seresi will be subject to a three-year term of supervised release, according to Wilson's order.

    "It's a miracle," Seresi said after hearing the news from his daughter, Patti Mawer, she told CNN. Mawer, 46, said her father has been behind bars since she was a teenager, but has remained an integral part of her family's life.

    "After all this praying and all this hoping, he can't believe it," Mawer added.

    Seresi, 73, was one of four defendants sentenced to 505 years behind bars in 1991 for laundering cocaine cartel cash who were featured in a CNN report published in August. The article noted how the sentences were considered harsh even back then and represent the sort of draconian punishment that has since been widely condemned amid a national conversation around justice reform.

    When the case was before Wilson in August, he denied a request by prosecutors to overturn the men's convictions "in the interests of justice" due to special treatment given to a government witness by FBI agents that was not disclosed to the defense. Wilson conducted a months-long review into the matter and concluded that the men's convictions were sufficiently supported by evidence and testimony unrelated to that particular witness.

    All four defendants filed an appeal with the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which is pending.

    But Seresi's attorneys also filed a motion seeking his release on compassionate grounds, due in part to his advanced age and a diagnosis of high blood pressure making him susceptible to serious complications from Covid-19. Prosecutors in the US Attorney's Office in Los Angeles did not oppose the motion.

    While Wilson found that those factors alone did not entitle Seresi to early release, he noted other factors that — taken together — amounted to "extraordinary and compelling reasons" for granting his freedom.

    Seresi was convicted of a nonviolent offense, had already served more than 30 years behind bars, earned three associate degrees while incarcerated and had a near spotless disciplinary record, the judge noted.

    "The Court's findings should not be construed to minimize the severity of the Defendant's conduct," Wilson wrote, noting that Seresi was "a key employee of the ringleaders of a substantial money laundering conspiracy."

    Wilson wrote that he was ordering the release under a "catch all" provision of federal law that, in his view, allowed him to consider a wide variety of factors concerning Seresi's continued imprisonment.

    "Very few cases will fall within that provision," Wilson wrote. "Most will not."

    "We are so happy for Juan Carlos and his beautiful family," said Reuven Cohen, one of Seresi's lawyers, whose firm took the case on a pro bono basis.

    Seresi, along with brothers Vahe and Nazareth Andonian and Raul Vivas, were convicted of helping to launder more than $300 million in drug cartel money through their precious metal and money exchange companies. Seresi, considered the least culpable of the defendants by the sentencing judge, worked as an employee of Vivas.

    None of the men was convicted of direct involvement in the massive cocaine distribution ring at the center of the case.

    Following their sentences, the men languished in prison for decades as one appeal after another was denied.

    But last year they got what seemed like an extraordinary break when federal prosecutors sided with the defense in seeking to have their convictions overturned based on special treatment given to a key government witness by the name of Sergio Hochman.

    Hochman, a co-conspirator in the drug and money laundering case who cut an early deal with the government, disclosed decades later that agents treated him to a handcuff-free seaside lunch in Malibu and allowed him visits with his wife in the backseat of a car and in her apartment in Tucson, AZ.

    The benefits were not disclosed to the defense. Prosecutors confirmed the information with Seresi's FBI handlers and ultimately concluded the information was sufficiently damaging to warrant throwing out the case.

    Wilson, however, launched his own inquiry, which included a review of thousands of pages of documents from the trial.

    He issued a 32-page ruling in August denying the prosecution's request to overturn the convictions.

    Wilson said he found that Hochman's testimony had been "helpful" to the government, but "not critical."

    "It's not enough that the government's case would be slightly weaker without Hochman," he wrote.

    Attorney Jerry Newton, who represents Vahe Andonian, praised Wilson's decision to grant Seresi early release and said he believed the Andonian brothers were similarly strong candidates for such mercy. He said he intends to file a similar motion in front of Wilson while their appeal is pending in the 9th Circuit.

    "They're essentially around the same age. They've spent 31 years in prison without one incident. They've taken every educational course they could get their hands on," Newton said. "It's a fair and just result to let them enjoy the remainder of their lives outside of prison."

  12. #12
    Senior Member Queena's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Illinois but the Southern part, which kind of sucks
    Posts
    2,544
    Rep Power
    21474846
    I don't know about Cyntonia Brown getting pardon. She did that shit. Drug dealers should be pardon. The government is upset because someone was making more money selling drugs than they make. Pardons should be given on a case by case basis.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Angiebla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    11,574
    Rep Power
    21474855
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnLanders View Post
    https://www.change.org/p/masha-grant...life-sentences


    https://www.change.org/p/leslie-abra...dez-brothers/c


    Now there are groups that want the Menendez Brothers to be free from prison. That is something to be considered


    Quote Originally Posted by Queena View Post
    I don't know about Cyntonia Brown getting pardon. She did that shit. Drug dealers should be pardon. The government is upset because someone was making more money selling drugs than they make. Pardons should be given on a case by case basis.
    Yeah I dont think she should be pardoned. If she killed the "pimp" to escape then maybe I might reconsider, but she killed a john.

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  14. #14
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    4,030
    Rep Power
    6827563
    https://fox40.com/news/national-and-...d-from-prison/

    FORT LAUDERDALE, Florida (AP) — Richard DeLisi is a free man after serving 31 years of a 90-year sentence for selling cannabis.

    The 71-year-old walked out of a Florida prison Tuesday saying he’s not bitter about the lost years and prefers to focus on creating memories with his family.

    According to The Last Prisoner Project, DeLisi was believed to have been the longest-serving nonviolent cannabis prisoner.

    He was sentenced to 90 years in 1989 at the age of 40.

    While he was in prison, his wife, parents and 23-year-old son all died.

    On Tuesday, he met two granddaughters for the first time and ate at his favorite crab restaurant.

    Congrats to Richard DeLisi but at the same time its hollow too given that he has lost family members and also have grandchildren he never knew about when he was in prison. All this for Pot even though in the 30 years hes been away pot has been debated and became legal in some states.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •