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Thread: Parvo Virus Outbreak 2019 thread

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    Parvo Virus Outbreak 2019 thread

    https://www.abc15.com/news/region-ph...-and-distemper

    PHOENIX ? Maricopa County has placed its east shelter under quarantine as the shelter continues to respond to illness outbreaks.

    Wednesday, spokesperson Jose Santiago said MCACC East had been placed under a two-week quarantine after three dogs tested positive for canine distemper and others showed symptoms of upper respiratory infections.

    The decision closes the shelter near Rio Salado Parkway and the Loop 101 to all adoptions. All dogs at the shelter will be unavailable for adoption until they have been re-vaccinated and are confirmed to be healthy, Santiago said.

    The announcement of the quarantine comes one day after the county announced restrictions at its two shelters due to outbreaks of two diseases that are contagious to dogs. Those restrictions are still in place at the west shelter, according to Santiago.

    Maricopa County Animal Care and Control said Tuesday that cases of canine parvovirus (commonly called parvo) and distemper have increased recently, leading officials to cut back the contact dogs in the shelter have with the outside world to prevent the infections from spreading.

    The limits still in place at the shelter near 27th Avenue and Lower Buckeye includes a suspension of owner surrenders through June 11. Staff are contacting those who had scheduled appointments to surrender their animals and providing them with alternate options.

    Dog-to-dog 'meet and greets' between shelter dogs and those looking to adopt who already have pets at home have been suspended for 30 days. Owners bringing a new dog home will be advised to quarantine their pet from their current animals and slowly introduce them to each other. Officials say this suspension will prevent the potential for parvo or distemper to spread to the owned pet or those looking to be adopted.

    The county has also temporarily ended public dog walks, where people can come and help shelter pets stretch their paws on walks in the neighborhoods around the shelters.

    Parvo and distemper are both highly-contagious viruses that infect dogs through dog-to-dog contact or contact with infected feces or surfaces, such as a shared water bowl. Parvo infects the gastrointestinal tract and symptoms include loss of appetite, diarrhea and vomiting. It can cause death within 48 or 72 hours after symptoms start, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association. No specific drug exists to eliminate the infection, so treatment focuses on boosting the dog's own immune system to fight off the virus.

    Distemper infects the respiratory and nervous systems, in addition to dogs' GI tract. It can be spread through the air when an infected dog coughs or sneezes, according to the AVMA. Dogs infected with distemper can spread the infection for months. Symptoms include a watery discharge from the eyes, fever and vomiting. As the disease progresses to the nervous system, dogs begin exhibiting circling behavior, head tilts and seizures.

    Vaccinations are available for both parvo and distemper, making puppies too young to be vaccinated the most at risk from the diseases.
    Its not just the measles thats getting the outbreak attention though. Now your pets have to watch out for Parvo.

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    https://www.wthitv.com/content/news/...510829491.html

    BRAZIL, Ind. (WTHI) - Animal experts in the Wabash Valley say they are on high alert.

    That's as the number of dogs with the parvo-virus infection has risen.

    News 10 spoke with leaders at the Clay County Humane Society.

    They told us this year alone...seven dogs have died in connection to this virus. Last year...no dogs died of this infection.

    So far, the shelter has seen at least 20 cases this year.

    On Tuesday alone, the shelter took about 10 calls dealing with the infection.

    Symptoms include lethargy, loss of appetite, and vomiting.

    Health experts say most deaths occur within 48 to 72 hours of the first symptoms.

    Pet owners should be sure vaccinations are up to date.

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    https://fox2now.com/2019/05/28/stray...n-rescue-dogs/

    ST. LOUIS – Local dogs like Princess, Emma, Mayhem, and Pepper have been suffering from a parvo infection.

    Parvo is highly contagious and can kill dogs. While there’s no known cure for the virus, owners can treat the symptoms, which include vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration.

    Without treatment, dogs can become septic and die.

    “Anytime they get exposed it’s through feces or throw-up when they vomit,” said Jennie Miller, Stray Paws Rescue.

    Miller said the only real way to prevent parvo is to get your dogs vaccinated. However, she said they’re now seeing puppies that have been vaccinated come down with parvo.

    “For some reason over the past three years, parvo has been more prominent now,” Miller said.

    Stray Paws Rescue said everybody needs to vaccinate their dogs and that’s not all.

    “Don’t take your dog, don’t take your puppy to places where dogs are going until you know they have a good immune system,” Miller said, adding that owners may want to wait up to a year before introducing their pet to other dogs.

    Stray Paws has been fighting the good fight but is out of money.

    “Unfortunately, we do need funds to totally operate,” Miller said. “All our money has gone to the parvo pups.”

    Of the eight dogs treated at Stray Paws Rescue, five have shown no signs of infection and have been placed in foster homes. However, the other three dogs were not symptom-free but Stray Paws ran out of money and the foster homes took them in any way.

    Stray Paws Rescue helped rescue several dogs from parvo back in December thanks to donations from the public.

    You can make donations to Stray Paws via PayPal.

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    https://news3lv.com/news/local/las-v...ous-parvovirus

    LAS VEGAS (KSNV) — Valley veterinarians have an urgent warning for all dog owners.

    They are seeing more and more cases of dogs infected with the highly contagious parvo virus.

    The potentially deadly disease spreads quickly from dog to dog, but it’s preventable with vaccinations.

    The virus is showing up the Animal Foundation and local animal hospitals.

    Dogs can pick it up at parks while out on a walk. The virus can survive on clothing, skin and in the environment for at least a year.

    Dr. Taylor Parker is a veterinarian at Lone Mountain Animal Hospital.

    “We are starting to see an influx in parvo cases. Parvo is extremely terrible for the animal. They can die from this disease,” said Dr. Taylor Parker. “They come in, people don’t know what’s going on, and then two days later, their dog could be dead."

    The highly contagious virus is spread through dog feces at places like dog parks.

    “Even just walking around in the street where other dogs are. We’ve seen a lot of issues with apartment complexes,” explained Dr. Parker.

    Dr. Parker said another concern is people who buy a dog online and don’t ask for records, assuming it's up to date on shots.

    “If you do not have records from a veterinarian, you cannot prove that the dog was vaccinated,” said Dr. Parker.

    “Breeders who sell on Craigslist or other sites, may say the dog was vaccinated, but it’s not done right or not done,” she continued.

    Over at the Animal Foundation, Dr. Ken Sieranski sees a handful of parvo cases each day.

    “The number of cases coming through the door shows us there’s more of this virus out there in the community,” said Dr. Ken Sieranski.

    Dr. Sieranski said there are certain symptoms to look for in your dog.

    “They can have signs of vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, all the way up into death,” he explained.

    The only way to stop the spread of the virus is to vaccinate your dogs.

    “It’s a very preventable disease so it’s really, really important for people to vaccinate their puppies and adult dogs,” said Dr. Sieranski.

    Dr. Parker said parvo can be treated if caught early, but it’s expensive.

    “For hospitalization, we’re looking at 1,000 for three days of hospitalization with the number of fluids and medications they require,” noted Dr. Parker.

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    https://www.freep.com/story/news/loc...er/1367902001/

    Ann Arbor is seeing a significant number of wild animals infected with two diseases that can be deadly for household pets.

    The Humane Society of Huron Valley is warning Washtenaw County residents that cases of parvovirus and distemper, which can affect a variety of canines, are significantly up in the area this year.

    The society reports a 45 percent uptick in sick wildlife in 2019. It also reports an increase in dogs with parvovirus, commonly known as parvo, visiting its vet clinic.

    Parvo and distemper can both be fatal for pets and wildlife. When Youngstown, Ohio, had a distemper outbreak last year, residents reported “zombie-like” raccoons walking around on their hind legs and baring their teeth during the day. Fourteen raccoons were put down after police were called to handle them.

    Simple steps and education can protect your pets from both viruses.

    Could my pet be affected?
    The diseases mainly affect dogs, but can include raccoons, skunks, coyotes, foxes and more.

    Dogs under four months old and unvaccinated dogs are most at risk for both diseases, but cats can also get certain strains of the viruses, according to the humane society.

    Distemper is a viral infection, and can spread through the air, or through urine or feces. Parvo, also a virus, can spread through contact with other parvo-infected animals or their bodily fluids, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association.

    What can I do to protect my cats and dogs?
    Pets should be vaccinated to protect from parvo and distemper. Both vaccines are standard core vaccines at the vet, and should be kept up to date throughout your pet’s life, according to the humane society.

    Practicing good pet hygiene is helpful in preventing both diseases, since they can spread through contact with infected animals or their feces. Disinfectants can kill distemper, so regular cleaning helps, too.

    Proper pet hydration is also key, since both viruses can cause dehydration.

    Could I get parvo or distemper?
    Animal parvo can't be transmitted to humans. Humans can be infected with distemper, but it won’t affect your health at all. You can be a carrier for the disease and it could infect your pet. Pet vaccination is the best way to stop it spreading.

    How will I know if my pet has parvo or distemper?
    Parvo symptoms strike quickly, and can include severe diarrhea and vomiting, lethargy, bloating or abdominal pain, hypothermia or fever. The American Veterinary Medical Association recommends reaching out to your vet immediately if you suspect your pup may have parvo, since deaths can occur as soon as 48 hours after exposure.

    Distemper brings the same symptoms, but can also have neurological effects like stumbling, head tilts, circling behavior, tremors, seizures or paralysis, according to the humane society. Pet owners should also call their vet if their animal is displaying distemper symptoms.

    What should I do if I find a sick animal?
    If you see an animal in the Washtenaw County area that you think may be infected, the humane society is asking that you call its rescue department at 734-661-3512.

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    https://www.ktbs.com/news/arklatex-i...6f4e25bb9.html

    SHREVEPORT, La. – It took two veterinarians and $3,000 to save Snickers’ life. Desiree Sendelbach, a volunteer with Key to Happiness Rescue in Shreveport, said the now-healthy six-month-old puppy was nearly killed by the canine parvovirus.

    "It's so horrible. It destroys their insides, and it's everywhere," Sendelbach said.


    Sendelbach said she has encountered, at the very least, ten puppies with parvo this year.

    "I lose count because I go through the whole thing with them,” Sendelbach said. “Sometimes I forget a little bit because we lose them and it's painful."

    While parvo typically spikes during the warmer months, Sendelbach, who has been involved in dog rescue for most of her life, said this is becoming the worst uptick in parvo she's ever seen.

    “It's bad. It's really, really bad," she said.

    Key to Happiness is a foster-based rescue, which focuses on finding temporary homes for dogs until they are adopted. Sendelbach said saving sick puppies puts a strain on the generosity of the most reliable donors, who typically help pay for food and transportation. Now, she has to ask them to help foot four-figure vet bills.

    DeSoto Shelter Sign.jpg
    "It happens pretty quickly, and within a day, you're going to have the animal essentially crashing,” said Connie Philipp, Director of DeSoto Parish Animal Services. “You've got the animal laying down and lethargic, they're nauseous, they'll start out with diarrhea but then you'll start seeing blood in it because their (gastrointestinal) tract is really insulted by this virus."

    A sign now hangs on the front door of the parish animal shelter. It says, “At this time we are not accepting anymore (sic) dogs! We are at full capacity!”

    Philipp said she can’t take any more dogs because parvo has forced her and the staff to keep puppies in their care for longer periods of time.


    “I’ve changed the protocol for adoption. (Parvo) would manifest anywhere from five to ten days after their first vaccine. Now we’ve seen situations where it’s manifesting five to ten days after their second vaccine,” Philipp said. “I’ve made it a new guideline around here that we’re not going to adopt puppies out until five to ten days after their third vaccination, when they should be fully covered at that point.”

    Philipp said warm weather and a rainy spring have only helped the virus spread, so until the outbreak of parvo dies down, she is not taking any chances.

    "One thing I've added is foot baths in front of each of the puppy stalls, so that the staff disinfect their feet going in and out of the puppy rooms," Philipp said.

    While it could cost hundreds or thousands of dollars to save a puppy with parvo, Philipp points to a much cheaper option.

    "Vaccinate your animals. There are low-cost clinics that can help you out with that, and nobody wants to see these beautiful babies suffer," Philipp said.

    Veterinarians recommend puppies get three to four parvo shots, with the last one administered when the puppy is at least 17 weeks old. Since the virus is spread through fecal matter, it' best to keep puppies away from high-traffic areas, like dog parks, until they're fully vaccinated.

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    https://www.wjhl.com/local/update-5-...rvo/2043855594

    BLOUNTVILLE, Tenn. (WJHL) - Officials with the Sullivan County Animal Shelter say five dogs have now been put down due to an outbreak of parvovirus.

    On Monday, the shelter confirmed two dogs had tested positive for parvo and announced the shelter would remain closed through Monday, June 3.

    News Channel 11 first learned of the outbreak last week.

    As long as there are no new cases over the weekend, the shelter will reopen on Monday according to shelter manager Peter Hanson.

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    Senior Member Angiebla's Avatar
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    I used to work in a clinic that would treat parvo patients. We would see at least 10 dogs parvo positive in a day. It’s extremely contagious and can live on surfaces for awhile.

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    I used to work in a clinic that would treat parvo patients. We would see at least 10 dogs parvo positive in a day. It’s extremely contagious and can live on surfaces for awhile.
    I had no idea that there was another outbreak until now given that all of the nation attention has been focused on Measles.

    ANN ARBOR, MI -- There’s been a roughly 45 percent increase in sick animals in Washtenaw County this year, according to the Humane Society of Huron Valley.

    The group reports an increase in distemper and parvovirus, two diseases that can be fatal to unvaccinated animals. More dogs have been submitted to its outpatient veterinary clinic with parvovirus, with which cats can also be infected, depending on the strain, the Humane Society said in a news release.

    Unvaccinated pets can contract the disease through contact with infected animals and bodily fluids, the release said.

    “It’s a concerning and sad situation for wildlife and for pets in danger of contracting these diseases,” CEO Tanya Hilgendorf said.

    Symptoms of both diseases include vomiting, diarrhea, lack of appetite, lethargy and dehydration, the release said. Distemper symptoms include neurological symptoms such as tremors, stumbling, seizures and paralysis. The symptoms can be fatal to animals, the animal welfare group said.

    Pets should be kept up to date with vaccines and owners should be careful where they take unvaccinated puppies, or older animals with weaker immune systems, Hilgendorf said.

    Sick or injured wildlife in Washtenaw County can be reported to the HSHV Rescue Department by calling 734-661-3512.
    https://www.mlive.com/news/ann-arbor...iety-says.html

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    https://www.kdrv.com/content/news/Ra...511238752.html

    And another vaccine comes out for dogs against rattlesnake venom.

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    https://www.abc15.com/news/region-so...emper-outbreak

    37 dogs euthanized, quarantine extended at MCACC shelter during parvo and distemper outbreak
    Posted: 3:05 PM, Jun 13, 2019 Updated: 3:43 PM, Jun 13, 2019
    By: abc15.com staff
    items.[0].image.alt
    MESA, AZ — Maricopa County Animal Care and Control says their east shelter will remain closed for at least another week while they continue to battle parvo and distemper outbreaks.

    According to MCACC, 37 dogs have had to be euthanized since June 3, 2019. According to the shelter, that includes 16 dogs that have tested positive for the distemper virus or that have shown severe symptoms while waiting for results.

    MCACC says they will reevaluate the quarantine in another week.



    Meanwhile, the MCACC west shelter will be holding a FREE “Emergency Empty the Shelters” adoption event this weekend. MCACC says they need help clearing space at the west shelter because that location is still taking in all lost and stray dogs in that area. The Bissell Pet Foundation is sponsoring the adoption event.

    All ADULT animals, seven months or older, will be free at the shelter between Friday and Sunday. All puppies and kittens will be 50 percent off.

    Copyright 2019 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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    https://www.mercurynews.com/2019/06/...-hits-oakland/

    At least five dogs at the Oakland city shelter have confirmed cases of canine influenza, according to Oakland Animal Services director Rebecca Katz.

    “If people can hold onto strays and surrenders for now, we ask them to do so. We’re also looking for organizations and other places to divert them to,” Katz said on Thursday. “If any dog comes into the shelter, they’re at pretty significant risk of getting it.”

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    While not every dog at the shelter is under quarantine, five out of ten samples the shelter had tested came back positive for the highly contagious virus.

    Like human flu, dog flu is most dangerous for puppies, seniors, and dogs who are already sick, and deaths are rare. However, an outbreak last year spread so quickly it killed dozens of dogs, underscoring the importance of early containment.

    About 80% of unvaccinated dogs exposed get infected, even if they don’t show signs of being sick, so immunization is key for dogs who go to dog parks and other doggy social events.

    Vaccination requires two shots, and immunity can take four to six weeks to kick in, so it’s a good idea to plan ahead if your pet is going to be exposed to new dogs. Every dog is different, though, so ask your vet what’s best for your pet.

    Symptoms are similar to human ones, including coughing, sneezing, lethargy and fever. If your dog has a mild case, it’s best to keep your dog home and give them lots of water and rest.

    If your dog is having trouble breathing or coughing up blood, head to an emergency room. If that happens, vets ask that you call ahead to warn them you’re bringing a potentially contagious dog, and leave them in the car when you get there so other patients don’t get exposed to the virus.

    If you pet someone else’s dog, make sure to wash your hands and change your clothes before touching yours – canine flu can stick around on fabric and skin.


    Oakland Animal Services is working with several groups, including the University of Wisconsin Shelter Medicine Program and University of California Davis, to contain the virus as quickly as possible.

    “We’ve called in the cavalry to help us get through this, and are working step by step to figure it out,” Katz said.

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