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Thread: Election 2020-get your popcorn ready!

  1. #176
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://variety.com/2020/music/news/...Pos=1#cxrecs_s

    Hit songwriter Diane Warren laid into Kanye West on Twitter, after the rapper/presidential candidate posted a video of himself — or someone — urinating on a Grammy Award that had been placed in a toilet.

    “How vile and disrespectful of U,” Warren wrote. “This was given to U by your peers out of respect for your work and U r literally pissing on them. I’ve won one Grammy and I’m forever grateful and humble that my peers found me worthy of it.”

    Assuming that was indeed one of West’s own Grammys getting the dowsing, he should still have plenty of unsoiled trophies to keep on his mantle. Warren made reference to West’s inordinately high career total, writing, “He has 21 Grammys this white bitcb (sic) got one Haha.”

    Reached for further comment by Variety, the songwriter said: “Maybe it just pissed me off.”

    Warren — someone who is known for being acidic in her own posts, and who, unlike West, is no MAGA supporter — further tweeted: “With all that peeing, now Trump wishes he had picked Kanye as VP and he could have been that Grammy!!”

    Despite continuing to accrue Grammy nominations each year, the last of West’s 21 wins came back in 2013, which may help explain his lack of reverence for the honor.

    West was expected to be a contender in the Grammys’ gospel categories this year for his two Christian-themed albums, “Jesus Is King” and “Jesus Is Born,” although how his desecration of a Grammy will sit with the gospel nominating committees would seem to be an open question at this point.

    West’s Christian albums were recently nominated for three Dove Awards by the Gospel Music Association, many of whose voters also vote for the Grammys.

    The, ahem, streaming video remains live on Twitter, unlike another tweet he posted Wednesday, which reportedly caused Twitter to temporarily lock his account. He posted what he said was the personal phone number of Forbes chief content officer Randall Lane, writing, “If anyone wants to call a white supremacist … this is the editor of Forbes.” Twitter was said to have frozen his account — which in the last couple of days had been posting up to a hundred-plus provocative posts a day — until he voluntarily agreed to remove the post and agree not to commit further violations of privacy, as is typical when users post private info in an attempt to dox an adversary.

    West’s other recent contentious posts have not brought up any enmity for the Grammys as an issue. He has been on a tear against Universal Music Group and Sony/ATV Music Publishing, saying he will not release new music until he is let out of his label and publishing contracts, respectively. He urged Universal to contact him but then said he would not speak with UMG chairman-CEO Lucian Grainge, insisting he would not talk with anyone at the sub-billionaire level. Comparing himself to Nat Turner and saying he is “the new Moses,” West has been urging other Black artists to join him in an uprising at being held to contracts — and even called upon Taylor Swift to join him, on top of Drake, Jay Z and others he singled out. So far, no major artists have spoken out in support of his crusade.

    The campaign to be freed of contractual obligations and own his master recordings seems to have superseded his presidential campaign, which has not been mentioned among the hundreds of tweets in recent days. The closest West came to addressing politics in any way in the latest tweetstorm was to refer to himself as “baby Putin.”

    Although, as Warren readily points out, she has only won one Grammy (for “Because You Loved Me”), she has received plenty of Recording Academy acknowledgement over the years in the form of 15 total nominations, for songs including “I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing,” “How Do I Live,” “Till It Happens to You” and “Stand Up for Something,” all of which were also Oscar-nominated.

    OK then.

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  5. #180
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    I'm a little confused and cannot decide if I should bet on Trump or Biden. I won money twice for Obama and then Trump.....but this time I'm stuck.

  6. #181
    Sana sana colita de rana beli's Avatar
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    do you guys also think it'll be a shit show if and when *fingers crossed* trump loses the election?
    Quote Originally Posted by Gawna View Post
    Roses are red, violets are blue, seriously where is the fucking ring I gave Julie and ask her mom about the flowers
    Quote Originally Posted by Ron_NYC View Post
    In all fairness, we have no idea how big this dude's cock was.

  7. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by beli View Post
    do you guys also think it'll be a shit show if and when *fingers crossed* trump loses the election?
    I think it will be interesting either way. If Trump loses the maga people will be angry and violent. If Trump wins the liberals will cry and whine and some of them will be violent.

    I can see Trump not wanting to leave the white house if he loses.

  8. #183
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beli View Post
    do you guys also think it'll be a shit show if and when *fingers crossed* trump loses the election?
    I think he will fight it every legal and not legal way possible. I think he's going to try to announce victory on election night, even though it's pretty obvious that votes won't be settled that night due to all the mail in votes, and more Republicans are voting in person and more Democrats are voting via mail. When they count the in person votes on election night it's going to look like he's ahead I think, but that's not counting in all the other votes, but you know he will try to make a play based on that.

  9. #184
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    I think he will fight it every legal and not legal way possible. I think he's going to try to announce victory on election night, even though it's pretty obvious that votes won't be settled that night due to all the mail in votes, and more Republicans are voting in person and more Democrats are voting via mail. When they count the in person votes on election night it's going to look like he's ahead I think, but that's not counting in all the other votes, but you know he will try to make a play based on that.
    I see this happening for sure.

    In other news, Romney is a spineless asshole. Votes to impeach Trump yet is going to support him installing a new justice because he wants to control women's rights.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

  10. #185
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Babe 73 View Post

    In other news, Romney is a spineless asshole. Votes to impeach Trump yet is going to support him installing a new justice because he wants to control women's rights.
    "I want to get back at Trump for what he did to me, but not if it means I can punish women."

  11. #186
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://wjla.com/news/nation-world/c...igh-court-list


    MIAMI (AP) — A daughter of Cuban exiles who has had a swift rise as a lawyer and judge is on President Donald Trump's short list to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the U.S. Supreme Court.

    The president said Monday that he does not personally know Barbara Lagoa, but praised her as "terrific." Barely veiled was the fact that, as a Cuban-American from South Florida's city of Hialeah, her selection could benefit Trump in the Nov. 3 election, when Florida could be the ultimate kingmaker. Lagoa grew up in a heavily Hispanic suburb of Miami.

    "She's excellent. She's Hispanic. She's a terrific woman from everything I know. I don't know her. Florida. We love Florida. So she's got a lot of things — very smart," Trump said in a call-in interview with "Fox and Friends."
    Asked whether politics would play a role in the decision, Trump responded: "I try not to say so. I think probably automatically it is. Even if you're not wanting to do that it becomes a little automatic."

    Speaking to reporters at the White House later Monday, Trump said he might meet Lagoa when he travels to Florida on Thursday for a campaign rally in Jacksonville. "She has a lot of support," said Trump, who added he held calls on Sunday and Monday with some of the candidates he's considering. "I don't know her but I hear she is outstanding."

    After the death Friday of 87-year-old Ginsburg, a liberal icon, Trump said he would name a woman as a replacement — possibly by Saturday. Trump said Monday he has about five top prospects.


    U.S. Circuit Judge Barbara Lagoa, of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, is shown in this official undated photo released by the Florida Supreme Court. (AP Photo/Florida Supreme Court)

    At 52, Lagoa would become the youngest member of the U.S. Supreme Court if nominated and confirmed.

    Lagoa, an only child, once joked that after graduating from Florida International University leaving her close-knit Cuban-American family for New York to obtain her law degree from Columbia University "was not a popular decision in my house."

    When she was picked for the Florida Supreme Court, Lagoa said her father gave up his dream of becoming a lawyer and that both her parents worked long hours while she rode her bike and roller skated down the streets of Hialeah where she was cared for by her grandmother.

    "My parents sacrificed to send me to Catholic school further instilling in me an abiding faith in God that has grounded me and sustained me through the highs and lows of life," she said.
    Lagoa is currently a judge on the Atlanta-based 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Trump appointed her to that post in 2019 and the Senate confirmed her on an 80-15 vote.

    Before that, for less than a year she was a justice on the Florida Supreme Court after more than a decade on a Miami-based state appeals court where she wrote some 360 opinions. She was the first woman of Hispanic heritage on the state Supreme Court.

    She's been in private practice, including work for Florida family members on the 2000 saga of the custody of Cuban rafter child Elian Gonzalez, which remains a hot-button issue in Miami to this day. Lagoa was also a federal prosecutor in Miami for a time.

    A Lagoa nomination may impact voters in the suburb of Hialeah, a popular site for campaigns seeking to persuade undecided voters.

    Last weekend, groups for Biden and Trump rallied Cuban-Americans with drive-by events waving flags in this bastion of working-class voters where precinct-level analysis suggest Trump was not as dominant among Cubans in 2016.

    "It is extremely exciting to have a fellow first-generation Cuban-American from Hialeah," said Annette Collazo, also a daughter of exiles who is running as a Democrat for state representative in a district that includes Hialeah. "I temper that excitement with the reality. While diversity in background and views are extremely important, we also need diversity in judicial approach."

    The process remains fluid, but as of Monday afternoon, conversations in the White House and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's office were increasingly focused on two finalists: Amy Coney Barrett and Lagoa.

    Coney Barrett emerged as the clear preference of a growing number of senators, largely because she is the much better-known of the two, having been through a grueling Senate confirmation process already and been embraced by the conservative base. Predictability is considered a crucial factor for the president and vulnerable senators so close to the election. Lagoa remains in the running, however, and those who know her well expect Trump to warm to her if and when they meet in person.

    In her short tenure on the 11th Circuit, one controversial ruling in which she was among five Trump appointees in the majority was a 6-4 decision earlier this month that Florida felons had to not only complete their prison time but also pay any fines, fees and restitution.

    There were calls from supporters of the original felon voting amendment for Lagoa and a fellow 11th Circuit Judge, Robert Luck, to recuse themselves from the case because they participated in a state Supreme Court case on the issue but neither did.

    The decision upheld a state law passed by the Republican-led Legislature that critics say violates the spirit of a constitutional amendment overwhelming approved by Florida voters in 2018 that potentially would enfranchise tens of thousands of former felons without the monetary considerations.

    Desmond Meade, who led the effort to pass the measure known as Amendment 4 , called the decision "a blow to democracy and to the hundreds of thousands of returning citizens across Florida."

    When she was appointed to the state Supreme Court by Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a Republican Trump ally, Lagoa had this to say about the role of the courts:

    "I am particularly mindful of the fact that under our constitutional system it is for the Legislature and not the courts to make the law. It is the role of judges to apply, not to alter, the work of the peoples' representatives. And it is the role of judges to interpret our Constitution and statutes as they are written."

    DeSantis said her credentials were "impeccable" and said Lagoa's background as the daughter of exiles who fled communist Cuba gave her a unique perspective on U.S. law. Lagoa was born in Miami in 1967 after her parents left Cuba.

    "My parents, like many others, came to this country from Cuba to start rebuilding their lives in a land that offered them opportunity, but more importantly, freedom," she has said.

    Lagoa is is also a member of the Federalist Society, a legal organization popular with conservatives. She is married to Miami lawyer Paul Huck Jr., whose father, Paul Huck Sr., is a senior judge on the Miami-based federal court. They have three daughters.

  12. #187
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/enda...ry?id=73165623

    Hours after news of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death on Friday, Republicans rushed to embrace President Donald Trump's and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's plans to fill her seat on the court, despite the looming presidential election. Sen. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., was one of the first GOP senators to support the decision, leaving Democrats scrambling for a plan to avoid welcoming a justice that could erase the decades of progress Ginsburg made for women, minorities, and those in need.

    She wasn't alone: Nearly every Republican senator lined behind Trump and McConnell, despite GOP opposition to holding a hearing for President Barack Obama's Supreme Court nominee, Merrick Garland, eight months from the election in 2016.

    MORE: Ruth Bader Ginsburg's impact on generations of women: 'She changed the way the law sees gender'
    That includes all but one of the half-dozen Republicans who, like McSally, are running for reelection in purple states this fall.

    Even as they struggle to adjust to the surprise Supreme Court development in the final weeks before the election, Republicans running for reelection see both a historic opportunity to push the Supreme Court to the right for decades, with a 6-3 majority, and an opportunity to align more closely with Trump on a key issue for their party.

    "Voting for a highly qualified woman justice may provide an energy to counteract what continues to be the biggest liability for many of the Republicans in swing seats: Trump," said Barbara Comstock, a former GOP congresswoman who worked in the Justice Department in the Bush administration, and on the confirmations of Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Samuel Alito.

    Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., who is seen as the most endangered Republican incumbent ahead of November, didn't have an answer to questions about the vacancy at a candidate forum on Saturday.


    But his office was prepared with a press release Monday evening, after he returned to Washington.

    "I have and will continue to support judicial nominees who will protect our Constitution, not legislate from the bench, and uphold the law. Should a qualified nominee who meets this criteria be put forward, I will vote to confirm," he said in a statement released at 7 p.m., local time.

    "Once the president puts forward his nominee for the Supreme Court, I will carry out my duty -- as a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee -- to evaluate the nominee for our nation's highest court," Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, who is running neck-and-neck with Democrat Theresa Greenfield, said on Monday.

    Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., who is in a competitive race against Democratic attorney Cal Cunningham, drew Trump's ire in 2017, after introducing a bill to help protect special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation, and nearly faced a primary over what some state Republicans considered a lack of support for the president.

    But he's drawn closer to Trump since then, warming up the crowd for him at a North Carolina rally on Saturday after announcing his support for considering Trump's nominee. There, the president even praised him for "being by my side."

    MORE: Ruth Bader Ginsburg, powerhouse Supreme Court Justice, dies at 87
    Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, is the only Republican up for reelection this year -- and one of two in the Senate, with Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska -- who has challenged McConnell's plans to bring a Supreme Court nominee through the chamber, weeks before the election.

    "We're simply too close to the election, and in the interest of being fair to the American people -- and consistent, since it was with the Garland nomination -- the decision was made not to proceed, a decision that I disagreed with, but my position did not prevail," Collins said Tuesday on Capitol Hill. "I now think we need to play by the same set of rules."

    By Tuesday, however, it appeared that McConnell had enough support to move ahead with confirming Trump will name his nominee, especially after Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, said he supports plans to fill the vacancy.

    Collins is an exception to what appears to be the rule, having carved out a career as a moderate, pro-choice voice in the Senate GOP, who could also take issue with Trump's pledge to appoint judges who would "automatically" overturn Roe. v. Wade.

    The timing of the Supreme Court vacancy could pose a challenge for Collins, and resurface her vote to confirm Justice Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court in 2018. That move put her in Democrats' crosshairs in 2020, helping to propel her opponent Sara Gideon, the Democratic Speaker of the Maine House. And her decision two years ago may still resonate with moderate voters who could ultimately decide the election.

    "People will be reminded in Maine of how important that vote was and they are going to hold it against Collins in all likelihood," Larry Sabato, director of the University of Virginia Center for Politics, said. Sabato's crystal ball shifted Maine's Senate race in Democrats' favor on Monday morning, moving it from a toss-up to a lean toward the party.

    Trump, too, is squeezing Collins for stepping out of line with his strategy, suggesting she will face electoral consequences.

    "I think that Susan Collins is going to be hurt very badly, her people aren't going to take this. People are not going to take it," he said on "Fox & Friends" Monday.

    WHERE THE SUPREME COURT FIGHT COULD HELP REPUBLICANS

    Whit Ayres, a veteran Republican pollster, said supporting Trump's nominee and plans for the confirmation process will likely benefit some candidates -- particularly those like Sen. Steve Daines, a Montana Republican up for reelection against Democratic Gov. Steve Bullock, in a state the president carried by 20 percentage points.

    "It depends totally upon what the president's job approval is in the state you're talking about," Ayres said.

    In states where Trump's approval numbers are poor, "it complicates matters substantially because those Republicans need to have 100% of the Trump supporters plus a significant number of Biden supporters in order to win," he said.

    With both sides looking to turn that energy into an electoral edge, that effort is becoming increasingly important in North Carolina, where a tight race could be the one that determines the balance of power in the Senate. Experts view the vacancy as a likely boon for Tillis' reelection bid, providing the first-term senator, who is trailing his Democratic rival in most polling, with a galvanizing issue for Republican voters still on the fence about him.

    "It seems to me that would help him. North Carolina is right on the edge," Sabato said. "This could be the difference right here -- 10, 15, 20,000 votes -- keeping North Carolina in the Republican column for president and for Senate. It's too early."


    As Republicans (mostly) toe the line with McConnell's path forward, the Democratic challengers across the key battlegrounds are issuing a singular refrain: Wait on the confirmation process until after the election.

    Mark Kelly, a top Democratic recruit who is seeking to oust McSally in a special election, argued against rushing the process "for political purposes," previewing the fights to come over the next month or so.

    "This is a decision that will impact Arizonans, especially with an upcoming case about health care and protections for pre-existing conditions," he said in a statement.

    MORE: Ruth Bader Ginsburg represented what 'is best about America': Bill Clinton
    Kelly is in a unique position come the fall, since a special election allows for the possibility of him being seated early -- a hurdle that could complicate McConnell's plans if they extend into a lame duck session.

    Barring any significant legal challenges, Kelly could be seated as early as Nov. 30, and both Republican and Democratic election law experts told ABC News that Arizona state law would allow him to take certified election results, showing him as the winner, to the Senate before January, in an attempt to assume McSally's seat.

    "There's nothing in the statute that says that he has to wait until all the other new senators are sworn in," Andrew Gordon, a lawyer and a Democrat, said.

    ABC News' Meg Cunningham contributed to the report.

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  14. #189
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    Looking forward to watching the debate next week. Should be hilarious.

  15. #190
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    Here are these Ex-Republicans making attack videos for Lincoln Project, and Republicans against Trump. This is going to be crazy from here.

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  17. #192
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.wusa9.com/article/news/v...6-8e0b53df0396


    WASHINGTON ? The Verify team spoke with two legal experts to gain insight on the most meaningful legal cases considered by Amy Coney Barrett, President Donald Trump's expected nominee as the replacement for Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

    "It's possible Mr. Trump could change his mind, but at this point, Barrett is expected to be announced as the president's choice Saturday afternoon at the White House," announced CBS News Friday evening. Multiple other outlets, including The New York Times, corroborated the decision.

    Specifically, the Verify team digs into her cases on gun rights and abortion.

    Sources:

    Erwin Chemerinsky, UC Berkely Law School

    Victoria Nourse, Georgetown University Law Center

    Kanter Vs. Barr, 2019 - Barrett Dissent

    Kristina Box, Commissioner, Indiana Department of Health, Et Al. V. Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky, 2019

    Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky, Inc Vs. Kristina Box, Commissioner, Indiana State Department of Health, et al., 2019

    Gun Rights:

    On social media, there is no shortage of posts about Barrett's legal history, relating to her support of the Second Amendment.

    ?Amy Coney Barrett wants to give guns rights to felons,? wrote one user on Twitter. "So there's that in her favor."

    The Verify team was able to identify that this claim was based on her dissent in the 2019 case, Kanter V. Barr.

    This legal dispute centered on a Wisconsin man named Rickey Kanter, who plead guilty to one count of Medicare fraud. As a result, he was prohibited from possessing a firearm.

    Victoria Nourse, a law professor at Georgetown Law School said Barrett wrote a strongly-worded dissent that was a "very pro-Second Amendment position."

    Barrett began her dissent with the following:

    "History is consistent with common sense: It demonstrates that legislatures have the power to prohibit dangerous people from possessing guns. But that power extends only to people who are dangerous.?

    In this dissent, Barrett argued that gun rights should be expanded to felons, who were not deemed to be dangerous.


    "Absent evidence that he either belongs to a dangerous category," she wrote. "Or bears individual markers of risk, permanently disqualifying Kanter from possessing a gun violates the Second Amendment."

    To read Barrett's full dissent, click here.

    Abortion:

    On the topic of abortion, Erwin Chemerinsky confirmed that Barrett has never directly ruled on an abortion case, as a judge in the 7th Circuit. However, she has cast multiple votes, signaling her opinion on the subject.

    In 2016, Indiana passed a law requiring that fetal remains be buried or cremated after an abortion. This lead to a legal dispute over the constitutionality of such a law.

    Eventually, the 7th Circuit deemed this law unconstitutional. In response, Barrett voted in favor of re-hearing the case.

    In 2019, there was another Indiana law that would require that parents be notified, when a girl under 18 sought an abortion. This would be mandatory, even if the girl asked the court to provide consent, rather than her parents. This too lead to a legal dispute.

    Barret once again voted to re-hear this case, which proved unsuccessful.

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  19. #194
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.fox5dc.com/news/republic...-supreme-court

    WASHINGTON - Republicans are expecting President Donald Trump to announce Saturday that he is choosing Amy Coney Barrett to fill the U.S. Supreme Court seat vacated by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, according to the Associated Press.

    Barrett, who has been considered a front-runner in the days following Ginsburg?s death, is a federal appellate judge and someone who has established herself as a reliable conservative on legal issues ranging from abortion to gun control.

    Barrett is a devout Catholic and has been hailed by religious conservatives and others on the right as an ideological heir to conservative Antonin Scalia, the late Supreme Court justice for whom she once clerked. If confirmed, her ascension would be sure to move the court rightward on health care and other pivotal issues.

    At just 48, Barrett would be the youngest justice and her tenure could last for decades.

    Liberals have said Barrett?s legal views are too heavily influenced by her religious beliefs and fear her appointment to the nation's highest court could lead to a scaling back of hard-fought abortion rights. She also would replace Ginsburg, a justice who is best-known for fighting for women's rights and equality.

    Trump has said multiple times that he intends to pick a woman. On Monday, he met with Barrett at the White House, according a person familiar with the vetting process who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

    Ginsburg?s death set off a battle over whether her seat should be filled so close to the Nov. 3 election. Republican Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah said this week that he supports voting to replace her, all but ensuring that Trump will have the backing for his pick to be confirmed in the Republican-controlled Senate.

    Senate Republicans are readying for confirmation hearings in two weeks, with a vote in the full chamber now expected before Election Day.

    ?I?m confident he?s going to make an outstanding nomination,? Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told FOX News. ?The American people are going to take a look at this nominee and conclude, as we are likely to conclude, that she well deserves to be confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court.?

    ?They?re hell-bent on getting this done as fast as possible,? said Democratic Senate whip Dick Durbin. ?They think it helps Donald Trump get reelected.?

    Barrett, who made her mark in law primarily as an academic at the University of Notre Dame, began teaching there at age 30. In 2017, Trump nominated Barrett to fill the vacant seat on the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, a jurisdiction that covers Indiana, Illinois, and Wisconsin, which was confirmed later that year by the Senate.

    Barrett was previously considered for the Supreme Court, among those on a list to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy in 2018. Trump ultimately chose to nominate Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

    Trump had released two lists with a total of 21 names of potential Supreme Court nominees during his previous presidential campaign and added another five names in 2017 after becoming president. Trump?s two nominees to the court, Justice Neil Gorsuch and Justice Brett Kavanaugh, were both drawn from the list.

    Even before Ginsburg?s death, Trump had done the same in 2020, releasing an additional 20 names he would consider for the court, and encouraging Biden to do the same. Besides Barrett, other considerations on the list included Republican Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas and Tom Cotton of Arkansas.

    Earlier this week, Trump highlighted some on his five-person short list from election battleground states, including Florida?s Barbara Lagoa.

    ?I?ve heard incredible things about her,? he said. ?I don?t know her. She?s Hispanic and highly respected. Miami. Highly respected.?

    In an interview with FOX Television Stations, Trump said Michigan's Joan Larsen, a federal appeals court judge, is ?very talented.?

    When looking at justices who sat on the bench of the Supreme Court, President George Washington and President Franklin D. Roosevelt had the most with eight each. In recent history, President Ronald Reagan had the most with three.

    This will be Trump?s third opportunity to nominate a justice to the Supreme Court.

  20. #195
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    https://wjla.com/news/local/dc-prayer-march-2020

    Washington (ABC7) — Thousand of people descended on the National Mall Saturday for the 2020 Washington Prayer March, led by the Reverend Franklin Graham.

    According to their website, the event is a prayer march "focused solely asking God to heal our land."

    Event organizers claimed the event was not a protest or political event, however, Vice President Mike Pence made an appearance following Rev. Graham and addressed the crowd. Former governor of Arkansas Mike Huckabee was also scheduled to attend.

    The two-hour event was scheduled to pause at seven locations along the 1.8-mile route, and participants would be asked to "pray silently using the focus and prompts for each location."



    One of the stops included the WWII memorial, where attendees would pray for our nation's military, police, and law enforcement and their families, as well as peace in our nation.

    ALSO READ: Exclusive: President Trump touts new economic plan aimed at elevating Black communities

    At the Washington Monument, the group was to pray for communities and families, an end to abortion, and the salvation of the lost.

    n a tweet, Liberty University President Jerry Prevo said:

    "These buses are filled with Christians committed to prayer and to God’s best for this nation. They’re college students today - and the leaders of tomorrow. They’re Champions for Christ."

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  24. #199
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Trump paid no taxes for the past fifteen years except for $750 in 2016 and 2017.

    Shocker.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

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    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://abcnews.go.com/Business/wire...taxes-73280930

    President Donald Trump paid just $750 in federal income taxes the year he ran for president and in his first year in the White House, according to a report Sunday in The New York Times.

    Trump, who has fiercely guarded his tax filings and is the only president in modern times not to make them public, paid no federal income taxes in 10 of the past 15 years.

    The details of the tax filings complicate Trump’s description of himself as a shrewd and patriotic businessman, revealing instead a series of financial losses and income from abroad that could come into conflict with his responsibilities as president. The president’s financial disclosures indicated he earned at least $434.9 million in 2018, but the tax filings reported a $47.4 million loss.

    The disclosure, which the Times said comes from tax return data it obtained extending over two decades, comes at a pivotal moment ahead of the first presidential debate Tuesday and weeks before a divisive election against Democrat Joe Biden.

    Speaking at a news conference Sunday at the White House, Trump dismissed the report as “fake news” and maintained he has paid taxes, though he gave no specifics. He also vowed that information about his taxes “will all be revealed,” but he offered no timeline for the disclosure and made similar promises during the 2016 campaign on which he never followed through.

    In fact, the president has fielded court challenges against those seeking access to his returns, including the U.S. House, which is suing for access to Trump's tax returns as part of congressional oversight.

    During his first two years as president, Trump received $73 million from foreign operations, which in addition to his golf properties in Scotland and Ireland included $3 million from the Philippines, $2.3 million from India and $1 million from Turkey. The president in 2017 paid $145,400 in taxes in India and $156,824 in the Philippines, compared to just $750 in U.S. income taxes.

    Trump found multiple ways to reduce his tax bills. He has taken tax deductions on personal expenses such as housing, aircraft and $70,000 to style his hair while he filmed “The Apprentice.” Losses in the property businesses solely owned and managed by Trump appear to have offset income from his stake in “The Apprentice” and other entities with multiple owners.

    During the first two years of his presidency, Trump relied on business tax credits to reduce his tax obligations. The Times said $9.7 million worth of business investment credits that were submitted after Trump requested an extension to file his taxes allowed him to reduce his income and pay just $750 each in 2016 and 2017.

    Income tax payments help finance the military and domestic programs.

    Trump, starting in 2010, claimed and received an income tax refund that totaled $72.9 million, which the Times said was at the core of an ongoing audit by the IRS.

    Richard Neal, D-Mass., the chair of the House Ways and Means Committee who has tried unsuccessfully to obtain Trump’s tax records, said the Times report makes it even more essential for his committee to get the documents.

    “It appears that the President has gamed the tax code to his advantage and used legal fights to delay or avoid paying what he owes,” Neal wrote in a statement. “Now, Donald Trump is the boss of the agency he considers an adversary. It is essential that the IRS’s presidential audit program remain free of interference.”

    A lawyer for the Trump Organization, Alan Garten, and a spokesperson for the Trump Organization did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Associated Press on the report.

    Garten told the Times that “most, if not all, of the facts appear to be inaccurate.”

    He said in a statement to the news organization that the president "has paid tens of millions of dollars in personal taxes to the federal government, including paying millions in personal taxes since announcing his candidacy in 2015.”

    The New York Times said it declined to provide Garten with the tax filings in order to protect its sources.

    During his first general election debate against Democrat Hillary Clinton in 2016, Clinton said that perhaps Trump wasn't releasing his tax returns because he had paid nothing in federal taxes.

    Trump interrupted her to say, "That makes me smart.”

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