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Thread: Michael Cummins, (25) Under Investigation for the deaths of 5 people

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    Michael Cummins, (25) Under Investigation for the deaths of 5 people

    https://www.koat.com/article/5-bodie...nhunt/27297508

    WESTMORELAND, Tenn. ?
    An officer in rural Tennessee shot the suspect in the investigation into the discovery of five bodies in two homes, capping an hourslong manhunt Saturday that ended with his capture.

    Tennessee Bureau of Investigation spokesman Josh DeVine said Michael Cummins, 25, was taken into custody that night about a mile away from one of the Sumner County crime scenes.

    Cummins was shot after he emerged from the woods, is believed to have produced multiple weapons and the situation escalated, DeVine said. Cummins is being treated at a local hospital for what are believed to be non-life-threatening injuries, DeVine said.

    None of the responding officers were injured.

    TBI?s airplane was able to help authorities spot Cummins on the ground in a creek bed, DeVine said.

    A number of law enforcement agencies had been searching for Cummins, saying he could be armed and dangerous.

    ?The community should hopefully be able to rest a little bit easier tonight, knowing that (Cummins) is in custody tonight,? DeVine said.

    Police said officers responding to a 911 call from a family member led to the original discovery of four bodies and an injured person at the first home. The injured victim was transported to a hospital with unspecified injuries. The fifth body was found in another home.

    The TBI believes the two scenes are related.

    Authorities have not released any details about the victims. They also have not said what kind of weapon was used.

    TBI is investigating the deaths and the officer-involved shooting, DeVine said.

    Sumner County is northeast of Nashville and borders Kentucky. The slaying were near the town of Westmoreland.

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    https://www.tennessean.com/story/new...ct/3603686002/

    More Details

    A suspect in five homicides in Sumner County was shot by law enforcement as he was taken into custody Saturday evening, according to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation.

    Michael Cummins, 25, was taken to a local hospital with non-life threatening injuries. No officers were injured.

    A "massive" manhunt for Cummins commenced after four homicide victims were found at a home on Charles Brown Road and one other at a home on Luby Brown Road, according to the TBI.

    A sixth, injured victim was found at the home on Charles Brown Road.

    The agency said there was reason to believe the two scenes were related and named Cummins as a suspect in the killings.

    Michael Cummins
    Michael Cummins (Photo: TBI)

    He was considered armed and dangerous, and law enforcement took him into custody at 10 p.m. after searching for him in the woods near the crime scenes.

    Cummins has not been charged with a crime.

    TBI spokesman Josh DeVine said he could not provide any information about the victims.

    The TBI is working to identify a motive and Cummins’ relationships with the victims.

    The scenes, in the 1100 block of Charles Brown Road and the 1500 block of Luby Brown Road, are in a wooded, rural northeast part of Sumner County between Westmoreland and Oak Grove near the Kentucky state line.

    Forensic scientists with the TBI were processing the crime scenes Saturday night, and roads to the area were blocked off.

    The TBI was notified of the homicides about 5:30 p.m. after a family member called 911, DeVine said.

    More than 100 law enforcement officers were involved in the search for Cummins on Saturday night. Beyond the TBI, the Tennessee Highway Patrol and Sumner County authorities participated in the search.


    TBI spokesman Josh DeVine gives an update on the search for a suspect in the killing of five people on Sumner County on Saturday, April 27, 2019. Amy Nixon, USA TODAY NETWORK - Tennessee

    The TBI used an airplane to locate Cummins in a creek bed roughly a mile from the crime scenes. More than a dozen officers from Sumner County’s joint SWAT Team responded to the location.

    Officers on the ground said Cummins produced multiple weapons, according to DeVine, and at least one officer fired and struck Cummins at least once.

    The TBI is now investigating the shooting of Cummins as well as the homicides. DeVine did not yet know which agencies were involved in the shooting.

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    https://abc7news.com/suspect-capture...homes/5274514/

    Update now 6 people are reported dead in the killings

    A suspect was taken into custody after six people were killed in two separate homes over the weekend in Tennessee, authorities said.

    Officials with the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI) responded to a home Saturday night on Charles Brown Road in Sumner County, where initially four people were found dead.

    A fifth victim was later found in another residence on Luvy Daniels Road, authorities said.

    Another person was found dead at the Charles Brown Road home, authorities announced Sunday afternoon.

    The victims have not been identified. Another person at the initial scene was injured and transported to the hospital.

    Police identified a suspect Saturday and launched a manhunt in which as many as 150 law enforcement agents fanned out across the surrounding rural area to search for 25-year-old Michael Cummins. Authorities also warned residents that he may be armed.

    Devine said a search plane flying over the region spotted an individual in a wooded area and sent officers to the location.

    "He was found in a remote area very close to the scene where these events occurred," Josh Devine, communications director for TBI, said Saturday night.

    Cummins was hiding in a creek bed and drew his weapon as the officers approached, authorities said.

    Police opened fire and struck Cummins at least once. He was later taken into custody and transported to a local hospital, police said.

    He is expected to survive.

    No officers were injured, authorities said.

    Cummins is awaiting charges for the alleged shooting, authorities said.

    The relationship between Cummins and the victims was not clear, but the investigation is still ongoing, DeVine said at a press conference on Saturday.

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    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/7-bodie...chael-cummins/

    Apparently that number has been changed to 7 people dead

    Officials say the seven people killed in two homes in rural Tennessee included the parents and uncle of the suspect. Law enforcement officials arrested 25-year-old Michael Cummins on Saturday about a mile away from one of the Sumner County crime scenes after an hours-long manhunt. Tennessee Bureau of Investigation Director David Rausch called the scenes "horrific" and "gruesome."

    "It's unprecedented," Rausch said. "We're talking about a mass killing. Thank goodness we don't see this too often."

    cummins.jpg
    Michael Cummins
    WTVF
    On Monday, TBI identified those killed as David Carl Cummins and Clara Jane Cummins, the suspect's parents; Charles Edward Hosale, his uncle; Rachel Dawn McGlothlin-Pee, whose relationship to him isn't clear; Rachel's 12-year-old daughter, Sapphire McGlothlin-Pee; and Rachel's mother, Marsha Elizabeth Nuckols. Another victim, Shirley B. Fehrle, was found in a separate home and has no known relationship to Cummins.

    An eighth victim, another relative, remained hospitalized in critical condition.

    "This is one of the worst things I've ever been involved with in Sumner County," said Sumner County Sheriff Sonny Weatherford during a Monday press conference. "I've never seen anything that would even come close to this."

    Police said officers responding to a 911 call from a family member led to the original discovery of four bodies and an injured person at the first home. On Sunday, the TBI said in a statement the bodies of two more victims had been found at the home, and Fehrle's body was discovered Sunday. Authorities have said the two scenes are related.

    Authorities have not released a possible motive or causes of death. Autopsies were still pending Monday morning.

    Saturday, a state law enforcement airplane helped authorities spot Cummins on the ground in a creek bed, TBI spokesman Josh Devine said. At least one officer fired at Cummins after he emerged from the woods. Cummins is believed to have produced multiple weapons and the situation escalated. He was then taken to a hospital for treatment of what's believed to be injuries that aren't life-threatening, DeVine said.

    None of the responding officers were hurt.

    Cummins has a criminal history and pleaded guilty to aggravated assault and attempted arson last year for torching a neighbor's home and attacking her in 2017, reports the Tennessean. He allegedly threatened the woman that he would return to "finish the job," the paper reports.


    He was sentenced to probation. The probation conditions reportedly included that he have no contact with the victim and that he undergo a mental health evaluation.

    The paper reports Cummins had also been previously arrested for domestic incidents involving relatives. In 2013, he was charged with attempted assault after he allegedly threw things at his aunt and damaged her home, according to the paper. In 2017, he allegedly assaulted his grandmother as the woman was trying to stop him from stealing his mother's purse, the Tennessean reports. He reportedly pleaded guilty to a domestic assault charge and was ordered to attend domestic violence classes.

    Cummins remains hospitalized, Devine said, and charges against him are pending.

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    Senior Member Angiebla's Avatar
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    He attacked his neighbor and set her house on fire and only got probation?

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    He attacked his neighbor and set her house on fire and only got probation?
    Well Cummins has been accused of assault twice prior to the murders. The victims of the assault was his family though too.

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    https://www.newschannel5.com/news/mi...ic-crime-scene

    Some of the surviving witnesses and victims talks about how they discovered the deaths of their family members.

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    https://www.wsmv.com/news/uncle-of-a...0f4db16d8.html


    You know things are that severe when the Uncle

    WESTMORELAND, TN (WSMV) - A man is distraught by what the TBI said his nephew did to eight people including his own parents.

    The agency is calling the Westmoreland murders the deadliest homicide event in the state in at least two decades.

    The suspect at the center of the case, Michael Cummins, is still at the hospital. Police shot him in the leg during his capture over the weekend.

    Once he's released from the hospital, he'll be taken to the Sumner County jail.

    His uncle, Brian Cummins, is still trying to process why this all happened.

    "It's hard to realize about what he did," Cummins said.

    Seven people are dead and another is in critical condition. A mile separates the two crime scenes in Westmoreland.

    The victims include Michael Cummins' mom and dad along with a 12-year-old girl.

    "I love him to death, but when he killed my brother and them, I wish I would've killed him that night," Cummins said.

    Court documents said Brian Cummins saw his nephew Saturday night wearing a white t-shirt with blood stains. Michael Cummins told him the stains were from chocolate.

    "I said no it ain't. I said that's dry blood," Brian Cummins said.

    The TBI's helicopter later found him in a creek bed half a mile from the Charles Brown Road scene.


    Two years ago, court documents show he set fire to a neighbor's house, assaulted her, and threatened to come back and finish the job.

    News4 spoke with the judge who signed off on giving him probation and ordering him to complete a mental health evaluation.

    "I don't regret endorsing what was in front of me by two very good attorneys," Sumner County Judge Dee David Gay said.

    "He should've been in a mental hospital and maybe stayed there for the rest of his life," Brian Cummins said.

    The TBI is still trying to figure out the timeline for the killings.

    Judge Gay also told News4 he signed a probation violation warrant with no bond for Cummins on Monday.

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    Its so severe that even some of the surviving family members wish Michael Cummins was dead.

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    Senior Member Music's Avatar
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    This is insane. I live about 30 minutes from Westmoreland.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jolly Roger View Post
    Why?

    Because I don't like anal penetration sex between men, I don't.

    Just because I don't like anal sex, doesn't make me any less gay or unable to be loved.

    I can't be the only one out here, I'm just not. Don't worry about it. Mind your fucking business.

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    https://www.newschannel5.com/news/pr...reland-murders

    Details get more insane

    SUMNER COUNTY, Tenn. (WTVF) — Three days after the 'deadliest homicide event in Tennessee in at least 20 years' new information is being released regarding the suspected killer, Michael Cummins and his probation status.

    On Saturday, April 27, Michael Cummins took the lives of seven people, three of which being members of his own family.

    Now, it has been confirmed that a probation officer was preparing an arrest warrant for Cummins the day before the homicides occurred.

    According to District Attorney Ray Whitley, a violation of probation affidavit was filed on Monday, April 22. This affidavit outlined numerous issues with Cummins' probation. These included missing appointments with his probation officer and not contacting with the probation office. Cummins also reportedly would not comply with the conditions of his probation which required him to receive mental health treatment.

    Whitley went on to say, the probation officer was working to get the warrant done on Friday, but was unable to get the signature of a judge by the end of the day. The following day, Cummins killed seven people.

    It has been noted that Cummins has a violent past. This has been confirmed by many court documents, as well as by statements from his family.

    The probation terms that were not upheld by Cummins that could have led to his arrest prior to the homicides stemmed from an incident that occurred in September of 2017. During this incident, Cummins set fire to the house of a neighbor and assaulted her when she tried to smother the flames.

    Cummins served 180 days in jail and then would be required to serve 10 years of probation, according to the plea agreement he signed.

    By: Caroline Lallo
    items.[0].image.alt
    SUMNER COUNTY, Tenn. (WTVF) — Three days after the 'deadliest homicide event in Tennessee in at least 20 years' new information is being released regarding the suspected killer, Michael Cummins and his probation status.

    On Saturday, April 27, Michael Cummins took the lives of seven people, three of which being members of his own family.

    ADVERTISING

    Now, it has been confirmed that a probation officer was preparing an arrest warrant for Cummins the day before the homicides occurred.

    According to District Attorney Ray Whitley, a violation of probation affidavit was filed on Monday, April 22. This affidavit outlined numerous issues with Cummins' probation. These included missing appointments with his probation officer and not contacting with the probation office. Cummins also reportedly would not comply with the conditions of his probation which required him to receive mental health treatment.

    Whitley went on to say, the probation officer was working to get the warrant done on Friday, but was unable to get the signature of a judge by the end of the day. The following day, Cummins killed seven people.

    It has been noted that Cummins has a violent past. This has been confirmed by many court documents, as well as by statements from his family.

    The probation terms that were not upheld by Cummins that could have led to his arrest prior to the homicides stemmed from an incident that occurred in September of 2017. During this incident, Cummins set fire to the house of a neighbor and assaulted her when she tried to smother the flames.

    Cummins served 180 days in jail and then would be required to serve 10 years of probation, according to the plea agreement he signed.


    The revelation that Cummins could have been arrested prior to the mass murder has many people wondering if this tragedy could have been avoided entirely.

    However, when asked if the system could have some prevented Cummins from carrying out the homicides, District Attorney Whitley told NewsChannel 5 that regardless of Cummins violating his probation, "you can't predict human behavior."

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    https://www.wsmv.com/news/medical-ex...9eb2d22cf.html

    Even More

    Seven people killed inside two homes near Westmoreland died from either blunt force trauma or sharp force injuries, according to the state medical examiner.

    Dr. Feng Li said the manner of death for all seven has been ruled as homicide.

    Michael Cummins, 25, has been named a suspect in the deaths.

    The eighth victim, a woman who has been identified as Michael Cummins' grandmother, remains in critical condition at a local hospital, according to the TBI.

    Cummins, 25, is accused off killing six people, including his mother and father, at a home on Charles Brown Road. He later allegedly killed a seventh person at a home on Luby Brown Road.

    Cummins was arrested on Saturday night after he was spotted in a creek bed, by agents in a TBI helicopter, near the home on Charles Brown Road.

    He was subsequently shot by law enforcement after the situation escalated, for reasons under investigation, according to the original news release from the TBI.

    Michael Cummins is still in the hospital and will be transferred to the Sumner County Jail when he is dismissed.

    The victims found inside the home on Charles Brown road were:

    David Carl Cummins, Michael Cummins’ father
    Clara Jane Cummins, Michael Cummins’ mother
    Charles Edward Hosale, Michael Cummins’ uncle
    Rachel Dawn McGlothlin-Pee, unknown relation to Michael Cummins
    Sapphire McGlothlin-Pee, daughter of Rachel Dawn McGlothlin-Pee
    Marsha Elizabeth Nuckols, mother of Rachel Dawn McGlothlin-Pee
    Shirley B. Fehrle was found dead inside a home on Luby Brown Road.

    According to court documents, Fehrle appeared to have blunt force trauma to her face as well as injuries to her extremities, and Cummins is accused of killing Fehrle and stealing her Kia Forte.

    Before his capture, Cummins was said to have been seen in a blood stained t-shirt by witnesses, who he told the stains were chocolate.

    Witnesses said Michael Cummins told them that if anything goes down, he would get blamed for it and he was saving a bullet for himself.

    So far, Cummins has been charged with criminal homicide in connection with Fehrle, theft of over $10,000 and violation of probation.

    A warrant was signed on Monday after the incidents charging Michael Cummins with violation of probation.

    According to the warrant, he violated the terms of his probation after entering a guilty plea for attempted aggravated arson and aggravated assault.

    Michael Cummins was placed on 10 years probation and served no jail time after entering a guilty plea.

    The warrant filed on Monday cited Cummins as a suspect in the murders, failing to comply with special conditions of his probation specifically addressing a mental health evaluation, and no contact order with Pamela Sanabria.

    More charges are anticipated from the District Attorney’s Office.

    The bodies inside the Charles Brown Road home were originally discovered on Saturday evening after a family member called 911 after finding four bodies.

    As the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation processed the scene, two additional bodies were found in the home.

    The TBI said that an examination of crime data shows the murders are the “deadliest homicide event in Tennessee in at least 20 years.”

    Brian Cummins, Michael Cummins’ uncle, told News4 on Monday that he wished he would have killed him.

    “I love him to death, but when he killed my brother and them, I wish I would’ve killed him that night,” Brian Cummins said.

    Court documents said Brian Cummins saw his nephew wearing a white T-shirt with blood stains. Michael Cummins told him the stains were from chocolate.

    “I said ‘No it ain’t. I said that’s dry blood,” Brian Cummins said on Monday.

    Criminal Court Judge Dee David Gay signed off on Michael Cummins’ probation last year, giving him probation and ordering him to complete a mental health evaluation.

    “I don’t regret endorsing what was in front of me by two very good attorneys,” Gay told News4 on Monday night.

    Brian Cummins said his nephew should have been put away, perhaps for life, at that time.

    “He should’ve been in a mental hospital, and maybe stayed there for the rest of his life,” Brian Cummins said.

    In 2017, Michael Cummins set fire to a neighbor’s mobile home, assaulted her and threatened to return to finish the job.

    He has been charged with multiple crimes since 2013, including an additional assault case and a violation of a protection order.

    The TBI is still trying to figure out the timeline for the murders.

    Sumner County Schools released a statement on Monday regarding the loss of one of their students and said additional counseling staff would be placed at Westmoreland Middle School for students and employees.

    Counselors will also be on hand for law enforcement. The TBI director said it may take several days before the shock of what they have seen sets in.

    A GoFundMe page has been started to help raise money for the cost of the victims' funerals. You can access the fundraising page here.

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    Senior Member Joey2407's Avatar
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    Michael Cummins is pure evil. I wonder if he'll plead insanity. On a side note: dang, Kambing, you've been busy! Lol

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    https://www.tennessean.com/story/new...er/3706339002/

    New fallout from the Michael Cummins case. Cummins was facing another murder investigation prior to the rest of the family getting killed.

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    https://www.tennessean.com/story/new...ls/3706296002/

    Here is more

    .
    The Tennessean

    'He heard the screams and ran': Sheriff gives new details in Michael Cummins homicide cases
    Natalie Neysa Alund and Amy Nixon, Nashville Tennessean Published 8:47 a.m. CT May 22, 2019 | Updated 10:45 a.m. CT May 22, 2019

    Michael Cummins, 25, faces multiple murder charges in connection with the death of eight people in Sumner County, Tennessee. Ayrika L Whitney, The Tennessean


    MORE
    WESTMORELAND ? Michael Cummins heard the piercing screams from several hundred yards away, authorities said, as he tried to dig out a stolen black Kia stuck in gravel along Middle Forks Drake Creek in a heavily wooded area 50 miles north of Nashville.

    His family members had found the bodies.

    So he took off into the woods, just behind the crime scene, according to Sumner County Sheriff Sonny Weatherford.

    A small, narrow mobile home with white siding on Charles Brown Road in rural Westmoreland was where Cummins, 25, sometimes stayed in a cramped living space with his parents, grandmother, uncle and three other family friends.

    About 5 p.m. on April 27, family members approached the residence and opened the front door to find all but one of them dead.

    The discovery would lead more than 100 local and state law enforcement agents on an hourslong manhunt through the backwoods near the Kentucky border in an effort to capture Cummins, later arrested in connection to the killings, two other deaths and one attempted slaying in a twisted case authorities called the deadliest mass killing in Tennessee history.


    At the center of it all, Weatherford said he knew the killings would put the county of just over 160,000 residents on the map ? and for the worst of reasons. As the body count rose, he grew more and more disheartened.

    "When they said four bodies I was like, 'Oh my gosh, this is terrible,'" he said. "When they found six I'm like, 'We're going to make the record books.'

    "When they said they had seven, I was like, 'Now we've made the record books.' And then, because I already knew about (the eighth victim), I thought, 'When this comes out, we won't even be close to anybody.'"

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    https://www.tennessean.com/story/new...ty/1524728001/

    Editor's note: This story explores suicide, including details of one person's attempts at suicide. If you are at risk, please stop here and contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline for support at 1-800-273-8255.

    Michael Cummins was in a jail cell in late August 2013, blood streaming down his head and face, alerting officers that the voices in his head were telling him to hurt himself.

    He had been arrested that month and charged with domestic assault after attacking his aunt.

    Cummins attempted suicide five times in jail and harmed himself on several other occasions in just a little over a month, Tennessee Department of Correction records show.

    Less than six years later, he would be accused of brutally killing eight people in the small Middle Tennessee community of Westmoreland. Cummins was on probation at the time of the deaths and had failed to get an ordered mental health evaluation.

    A review of more than 100 pages of state records points to a history of violent mental health issues, though all records released to the USA TODAY Network - Tennessee indicate Cummins was a harm only to himself while in jail.

    Related: Michael Cummins: Before 8 homicide charges, a life of poverty, stalking and attempted suicide

    Cummins was frequently placed on suicide watch during the late summer of 2013 and at times was taken to Sumner Regional Medical Center for observation and treatment.

    Officers often were required to perform suicide checks on Cummins every five minutes and once found him pacing naked in his cell. They saw him beat his head against hard objects on several occasions.

    He told them things like "I need help," "I'm ready to die," "The devil and demons are in (my) cell and talking to (me)" and "Please make it stop."

    More suicide attempts, violence in 2017
    After 2013, Department of Correction records on Cummins come to a halt until he reappears in February 2017 after he was arrested for stealing a neighbor's turkey.

    In the short time he spent in jail for that offense, Cummins again harmed himself several times, told officers he "might as well just kill his (expletive) self," and attempted suicide at least once.

    Cummins told an officer on March 6, 2017, that "although he did not wish to harm himself, he was not feeling right in the head," according to an incident report from the Sumner County Jail.

    The officer began watching Cummins, who was already on suicide watch and checked every five minutes, even closer.

    Still, while the officer was passing out food to other inmates, Cummins was found with his head face down in his toilet. A day later, officers found him sipping and licking an empty bottle of floor cleaner he told officers he drank. Another inmate told officers he saw Cummins drink the entire bottle.

    Records released to The Tennessean do not indicate Cummins was ever transported to the hospital for care during that time.


    After Cummins was released from jail, he was placed on probation but arrested shortly thereafter in May for robbing his mother and grandmother of painkillers. His state probation record does not include any reports from that short stay in jail.

    Cummins was arrested again in September 2017 after he tried to burn down his neighbor's house and assaulted her when she tried to put out the fire.

    In that case, Cummins pleaded no contest to aggravated assault and attempted arson and spent a little more than a year behind bars before being released in January of this year.

    State records show that on Sept. 14, 2017, just a day after his arrest, Cummins told officers he swallowed 10 batteries and was taken to Sumner Regional Medical Center. He was scheduled to have surgery on Sept. 15, but the doctor decided surgery was unnecessary because the swallowed items "moved through his intestines," according to the report. Cummins began acting strangely, the report states, "constantly rocking back and forth in the bed and saying that he needed to go to Vanderbilt."

    Reports again described Cummins banging his head against walls and doors, and indicated he was often on suicide watch. On Oct. 1, 2017, he told officers, "I need some mental health," according to a report.

    That was the last report about Cummins acting violently in his state corrections records.

    Other reports indicated he stole items from other inmates' cells and was at least once beaten for stealing. He was found snorting a crushed pill and attempting to tattoo himself. But none of the records indicate he was ever violent to anyone other than himself while incarcerated.

    County jails and mental health services
    Larger counties often have more resources to provide mental health services to inmates in their jails, explained Jim Hart, jail management consultant with the University of Tennessee County Technical Assistance Service.

    Often, larger counties contract with health care agencies to provide on-site staff, including mental health care professionals, he explained.

    Michael Cummins puts his head in his hands during his second hearing May 29, 2019, in Gallatin. Charges include one count each of criminal homicide, theft of property $10,000 to $60,000 and attempted first-degree murder, and seven counts of first-degree murder.Buy Photo
    Michael Cummins puts his head in his hands during his second hearing May 29, 2019, in Gallatin. Charges include one count each of criminal homicide, theft of property $10,000 to $60,000 and attempted first-degree murder, and seven counts of first-degree murder. (Photo: Larry McCormack/The Tennessean )

    "By having resources more at your disposal rather than relying on an external entity, you have better coverage, more consistent coverage, more day-to-day coverage of those inmates," Hart said.

    Contracts may also include training for corrections staff so they can better recognize and deal with inmates who are suicidal or having mental health issues.

    Whenjails have to rely on off-site help, inmates get less exposure to mental health care, Hart said.

    Inmates may get a referral to a provider, but it could be for a one-time meeting.

    "That's the nature of it," he said. "They're an inmate and getting referred because of something significant."

    In Sumner County, Sheriff Sonny Weatherford said inmates experiencing mental health crises are transported to Sumner Regional Medical Center, where a doctor examines them and then directs what care comes next.

    The jail has medical staff on-site, but not mental health staff, Weatherford said.

    Calls to Jail Administrator Sonya Troutt were not returned.

    Failure to comply with probation requirements
    After his release in January, Cummins was put on probation and ordered to get a mental health evaluation, which he never did.

    Records show Cummins signed monthly probation forms in February and March.

    But on April 10, Cummins fled from his home on Charles Brown Road when officers attempted a home visit. Two days later, he failed to report to his probation officer, and several attempts to reach Cummins by phone were unsuccessful, records show.

    On April 26, Cummins' probation officer completed a probation violation report.

    "The judge was unavailable to sign the warrant and the warrant is being taken Monday morning for signature," a note from April 26 states.

    But Monday was too late.

    Over the weekend, Sumner County officials and the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation would find the bodies of seven people at two crime scenes in rural Westmoreland:

    Cummins' parents, Clara and David Cummins
    His uncle Charles Hosale
    Hosale's girlfriend, Rachel McGlothlin-Pee
    Her mother, Marsha Nuckols
    Her 12-year-old daughter, Sapphire McGlothlin-Pee
    Cummins' neighbor Shirley B. Fehrle
    More than a week earlier, James Fox Dunn Jr. was found dead outside his burned cabin.

    Read more about the investigation: Sumner County authorities found Jim Dunn headless but didn't tell public until 7 more died

    Cummins, who over the span of five years had attempted suicide at least six times, was by Monday the suspect in what officials have called the most deadly mass killing in Tennessee.

    Regional Editor Amy Nixon can be reached at anixon@gannett.com or 615-946-7549.

  17. #17
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    https://www.tennessean.com/story/new...de/1644981001/

    Autopsies of seven of the eight people killed in Westmoreland, Tennessee, paint a graphic picture of what happened in a small town mobile home before someone opened the door to a tragedy on April 27.

    The Davidson County Medical Examiner released the full reports Tuesday.

    They show violent attacks that left shattered skulls and dozens of slash wounds.

    David Cummins, 51, Marsha Nuckols, 64, Charles Hosale, 45, Clara Cummins, 44, Rachel McGlothlin-Pee, 43, and Sapphire McGlothlin-Pee, 12, were found dead in the family residence after a family member called police to the horrifying scene.

    Shirley Fehrle, 69, was found dead at her neighboring home.

    Michael Cummins, 25, has been charged in connection with the deaths and is closely related to the victims.

    Police reported at the time that investigators initially found four bodies inside the trailer before later discovering the two others.

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    Multiple cuts, scrapes and bruises to the head, the torso and the limbs were reported on almost all of the victims. The wounds were made by both blunt- and sharp-force instruments such as a bat or crowbar and a knife or hatchet, although the weapons used have not been identified.

    Many of the victims had more than a dozen cuts on their faces and heads, the reports showed.

    Death came not from one blow, but repeated hits, the report revealed. The combination of so many injuries was named as the cause of death for each of the seven victims.

    Each death was ruled homicide by the medial examiner's office.

    Although no clear evidence of sexual trauma was reported in any of the autopsies, tests for sexual assault were ordered for each victim. The results of those tests were not included in the reports.

    Michael Cummins is also suspected in connection with the killing an eighth person, James Dunn, 63, whose autopsy has not been released to the public.

    Michael Cummins is the son of David and Clara Cummins, and is the nephew of Hosale.

    Rachel McGlothlin-Pee; her mother, Nuckols; and daughter, Sapphire McGlothlin-Pee were staying in the trailer due to Rachel's relationship with Hosale, police believe

  18. #18
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    https://fox17.com/news/local/trial-d...-death-penalty

    A trial date has been set for the man accused of killing 8 people in northern Sumner County last year.

    Michael Cummins' trial is set to begin on April 20, 2022, the Hendersonville Standard reports.

    Prosecutors expect it to run about a month. Investigators say Cummins killed 8 people last year, including his mother and father.

    Cummins was indicted by a Grand Jury for the first-degree murder of eight people, attempted murder of one person, theft of a rifle and motor vehicle.

    All eight victims died of blunt force head injuries, an arrest report said. The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation said the April 27 incident was the deadliest homicide event in 20 years. Attorneys previously told FOX 17 News they are seeking the death penalty.

    A lone survivor of the attacks, Cummins' grandmother, was hospitalized and released. The youngest victim was just 12 years old.

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