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Thread: Misogynistic bullshit!

  1. #126
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    https://www.cnn.com/2019/12/01/us/wo...ult/index.html

    Woman sues Chicago nightclub, alleging security guards stood by as she was sexually assaulted in an alley

    A woman is alleging that employees at a Mexican restaurant and nightclub in Chicago escorted her to an alley behind the business and stood by as a man allegedly sexually assaulted her while she was intoxicated, according to lawyers who filed a lawsuit against the business.
    No arrests have been made in the incident, which allegedly occurred October 18 behind El Hefe Chicago at 15 West Hubbard Street, commonly known as El Hefe.

    Lawyers for the woman say they believe the alleged assailant either works at the business or knows someone on the staff. On Wednesday, a judge ordered El Hefe to preserve any potential evidence pertaining to the alleged assault from that night, including surveillance video.

    "I'm confident that [these videos] are going to show that El Hefe was involved in this, that they knew who this individual was and throughout that evening, this assailant and suspect was having conversations and was friendly with the bar staff and in fact knew the bar staff," John Chwarzynski said in an interview with CNN affiliate WLS.

    The woman's lawyers released a security camera video, which they say Chicago police obtained from a nearby business. The video appears to show a man guiding a stumbling woman down an alley as two other men stand by a doorway.

    El Hefe has not responded to requests for comment from CNN, but the business posted a statement on Facebook saying its security staff did not witness a sexual assault.

    "On the evening of October 18, a female guest became ill inside El Hefe and, per the venue's standard protocol, was escorted by our security team to the back exit," the statement said. "A male guest followed the female guest as she was escorted out back. El Hefe called an ambulance for the female guest and security remained with her until she left, alone, on the ambulance. During this time, our security team did not witness an assault in the alley. The male guest went back inside the venue and minutes later security witnessed the male guest leave the premises through the front door. We will work with law enforcement and cooperate in all facets necessary to help the authorities get the facts and enable a speedy investigation."

    Chicago police said officers went to Northwestern Hospital after receiving a report of a sexual assault involving a 23-year-old woman who was found unresponsive in the alley behind El Hefe. The victim completed a sexual assault kit at the hospital and Chicago police confirmed that she showed signs of trauma, police spokesman Ronald Westbrooks said in a statement.

    No arrests have been made and the investigation is ongoing, Westbrooks said.

    The lawsuit, filed in Cook County Circuit Court, says the woman, identified only as Jane Doe, was having drinks at the bar when she was approached by an unknown man who continued to buy her drinks.

    A bartender noticed the man make sexual advances and said her condition was "rapidly deteriorating" after consuming drinks the man purchased, according to the lawsuit. The bartender, who is not named, believed the woman had been drugged, the lawsuit said.

    The bartender told the man to stop making sexual advances after the woman vomited at the bar, but the man replied, "she could not tell him what to do," according to the lawsuit.

    El Hefe security guards removed Jane Doe from the bar due to her "deteriorated condition" and ushered her out with the man into the rear alleyway behind the establishment, according to the lawsuit.

    "The security guards that escorted the plaintiff into the dark alley with her assailant stayed in the alley while the plaintiff was sexually assaulted about 100 feet away," the lawsuit says. No employee made any attempt to stop the alleged assault, the lawsuit says.

    Chwarzynski released to the media a 19-minute, 37-second video that he said was taken from a business across the alley and given to him by Chicago police. The video has brief gaps, and the lawyer said police delivered it that way.

    In the video, two men dressed in black stand by the back door to El Hefe as a third man, also clad in black but wearing red shoes, guides a stumbling woman out the door and down an alley lined with dumpsters.

    The man and woman move into a shadowy area and it's impossible to tell what they're doing. The two other men go in and out of the door, standing outside for minutes at a time and sometimes approaching the spot where the man and woman appear to be.

    Other people walk down the alley and several vehicles pass through. After about eight minutes, the man in red shoes walks down the alley and goes through the back door. Men who appear to be police officers walk down the alley and eventually flashing lights appear at the end of the alley.

  2. #127
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    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...reast-n1101281

    A police officer was arrested Thursday on a charge that he fondled the breast of a dead woman in October, according to authorities and court documents.

    Officer David Rojas, 27, who has been with the Los Angeles Police Department for four years, was arrested by the department’s internal affairs division.

    He is charged with one count of having sexual contact with human remains in the Oct. 20 incident, which occurred after Rojas and his partner responded to a call about a woman who had died, prosecutors said in a statement.

    Rojas was released Thursday on $20,000 bail, according to jail records. It was not clear if he had an attorney who could speak on his behalf. A phone number for Rojas could not immediately be found Thursday night.

    The Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office said Rojas faces up to three years in prison if convicted.

    "This incident is extremely disturbing and does not represent the values of the Los Angeles Police Department," LAPD Chief Michel Moore said in a statement.

    The LAPD said earlier this month that an officer was removed from active duty amid an investigation. The Associated Press reported at the time that that the alleged incident was captured on the officer’s body camera despite an effort to turn it off.

    The officer turned off the camera after being left alone with the corpse and then turned it on, but the cameras have two-minute buffering periods that record what happens right before they are activated, the AP reported, citing a person briefed on the investigation.
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  3. #128
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    Deadlines be damned. We're still here, and we're still people. I guess women aren't real people in the US. And for the people who say these rights are already inshrined in the state and local level, then there's no issue with having the same protection at a Federal level.

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/01/11/polit...rnd/index.html

    When Virginia opened its 2020 legislative session this week, the Equal Rights Amendment, a century-long dream of progressives and feminists that would ban discrimination on the basis of sex and guarantee equality for women under the Constitution, appeared closer than ever to fruition.

    State Democrats, who now control both chambers of the legislature as well as the governor's mansion, are pushing forward with their efforts to make the commonwealth the 38th -- and potentially final -- state to ratify the amendment.

    But opponents, who claim the ERA will pave the way for greater abortion access and say equal-rights protections for women have already been enshrined at federal and state levels, have vowed to block the national ratification effort. And it's unclear whether actions taken by Congress and dozens of states more than 40 years ago will stand up under legal challenges from conservatives who say the window to ratify the ERA expired decades ago.

    That was the view of the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel made public on Wednesday, which, citing a 1979 congressional deadline, blocked the archivist of the United States from verifying the amendment should it be approved by the necessary three-fourths of state legislatures.

    Virginia Democrats, however, are pressing on. The state Senate advanced a bill on Thursday to ratify the amendment, and House Speaker Eileen Filler-Corn, the state's first female speaker, has vowed to pass the ERA in her chamber.

    "For too long, women have not had the protections from discrimination we deserve in the U.S. Constitution, and with passage of the ERA, we'll be that much closer to living in a world where women and girls have the same opportunities as men," Virginia Del. Jennifer Carroll Foy, who introduced the House resolution to ratify the ERA, said in a statement to CNN Wednesday.

    Conservative opponents are ready.

    Douglas Johnson, the National Right to Life's senior policy adviser, expects that once Virginia or another state ratifies the amendment, the national archivist will be sued by liberal attorneys general in federal court, where he's confident the anti-ERA position will prevail.

    "The narrative that the ERA is on the verge of ratification," Johnson said, "is pure political theater."First proposed by suffragist Alice Paul, the ERA, then known as the "Lucretia Mott Amendment," was first introduced to Congress in 1923, but the effort to pass it -- which requires the approval of three-fourths of states, or 38, to be added to the Constitution -- didn't gain real traction until the women's movement of the late 1960s and '70s. In March 1972, Congress finally passed the ERA and sent it to the states to ratify within a seven-year window, later extending the deadline to 1982.

    In the mid-70s, the ERA looked headed for ratification. But after an initial flurry of approvals, support for the ERA stalled under pressure from social conservatives and anti-feminists like the late Phyllis Schlafly, the organizer of the "STOP ERA" campaign. She claimed, among other things, that it would lead to more widespread abortion and require women to serve in the military.

  4. #129
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    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...t-fun-n1116651

    Lucido, the Senate's majority whip, is a married father of three whose district includes Lansing, the state capital. He is also reported to be eyeing a run for governor in 2022 against Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat.

    Donahue, who is from western Michigan, covers education, immigration and women's and LGBTQ issues for the Michigan Advance, a free nonprofit news site based in Lansing.

    In her account, Donahue said she was waiting to ask Lucido about his involvement in an anti-Whitmer group on Facebook, which includes "posts about graphic violence against Democrats, anti-Muslim rhetoric and degrading comments about women."

    Lucido had been hosting a group of students from his alma mater, De La Salle Collegiate, an all boy's Catholic high school in the Detroit suburb of Warren.

    "I asked Lucido for a moment to address the issue at hand, and he told me he would catch up with me after he was finished honoring the group of students," Donahue wrote. "As I turned to walk away, he asked, 'You've heard of De La Salle, right?'"

    Donahue said she hadn't.

    "'It's an all boys' school,' he told me," Donahue wrote. "'You should hang around! You could have a lot of fun with these boys, or they could have a lot of fun with you.'"

    Then, according to Donahue, "the teenagers burst into an Old Boys' Network-type of laughter, and I walked away knowing that I had been the punchline of their 'locker room' talk."

    Donahue wrote that she was outraged and embarrassed.

    "The senator's insinuating comments about the 'fun' I might have with a group of teenage boys was belittling and it came from a place of power," she wrote. "It made me feel small and it made me want to walk away from the Capitol and tell my editor that Lucido wasn't available to comment."

    But Donahue stayed put. "The 15-year-old girl in me, who didn't know how to advocate for herself then, was telling me to do it now," she wrote.

    Donahue said that when Lucido returned, she asked him about the Facebook group and then, her voice shaking, gave him a piece of her mind.

    "I thought the comment that you made was unprofessional in front of the group of boys, saying that I would have fun with them," she wrote that she told Lucido. "I don't know what you were insinuating, but—"

    Donahue wrote that Lucido cut her off and went into a long explanation about how De La Salle is an all-male school and how he grew up feeling awkward around women.

    "I didn't even know how to act around a woman," Lucido said, according to Donahue.

    Donahue wrote that when she countered that he wouldn't have made that kind of remark to a male reporter, Lucido "assured me it was nothing personal and this is just how he talks to young women."


    Donahue said she bounced what happened with Lucido off her editor, who happens to be a woman. "She said something along the lines of 'men have said weird things to me but never something so explicit.'"

    "I realized how serious his insinuation was," Donahue said.

    So she wrote it all down, and her story was published Wednesday in the Michigan Advance.

    Bill Roose, a spokesman for De La Salle, said that most of the students didn't hear Lucido's crack and that those who laughed did so when Donahue said she'd never heard of their school.

    Nevertheless, Roose said the school doesn't approve of Lucido's reported remarks, and he released a statement from Principal Nathan Maus.

    "Senator Lucido's comments do not represent De La Salle nor the values and conduct we instill in our young men," Maus said. "We are very sorry the reporter was put in this position and we have met with the boys who were on the tour to discuss the improper nature of this situation."
    When I see these sexist assholes, I always wonder how they would feel if their daughters were treated this way. I am guessing they would whine and cry and lose their minds if their daughter was treated like this.
    Last edited by raisedbywolves; 01-16-2020 at 12:43 AM.

  5. #130
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    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...s-say-n1132971

    A federal Transportation Security Administration agent tricked a traveler into twice showing him her breasts as she went through security at one of the world's busiest airports, California's attorney said.

    Attorney General Xavier Becerra said Johnathon Lomeli, 22, was working at Los Angeles International Airport in June when he used fraud or deceit to falsely imprison the woman. Lomeli was arrested early Thursday at his home.

    He first said he had to look inside her bra to make sure she wasn't hiding anything, then had her hold her pants away from her waist so he could look inside, she told investigators.

    He subsequently took her to what he said would be a private room for more security screening, according to an arrest affidavit. But once they were alone on an elevator, she said he told her he could do the screening right there.

    The woman said Lomeli told her he had to make sure she still had nothing in her bra, requiring her to lift her shirt “to show me your full breasts.” He also again looked down her pants, she said, before telling her she was free to go and adding that she had nice breasts.

    He was being held in lieu of $50,000 bail and was expected to make an initial appearance Friday in Los Angeles County Superior Court. Officials with the union representing TSA employees, the American Federation of Government Employees, did not respond to requests for comment, and officials could not say if Lomeli has a lawyer.

    The TSA initially brought the case to the FBI and Lomeli was let go from his airport job months ago, said FBI spokeswoman Laura Eimiller.

    She said the initial complaint involved "improperly screening at least one woman in a private area of the airport.”

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    Doesn't sound right. Women aren't supposed to be checked by men, there are always multiple agents at the checkpoint how was this guy able to walk off alone with a female? Private screening rooms are located right next to the checkpoints there would be no need to take an elevator. Either this guy was super clever or the woman super stupid. Maybe both.

  7. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by S281Saleen160 View Post
    Doesn't sound right. Women aren't supposed to be checked by men, there are always multiple agents at the checkpoint how was this guy able to walk off alone with a female? Private screening rooms are located right next to the checkpoints there would be no need to take an elevator. Either this guy was super clever or the woman super stupid. Maybe both.
    Or this woman doesn't fly and doesn't know how it works, and lots of people are intimidated by the TSA because they have the power to keep you from getting on an airplane just because a bunch of scared people shit their pants after 9-11 and sold all our rights and liberties away so that they could feel safe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Or this woman doesn't fly and doesn't know how it works, and lots of people are intimidated by the TSA because they have the power to keep you from getting on an airplane just because a bunch of scared people shit their pants after 9-11 and sold all our rights and liberties away so that they could feel safe.
    Yeah but still it doesn't sound right. As soon as he started to walk off with her to go ride an elevator someone should have said something. TSA agents do nothing on their own there's always at least two of them and they never walk away from their post alone with passengers. I fly a lot....I just cannot see how this happened.

  9. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by S281Saleen160 View Post
    Yeah but still it doesn't sound right. As soon as he started to walk off with her to go ride an elevator someone should have said something. TSA agents do nothing on their own there's always at least two of them and they never walk away from their post alone with passengers. I fly a lot....I just cannot see how this happened.
    I fly a lot too, and I have seen some odd shit that TSA agents have done. It did say he was fired, so it sounds like it did happen...and they didn't mention another TSA employee, so he must have gotten her away from everyone else somehow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    I fly a lot too, and I have seen some odd shit that TSA agents have done. It did say he was fired, so it sounds like it did happen...and they didn't mention another TSA employee, so he must have gotten her away from everyone else somehow.
    Thats crazy. Good he got fired and should be in jail.
    I hate going thru check points bcz every time I have to get pat down bcz of all the mesh in my body from surgeries.

  11. #136
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    https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/14/polit...nvs/index.html

    Emilia Heckman trusted Dr. Robert Hadden.

    A fashion model in her late 20s, she found herself chatting casually about her family and career with the OB-GYN at Columbia University's prestigious hospital system, who showed her photos of his wife and daughters. She could catch him for appointments around her erratic schedule. She received free birth control from him.

    "I felt comfortable asking him any questions I had about my health," Heckman, now 36, said in an interview with CNN. "He was so open."

    But every once in a while, according to her interview and court documents, he would startle her with an inappropriate question or comment, asking about the quality of her sex life, or saying, "Your boyfriend is so lucky to have you."

    She says the comments also came during exams: "He would be crazy to lose you." "You're perfection."

    Heckman said it took a turn from inappropriate to unacceptable in 2012.

    As often, Heckman was the last patient of the day. Hadden told the nurse she could go home; she left reluctantly, looking troubled, Heckman said.

    Now it was just Hadden and Heckman, whose feet were in the stirrups and legs were draped. Hadden dipped his head out of view and licked her, she said.

    "At first it was gloves on, and all of that," Heckman said. "And then it transitioned to no gloves, a tongue and a beard. ... And I recoiled."

    She said she abruptly stepped off the exam table, got dressed, left the office and never returned.

    Heckman said she would later learn that she wasn't the only one.

    Three years later, in 2015, she came across a news story about how Hadden stood accused in a sex-abuse case involving six of his patients. Their allegations had mirrored hers: that Hadden had fondled and sexually assaulted them during examinations, after nurses had left the room. The next year, he pleaded guilty to two counts: criminal sexual act in the third degree and forcible touching.

    It seemed to be case closed.

    But this past January, Evelyn Yang, wife of former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang, came forward in an exclusive CNN interview, saying that she, too, was sexually abused by Hadden. Suddenly the terms of the plea deal sparked fresh outrage: Hadden had surrendered his medical license, but received no prison time, probation or community service.

    A torrent of critics blasted the Manhattan District Attorney's office for what they believe to be a light sentence.

    Since Yang's interview, nearly 40 new Hadden accusers have brought their allegations to attorney Anthony DiPietro, who filed a civil suit against Hadden and Columbia University in 2019. DiPietro says he plans to add them to the civil suit, which would bring the total number of plaintiffs to about 70. Two of the plaintiffs were minors -- ages 15 and 16 -- at the time of the alleged abuse, he said.

    Sexual assault survivors and their supporters held a protest in January saying the Hadden case proves Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance has failed in protecting victims.

    The New York City Council's women's caucus called for Vance's resignation, saying the Hadden plea deal fits a pattern of lenience by the DA towards wealthy, white men.

    Vance has refused CNN's multiple request for interviews. After CNN notified the office of Evelyn Yang's public allegations last month, Vance said in a statement, "Because a conviction is never a guaranteed outcome in a criminal trial, our primary concern was holding him accountable and making sure he could never do this again -- which is why we insisted on a felony conviction and permanent surrender of his medical license.

    "While we stand by our legal analysis and resulting disposition of this difficult case, we regret that this resolution has caused survivors pain," Vance said.

    His office has encouraged any survivors to call the DA's sex crimes unit.

    Heckman is among dozens of new accusers who want Hadden to be prosecuted again; she says she plans to present her case to the DA directly.
    "I want justice served," said Heckman. "He's raped, molested all these women and nothing's been done and that makes me furious."

    The 61-year-old Hadden has denied the assault allegations in court documents, aside from the two counts to which he pleaded guilty. CNN reached out to Hadden and the attorney who represented him in the civil case; those efforts were unsuccessful.

    "I'm thinking to myself ... I want his hands off of me."

    One of the new accusers is Jessica Chambers, now a substitute elementary-school teacher in Wyoming.

    Chambers was scrolling through her phone last month when she came across the news story about Yang. At the sight of a photo of Hadden in court, she said, her stomach knotted.

    "I was like, 'Holy sh*t,'" she said.

    Though she had seen nurse practitioners at Planned Parenthood, Chambers had never had a gynecological exam when she first stepped into Hadden's office in 2004. She was a 23-year-old student at the City College of New York.

    Her first impression: "He was very present. With some doctors, they just get you in and out. (But) he was just very there with you. ... He was very friendly."

    Chambers said two things initially struck her as odd during the exam, for which a chaperone was present: Hadden was chatty, and the procedure seemed to go on and on.

    "He had his fingers inside of me -- I couldn't see if he was wearing gloves," she said. "And he had an extended conversation with me while he had his fingers inside of me. ... I remember wanting to get out of that position."
    continued below

  12. #137
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    https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/14/polit...nvs/index.html

    Chambers said they talked about how she'd just broken up with her boyfriend. She remembers Hadden asking her if she was able to climax, "and how was I able to climax," she said.

    "I'm thinking it's very weird," she said. But "he's a doctor, we're in Columbia -- clearly what's going on here must be normal and natural."

    At some point, she said -- while she was sitting on the exam table, and after the chaperone had left -- he grabbed her leg.

    "There was an opening," she said. "Maybe I asked a question, and the question was license to physically show me."

    "He had me somewhat stuck," she said, adding that she felt uncomfortable, but "I didn't know whether it was just me being naive and I didn't want to do anything that would be weird."

    Hadden, she said, began explaining how arousal happens while extensively touching her vagina -- this time with ungloved hands.

    "I mean now, in hindsight, I'm like, he was trying to arouse me while talking to me -- under the guise of education," Chambers said. "I'm thinking to myself, this is enough -- I want his hands off of me. ... And it went on for -- it seemed like an extended period of time."

    Dr. David Shalowitz, who chairs the ethics committee of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, said allegations like the ones brought forth in the Hadden case are deeply concerning.

    "There are bright lines," he told CNN. "Ungloved rectal or genital exams are not acceptable ever. ... Any exam that's done should be with consent and a clear explanation for why it's being done. Patients have the right to refuse any procedure or exam, and patients should feel empowered to say no."

    Chambers said she would like to see Hadden face trial.

    "When you have this many people coming forward, I feel like you should be held to account again," she said. "And actually be held to account -- like, go to jail."

    DiPietro said all of his clients want the DA to reopen a criminal case against Hadden. He added that he plans to submit documentation to demand that Vance's office do so.
    "He got something that sounds [more] like an orchestrated retirement than an actual sentence for a serial sexual predator," DiPietro said.
    "It's like he knew ... that he was protected."

    Columbia has denied in legal filings the civil suit's allegations that the university did nothing to stop the "serial sexual abuse" on "countless occasions."

    In 2012, Hadden was arrested in his office after a patient told police that he had licked her vagina during an exam. The arrest was voided, and Hadden returned to his job at the medical clinic for more than a month. During that time, he allegedly assaulted Yang and at least one other patient.

    "Can you imagine the audacity of a man who continues to do this after being arrested?" Yang said. "It's like he knew that he wouldn't face any repercussions. That he was protected. That he wouldn't be fired."

    Columbia University responded to CNN's request for comment with a statement on Thursday, saying, "Nothing is more important to us than the safety of our patients. We are committed to treating every patient with respect and delivering care to the highest professional standards.

    "We condemn sexual misconduct in any form and extend our deepest apologies to the women whose trust Robert Hadden violated and to their families."

    Another accuser, who asked not to be named out of privacy concerns, said she was pregnant with her eldest when she went to see Hadden around 2002. She'd recently had a failed pregnancy while seeing a doctor at another hospital and didn't want to take chances. Thinking the prestigious New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center to be a safe bet, she went there and found Hadden based on a recommendation.

    Hadden, she said, asked her to come in to see him about once a month and gave her a vaginal and breast exam on almost every visit.
    "The breast exam was an excessive massage," she said.

    She remembers him asking strange questions, most notably if she enjoyed sex. In the midst of her pregnancy, the accuser said, she called a female friend who works as an OB-GYN to ask if the frequent breast and vaginal exams were normal.

    "Absolutely not," she recalled the friend saying. "That's weird."

    But she continued to go in, she said, because she didn't want to start over with another doctor, knowing through firsthand experience how fragile a pregnancy can be and wanting the best for her baby.

    "You feel the health of the child is in his hands," she said.

    She said she stopped seeing Hadden shortly after he delivered the baby.

    She, too, learned of other allegations only after seeing Yang's interview this past January, more than 16 years later.

    "I felt so validated," she told CNN, adding that Hadden's sentence "did not match the crime."

    "It wasn't even a slap on the wrist," she said.

    Hadden's 2016 plea deal is 'inexplicable''

    As a result of Hadden's 2016 plea deal, the doctor also registered as the lowest-level sex offender. This defied the recommendation of the State of New York Board of Examiners of Sex Offenders to label Hadden a Level 2 -- or moderate -- offender, which would require his inclusion in an online sex-offender registry for life.

    Elie Honig, a former federal and state prosecutor and a CNN legal analyst, called the 2016 agreement "inexplicable."

    "I cannot think of any legitimate reason why you would give this guy a plea deal that would not put him behind bars for one day," he said. "It is unjust."

    Whether Hadden can be tried on new criminal charges depends on the circumstance of each accuser. A provision in the Hadden plea agreement stipulates that the DA cannot prosecute any "similar crimes" against the doctor that the office knew about on or before February 22, 2016 -- the day the deal was struck.

    Honig called this clause "unusual," adding that it precludes women who served as witnesses or called the DA prior to that date from pursuing charges even if new evidence emerges.

    "The DA's office essentially said we're only going to prosecute for a few of you," Honig said. "The rest of you, sorry, we're giving it away."

    There is also uncertainty around the issue of statute of limitations for the new accusers who have come forward: While New York has recently expanded the timeframe allowing victims to come forward with some sex crimes allegations, it's unclear how that would impact the new accusations leveled against Hadden.

    Heckman said she first told her husband, media executive James Heckman, about the incident while on their honeymoon in Italy during the summer of 2015.

    That night, at her husband's urging, they searched for Hadden's name on Google; that is how they learned of the criminal case against the doctor.

    Heckman joined DiPietro's civil suit as a Jane Doe but decided to come forward with her full name after seeing Yang's interview.

    "I think the more victims come out and show their face -- 'Hey I'm a real person, I'm not just Jane Doe,' you know, maybe the DA will listen to that," Heckman said. "It's just like, we're real people, we're not just a piece of paper."

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    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/sh...id=mailsignout


    Janine, a nurse in Arizona, checked into the hospital for stomach surgery in 2017. Before the procedure, she told her physician that she did not want medical students to be directly involved. But after the operation, Janine said, as the anesthesia wore off, a resident came by to inform her that she had gotten her period; the resident had noticed while conducting a pelvic exam.
    a woman sitting on a bench: Ashley Weitz, who received an unauthorized pelvic exam in 2007, on the grounds of the Utah State Capitol. Last year she testified before the Utah Senate in favor of a bill requiring express consent for the procedure.? Lindsay D'Addato for The New York Times Ashley Weitz, who received an unauthorized pelvic exam in 2007, on the grounds of the Utah State Capitol. Last year she testified before the Utah Senate in favor of a bill requiring express consent for the procedure.

    “What pelvic exam?” Janine, 33, asked. Distressed, she tried to piece together what had happened while she was unconscious. Why had her sexual organs been inspected during an abdominal operation, by a medical student? Later, she said, her physician explained that the operating team had seen she was due for a Pap smear.

    Janine burst into tears. “I started having panic attacks trying to figure out what had happened,” she recalled in an interview. “I have a history of sexual abuse, and it brought up bad memories.”

    She felt especially unnerved as a medical professional: “Patients put such trust in the medical profession, especially on sensitive topics such as going under anesthesia.” (Janine asked that she be identified only by her middle name. The hospital declined to comment on its policies regarding informed consent for pelvic exams.)

    Pelvic exams necessitate physical inspection of the most sensitive areas of a woman’s body. The exams are typically conducted while the patient is awake and consenting at a gynecologist visit, to screen for certain cancers, infections and other reproductive health issues.

    But across many U.S. states and medical institutions, physicians are not required to obtain explicit consent for the procedure. Sometimes the exams are conducted — by doctors or doctors-in-training — while women are under anesthesia for gynecological and other operations. Often the exams are deemed medically necessary, but in some cases they are done solely for the educational benefit of medical trainees. At some hospitals, physicians discuss the procedure with patients beforehand or detail its specifics in consent forms, but at others the women are left unaware.
    a woman posing for a picture: Sarah Wright, a science teacher, in her home in Madison, Wis. In most states, it is legal for a medical student to perform a pelvic exam on a woman who is under anesthesia; Ms. Wright believes this happened to her during a surgery in 2009.? Taylor Glascock for The New York Times Sarah Wright, a science teacher, in her home in Madison, Wis. In most states, it is legal for a medical student to perform a pelvic exam on a woman who is under anesthesia; Ms. Wright believes this happened to her during a surgery in 2009.

    There are no numbers to indicate how many pelvic exams have been performed nationwide without consent, but regional surveys suggest that the practice is not uncommon. A 2005 survey at the University of Oklahoma found that a majority of medical students had performed pelvic exams on unconscious patients, and in nearly 3 of 4 instances they thought informed consent had not been obtained.

    Phoebe Friesen, a biomedical ethicist at McGill University, drew attention to the issue in 2018 with articles in Bioethics and Slate, which elicited stories from other women with the hashtag #MeTooPelvic. Dr. Friesen learned about the subject while leading a bioethics seminar at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York, where she heard a narrative from some students that amounted to, “I can put my hand in this woman’s vagina because it helps with my training.”

    Sarah Wright, a science teacher in Madison, Wis., said she was given a diagnosis of extreme vulvar sensitivity after a surgery in 2009. She wondered how an operation performed through incisions in her abdomen could have affected her sexual organs, and concluded that either a uterine manipulator was used or a pelvic exam was conducted without her knowledge. So when scheduling another operation with University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health’s hospital system in 2018, she asked to draft her own consent contract.
    a person wearing a black shirt: Robin Fretwell Wilson, a professor of law and associate dean at University of Illinois College of Law, has advocated for informed consent laws: “We know we shouldn’t treat women’s bodies like they’re somebody’s property, and that extends to medicine.”? Rachel Woolf for The New York Times Robin Fretwell Wilson, a professor of law and associate dean at University of Illinois College of Law, has advocated for informed consent laws: “We know we shouldn’t treat women’s bodies like they’re somebody’s property, and that extends to medicine.”

    “A woman unconscious on an operating table is at her most vulnerable,” Ms. Wright said. “If anyone is going to be penetrating the vagina with their hands or an instrument, that needs to be disclosed.”

    She said department administrators rebuffed her request. “They told me: ‘Is this a deal breaker for you? Because if so, you should have your surgery somewhere else.’” Last month, Ms. Wright testified before the Wisconsin legislature in favor of a bill on informed consent.

    The University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health declined to comment on the specifics of Ms. Wright’s case. In 2019, the School of Medicine and Public Health adopted a new policy requiring doctors to obtain informed consent before allowing students to perform sensitive exams, which must be related to routine care, on anesthetized patients.

    “The formalization of the sensitive-exam policy provides clear, specific and universally employed standards for consent processes for breast, pelvic, urogenital, prostate and rectal exams,” said Dr. Laurel Rice, Chair of University of Wisconsin Health’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    Last year, the United States saw a wave of bills banning unauthorized pelvic exams in 11 states. Maryland, Utah, New York and Delaware passed laws mandating informed consent, joining six states with prior regulations on the books. A number of medical institutions have their own policies in place.

    “We know we shouldn’t treat women’s bodies like they’re somebody’s property, and that extends to medicine,” said Robin Fretwell Wilson, a professor of law and associate dean at University of Illinois College of Law, who has been a longtime advocate for informed consent laws. “With the ‘Me Too’ movement, we’re at a moment in time where we’re realizing that.”


  14. #139
    It was aliens raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Continued from above:
    Sounding an alarm

    That moment of realization has been long in coming. Nearly three decades ago, Dr. Ari Silver-Isenstadt was a medical student at the University of Pennsylvania. Just before his gynecological clerkship, a friend cautioned him that he would probably be asked to perform pelvic exams on unconscious female patients.

    Dr. Silver-Isenstadt nervously discussed the prospect with his wife, who was studying for her doctorate in the history of medicine. The pair devised a plan: He would show up late for each day’s gynecological operation, conveniently missing the introductory portion when a pelvic exam might be performed.

    After several weeks, he was reported to the medical school dean, and he worked out an arrangement to finish the course without conducting pelvic exams on anesthetized patients. But he kept a troubled eye on the practice. In 2003, Dr. Silver-Isenstadt was co-author of a study titled “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He surveyed 401 students at five Pennsylvania medical schools and found that 90 percent had performed pelvic exams on anesthetized patients. Completing a gynecological clerkship, he found, was associated with a reduced appreciation of the importance of consent for the procedure.

    As Dr. Silver-Isenstadt tried to sound the alarm on the practice, he learned that medical faculty members tended to accept it as a necessary component of a physician’s training. Although the practice has broadly persisted, a number of states passed laws banning it, some citing his paper: California in 2003, Illinois in 2004, Virginia in 2007, Oregon in 2011, Hawaii in 2012 and Iowa in 2017.

    “The general public has no awareness of it,” Dr. Silver-Isenstadt said. “When I talked to my colleagues in medicine about it, it didn’t seem like a red flag to them.

    Ryan O’Keefe, a fourth-year medical student in Pennsylvania, recently completed his gynecological rotation. He said students were frequently instructed to perform pelvic exams on anesthetized patients; they were told to check the consent forms that patients signed before the operation, although he said he “would not be surprised if now and then people didn’t check.”

    What was most unsettling to Mr. O’Keefe were the racial and socioeconomic disparities apparent in his pelvic exam training.

    Mr. O’Keefe’s rotation crossed between two clinics in Philadelphia. On one side of the street was a pearly white high-rise serving patients with private insurance, Penn Medicine Washington Square. On the other side was the more run-down Ludmir Center for Women’s Health, primarily for those on Medicaid and the uninsured. At the private insurance clinic, Mr. O’Keefe said, medical students mostly observed as their residents conducted gynecological procedures. At Ludmir, the quality of care was high, but Mr. O’Keefe noted that students were encouraged to get more hands-on experience, especially by stepping in to perform pelvic exams.

    “My first experience doing a pelvic exam was in Ludmir, where it’s expected that medical students will do it,” he said. He recalled anxiously maneuvering his hands as he looked to the resident for guidance.

    “It leaves a strange feeling in your gut, because it’s the most obvious example of how there’s different standards of care depending on your insurance status,” he said. “It’s like a tale of two clinics.”

    A spokesman for the University of Pennsylvania’s Health System said the Perelman School of Medicine includes a dedicated session on health disparities in its obstetrics and gynecology rotation, and the school’s policy mandates that students can only perform pelvic exams under the direct supervision and at the discretion of an attending or resident physician. The spokesman said that the school “will review this matter to ensure that all patients are treated equally in accordance with our institutional policies and values.”

    ‘Is this a nightmare?’

    For medical students, performing unauthorized exams can leave a sense of discomfort that fades with time. But for the patients, the scars can run deeper, sometimes rupturing their sense of trust in health care providers.

    One evening in 2007, Ashley Weitz drove to a Salt Lake City emergency room, at Intermountain Healthcare LDS Hospital, suffering from uncontrollable vomiting. She was given an ultrasound and blood work, the standard approach; her attending physician ran through a list of possible ailments. Then he asked if he could run a test for sexually transmitted infections. Ms. Weitz declined, explaining that she was celibate and a childhood abuse survivor, and that she preferred to forgo the exam.

    The doctor gave her Phenergan, a sedative. Later, she returned to consciousness with her feet in metal stirrups and a speculum inside of her, cold and foreign. Ms. Weitz cried out in discomfort. She recalled that the doctor responded, “Hang on, I’m almost finished.”

    “I remember feeling pain and confusion, like, ‘Is this a nightmare?’” Ms. Weitz, 36, said. “I was very sleepy and sedated. My next memory is looking over and he was bagging the swabs he had collected without my permission.”

    Ms. Weitz said that she would have been comfortable with an exam if she had been given a better explanation of its purpose: “If the doctor had more of a conversation with me, I probably would have consented. It was the absence of consent that made this a trauma.”

    Ms. Weitz testified before the Utah legislature in favor of an informed consent bill, which was signed into law last year. A spokesman for Intermountain Healthcare said that its “caregivers do not perform exams or procedures, including pelvic area exams without informed consent in accordance with current Utah law.”

    Ms. Wilson interviewed medical faculty members in more than a dozen states to gauge the opposition to informed consent policies. She found that doctors often argued that patients implicitly consented to being enlisted in medical teaching when visiting a teaching hospital, or that consent for one gynecological procedure encompassed consent for any additional, related exams.

    Last March, the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics released a statement recommending that students perform exams on anesthetized women only when “explicitly consented to” and “related to the planned procedure.”

    But some medical professionals are dismayed to see the issue legislated rather than negotiated through direct conversation between doctors and their patients.

    Dr. Jennifer Goedken, an obstetrician-gynecologist at Emory University, said working in a teaching hospital showed her the importance of giving students hands-on experience with pelvic exams and she initially worried that legislative debates could stigmatize the procedure.

    “As doctors that care about women’s health, we don’t want to relegate pelvic exams to something that’s taboo,” Dr. Goedken said. “We want students to learn how to recognize abnormalities and do a good, comfortable exam.” Pelvic exams, she added, are one of the least risky procedures, involving just hands or the blunt end of a speculum, and are critical for reproductive health care.

    Sarah Burns, a third-year student at the Ohio State University College of Medicine, said of practicing pelvic exams, “It’s like learning to drive.” Repeated experience is necessary to master the delicate skills, and to overcome the nerves that accompany initial attempts.

    But among students now learning to perform pelvic exams, there is a growing awareness of the need to tend to the patient’s psychological and emotional well-being.

    Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Massachusetts, where the method is utilized, also uses consent forms that specify that patients may undergo pelvic exams while anesthetized.

    “We let them know what the procedure entails and we vocalize every member who will be participating in it,” said gynecologist Dr. Deborah Bartz. “We think carefully about which patient needs a pelvic exam under anesthesia, who needs to perform it and why.” This has been the hospital’s policy for several years, she said, but it has been more strictly enforced in the last year, to ensure that no procedures are done without transparency or without the patient’s explicit consent.

    Many hospitals now work with gynecological teaching associates, or G.T.A.s, who allow students to practice pelvic exams on them as they offer guidance.

    Dr. Deborah Bartz, a gynecologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Massachusetts, explained that medical students learn different skills from practicing pelvic exams on conscious and unconscious patients. Examining conscious patients teaches them to listen and respond to feedback; with anesthetized patients, the muscles are relaxed, which makes it easier to feel the ovaries and uterus.

    Some medical institutions, including Brigham and Women’s, are now utilizing a method known as trauma-informed care, which emphasizes informed consent and delicate use of language to respect survivors.

    Last year, Ms. Weitz revisited her experience with an unauthorized exam as she prepared for her testimony before the Utah Senate, rereading her doctor’s report from that night in the emergency room.

    Words floated in front of her: “She is quite somnolent,” “I performed a pelvic exam,” “The patient is adamant that she has never had any kind of sexual encounter that could result in an S.T.D.” Ms. Weitz felt dizzy.

    “It put words to this feeling I had for so long, that I had been vulnerable and disrespected,” she said. “I’m not associating all health care with assault, but I have a good reason to associate some health care with trauma. Health care providers are not exempt from that ethical obligation to have obtained consent.”

  15. #140
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    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinio...ve-ncna1137571

    In January 2015, Capitol Nashville artist Mickey Guyton released her debut single “Better Than You Left Me” to country radio. USA Today proclaimed that the singer’s “powerhouse vocals could provide a rallying point for programmers hoping to break the bro-country logjam.” But despite rave reviews, Gruyton has yet to become a household name. Perhaps that’s because, as Guyton recently revealed on Twitter, her “powerhouse” single was dropped from playlists after being told that country radio didn’t feel like it had room for two ballads by two female artists.

    The sad thing about this is when my song Better than you left me came out and was working and was going up the charts, I was told that country radio didn’t want to play 2 ballads by 2 females at the same time. So they played one girl and quit playing mine. It was heartbreaking.
    — Mickey Guyton (@MickeyGuyton) December 19, 2019

    This type of story — of the limited space for women — is all too common in country music. For years, women have been told that there is only one spot for women on playlists and label rosters, that they should avoid releasing ballads, that their music isn’t good enough and that their songs cannot be played back-to-back.

    In a May 2015 interview, a radio consultant encouraged program directors to limit the number of songs by women in their playlists to make ratings. Women were referred to as the “tomatoes” of an all-male (the lettuce) salad. In other words, women are the garnish and their music should be played sparingly. Much has been written about what is now referred to as #TomatoGate, but little has changed for women in country music. In January, “Full Frontal With Samantha Bee” investigated the phenomenon and confirmed, surprise surprise, almost nothing has changed.

    For years, women have been told that there is only one spot for women on playlists and label rosters and that their songs cannot be played back-to-back.

    In a series of studies published in consultation with the woman’s advocacy group WOMAN Nashville, I dug into airplay data to better understand how songs by women factor into radio programming. The results were startling. The studies revealed a 66 percent decline in the number of songs by women on the Yearend Airplay reports between 2000 and 2018, as well as significant disparity in the total spins (plays) accorded to songs by men and women — increasing from a 2 to 1 ratio in 2000 to 9.7 to 1 in 2018. A second study parsed the spin counts by their time of day, revealing that songs by women received just 8.9 percent of the daytime spins in 2018.

    The situation remained relatively unchanged in 2019. My latest research shows a minor increase in the number of songs by women on weekly charts by the end of the year, but little change at the level of song rotation. Focusing on airplay data for 2019, I found a 1.2 percent increase in daily spins for songs by women last year, from 8.9 percent in 2018 to 10.1 percent in 2019. Unfortunately, the distribution in the daytime remains nearly identical over the last two years. In fact, the 1.2 percent increase occurred in the evening and overnight time slots. Any increase in the amount of spins for songs by women in 2019 is thus neutralized by the time of day when the songs are played. As a result, the potential impact on an audience is negligible and women’s voices continue to be nearly invisible to radio listeners.

    This type of programming marginalizes female artists and ghettoizes their songs to time slots that have the lowest percentage of listeners — i.e. when the majority of the listening audience is sleeping. In fact, women were so overwhelmingly underrepresented in 2019 that it was likely that listeners could tune-in to their local station for over an hour and not hear a single song by a woman.

    Why does this matter? First, there is a direct relationship between the amount of times a song is played each day and its ability to break into the weekly charts. With just 10 percent of the daily spins in 2019, it should not be surprising to know that according to my calculations only 16.7 percent of the songs on the BillboardCountry Airplay charts were by women, and songs by women are nearly absent from the top positions of the chart — with an average of 10 percent of the songs in both the top 20 and top 10 positions of the weekly charts. Airplay and chart activity is crucial exposure for artists — especially new artists, as it is linked to other opportunities, including label and publishing deals, touring and festival opportunities, award nominations, fan clubs, merchandising and more. Naturally, the declining presence of women on radio evolves into a sustained, industry-wide deficit.
    Why anyone would want to listen to country music anyway is beyond me.

  16. #141
    Senior Member Nic B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinio...ve-ncna1137571



    Why anyone would want to listen to country music anyway is beyond me.
    Ugh, same, I can't stand country.


    Quote Originally Posted by marakisses View Post
    yes i said i will leave it under you storage he said cuddle with me i said shut up it over??? what am i doing wrong??

  17. #142
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    Part of me wants to catch up on this thread. The other part of me thinks it will give me serious anger things so I'll just follow new posts from here on out.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

  18. #143
    It was aliens raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Following up on the story from the previous page:

    https://www.mcall.com/news/breaking/...36m-story.html


    The Monroe County groom charged with assaulting a bridesmaid two days before his wedding will now be charged with attempted rape, prosecutors said in court Wednesday.

    Joined by his wife and in-laws, Daniel J. Carney, 28, of Stroudsburg, appeared at a preliminary hearing on charges related to the allegations. Prior to the start of the hearing, prosecutors said they would withdraw involuntary deviate sexual intercourse charges and would instead charge him with attempted rape, attempted sexual assault and aggravated indecent assault. He is also charged with simple assault and indecent assault.

    Carney gave up his right to a preliminary hearing on those charges. He is free on $100,000 unsecured bail.

    Monroe County District Attorney E. David Christine said after Wednesday’s hearing the charges were refiled after the accuser reflected on what exactly happened to her, adding that she was intoxicated and had “suffered trauma” during the attack.

    The accuser, a 29-year-old woman from Oregon, reported the incident the day after the Sept. 1 wedding when she went to Lehigh Valley Hospital-Pocono and told hospital staff that she had been sexually assaulted, according to a criminal complaint.

    During their investigation, state troopers viewed surveillance footage that showed Carney pulling the woman into a locker room and reviewed text messages and a phone call in which Carney apologized to her, police said.

    A trooper interviewed Carney, and he said he was extremely intoxicated the night of Aug. 30, and initially said he “felt like he was taken advantage of by the victim,” according to court records. He later changed his story and admitted he had actually grabbed her arms and pulled her in, police said.

    Walking hand in hand with his wife, Carney refused to comment after Wednesday’s hearing. His attorney, James Swetz, said there would have been a hearing if the complainant had attended.

    “We will challenge the legal sufficiency of the charges at the appropriate time,” he said, adding, “Anytime there is an accusation against someone, it’s difficult to handle but everybody has their day in court and he will and so will she.”

    According to a criminal complaint:

    The accuser told investigators that the wedding party had been drinking and rafting down the Delaware River on Aug. 30. She said she became very drunk after three beers and one or two shots of vodka and could not maintain her position on a paddle board and continually fell into the water.

    She was placed on a raft and had difficulty remembering what happened after that, she told police. She said other members of the wedding party and friends filled her in on what happened next, saying they arrived at Shawnee Inn at 8 p.m.

    She was unable to stand on her own, so Carney’s fiancee told him to help her out of the raft and into the parking lot.

    The accuser said she remembered being led away from the water and waking up in the locker room with Carney biting her and forcefully grabbing her. She told police she blacked out a second time and woke up to Carney on top of her and her bikini bottoms pulled off.

    She then remembered Carney’s fiancee walking into the locker room and screaming at him. She said another bridesmaid helped her out of the locker room.

    In interviews with other witnesses, police learned the accuser was extremely drunk and incoherent when they found her in the shower. Police also learned that Carney and his fiancee got into a fight in the parking lot.

    A state trooper tracked down security footage from the inn, which showed the accuser and Carney walking down a hallway. The trooper said the woman appeared extremely unsteady on her feet and was swaying. At one point, Carney turned around and pulled her into the locker room, the footage showed. Twenty minutes later, Carney’s fiancee entered the room and Carney left immediately.

    On the morning of the wedding, Carney texted the woman and apologized, asking “can we just be as happy as possible” for his fiancee. He also asked her if she could take emergency day-after contraception, just in case.

    After getting approval from the district attorney’s office, police listened in on a call between Carney and the accuser. During the call, police said, Carney told the woman that they did not have sex, but admitted sexually assaulting her. He repeatedly apologized and said it was his fault. He also admitted he led her into the locker room.
    Also, I see that he's a CPA. You can't have ANY kind of record and be a CPA, even a misdemeanor can get your license pulled or denied. I hope his license is at least suspended.
    Last edited by raisedbywolves; 02-18-2020 at 09:13 AM.

  19. #144
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    https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/18/polit...uct/index.html

    Kansas federal judge resigns after sexual misconduct allegations

    A federal district court judge in Kansas who was publicly admonished last fall for sexual misconduct and having an extramarital affair resigned on Tuesday.
    In a letter to President Donald Trump, US District Judge Carlos Murguia of the District of Kansas offered his resignation and expressed "profound apologies."
    "In recent months, it has become clear that I can no longer effectively serve the Court in this capacity," he said.
    Murguia's resignation comes following congressional committee hearings last week on efforts by the judiciary to protect judicial employees from sexual harassment, and after a panel of judges in September publicly admonished him for behavior they said could have put him at risk of "extortion."

    Murguia, who had served as a district judge since 1999, stepped down with "a heavy heart and profound apologies, out of respect for the federal judiciary, my colleagues, my community and — most importantly — my family," he said in the letter.

    A special committee that investigated allegations against Murguia found that he had sexually harassed female employees, made "sexually suggestive" comments and sent "inappropriate texts" often late into the night, according to an order released by the court in September.

    The order also said all of the harassed employees said they had been reluctant to tell Murguia to stop his behavior "because of the power he held as a federal judge." One employee told him to stop his behavior, but he continued, the order says.

    In a significant note, the judicial council thought Murguia's actions were "too serious and the importance of maintaining the integrity of the Judiciary in the mind of the public too important for a private reprimand." Sexual misconduct allegations against federal judges rarely become public, even belatedly, and rarely are judges who misbehave subject to any sanction, a 2018 CNN study found.

    The issue received renewed visibility when a woman who served as a law clerk to a federal appeals court judge who died in 2018 told Congress on Thursday that she was sexually harassed by her former boss and that systems set up by the judiciary to report instances of sexual allegations are inadequate.

    The new allegations from Olivia Warren, a lawyer who clerked for Judge Stephen Reinhardt in 2017 and 2018 and now works on death penalty litigation, came during a House subcommittee hearing focused on protecting federal judicial employees from sexual harassment.

    She described Reinhardt as someone who "demeaned his employees, a man who demeaned women and a man who sexually harassed me." She recounted a series of inappropriate comments as well as a crude drawing displayed in chambers.

  20. #145
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    https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/21/world...gbr/index.html

    British backpacker Grace Millane was strangled to death, crammed into a suitcase and buried in a New Zealand woodland after a Tinder date in December 2018.
    On Thursday her killer, a 28-year-old man, was sentenced to life imprisonment with minimum 17 year non-parole period.

    In his November 2019 trial, the prosecution argued that the man -- whose name cannot be released due to a suppression order -- "eroticized" Millane's death because of a "morbid sexual interest," and the court heard how he had taken "trophy" photos of her body and watched violent pornography while her body lay in the room.

    The key pillar of the man's defense was that Millane, 21, enjoyed "rough sex," and that her death was an accident that came about as a result of consensual choking. As a consequence, media coverage of the trial was filled with details about Millane's personal life and alleged sexual preferences, even as the accused remained anonymous.

    Claims of a "sex game gone wrong" are not new. Some politicians and media outlets have even begun to refer to them as the "50 Shades" defense, after the popular "50 Shades of Grey" books and movies, which recount a woman's relationship with a man who introduces her to BDSM (bondage, discipline, sadism, and masochism) sexual practices.

    At least 60 UK women have been killed in episodes of so-called "consensual" sexual violence since 1972, with at least 18 women dying in the last five years, according to the advocacy group We Can't Consent To This.

    In 45% of those killings, the claim that a woman's injuries were sustained during a sex game "gone wrong" resulted in a lesser charge, a lighter sentence, an acquittal, or the death not being investigated, the group said.

    Susan Edwards, a barrister and professor of law at the University of Buckingham, told CNN that 30 or 40 years ago, it was unlikely that a defendant would claim that the victim consented to sexual violence.

    "He would be less likely then, I think, to try and use as an excuse that she had consented to sexual violence," said Edwards, who has been tracking and working on domestic violence cases since the 1980s.

    "And if he had, then it would have been extremely doubted -- it wouldn't have gone in any way to his credit that he was trying to use such a totally unbelievable excuse," she added.

    "Now, regrettably, there are some people that might be willing to believe it because we now live in a world where some people are tolerating this commercial sexualization of violence," she added.

    Now, claiming an assault or homicide was a case of "rough sex gone wrong" would not work as a defense, Edwards said, but could have some "mitigatory impact" on a defendant's culpability, and sentencing. In some cases, defendants could be handed sentences with no jail time.

    "To establish murder, there has to be intention. So, if they can convince the jury that there was no intention to kill, then the verdict will be one of manslaughter," added Edwards, who has been working to make strangulation a standalone offense in the UK. In the UK, strangulation or choking is only charged if it occurs in the course of committing some other indictable offense, such as rape.

    Non-fatal strangulation by an intimate partner is considered an important "risk factor" for the homicide of women, indicating a greater likelihood that they will eventually be killed. A 2008 study conducted by researchers at Johns Hopkins University and the University of Virginia found that experiencing a non-fatal strangulation by an intimate partner made a woman six times more likely to be the victim of an attempted murder and seven times more likely to be the victim of homicide. Two thirds of the cases We Can't Consent to This studied involved strangulation, the group's founder, Fiona Mackenzie, told CNN.

    Making strangulation an offense in and of itself would, Edwards says, be an important step in protecting women.
    "An offense of strangulation would recognize the potential seriousness -- the threat and fear occasioned. Otherwise, it is lost in common assault, or assault, which does not take into consideration the life threatening potential or the degree of fear that is created for the victim," she added.

    "That would send a symbolic message that this behavior isn't tolerated, and hopefully would be part of a preventive measure that would prevent the escalation of these cases which result in death," Edwards told CNN.

    Claims of rough sex gone wrong are a global concern.

    "We've got a list of around 250 women who have been killed in various countries around the world by men who claim at some point that they consented to it. It seems to be especially common in places like Germany, Canada, the US, Australia, Portugal and Spain," Mackenzie told CNN. She said that cases in which defendants allege consensual rough sex follow a similar pattern in other countries as they do in the UK -- often, the deaths are not initially investigated as crimes, and if men are prosecuted, they will be prosecuted for manslaughter, receive light sentences, and in some cases, walk free.

    In June 2019, a district court in Bielefeld, northwest Germany handed a 48-year-old man a 10-year prison sentence for the manslaughter of his wife. The defendant told the court that the couple regularly practiced strangulation during sexual intercourse, and claimed that his wife could only climax when he throttled her -- his comments were initially disregarded by the district court as degrading to the victim, but the High Court later ruled that they formed an admissible part of his defense.

    In November 2019, Germany's federal court of justice ruled that the prison sentence handed to the man should be reconsidered because the defendant's claims that his wife enjoyed being strangled during sex were not an "aggravating fact" in the case.

    A spokesperson for the Bundesgerichtshof told CNN that a regional court will now resentence the man.

    In Canada too, activists and experts are concerned about the proliferation of similar cases.

    Lise Gotell, a professor of women's and gender studies at the University of Alberta began compiling data on the use of the "rough sex" defenses after a number of high-profile cases came to court.

    In a preliminary search of trials heard by a judge alone, and of pretrial motions, Gotell found more than 100 cases -- including non-fatal assaults, sexual assaults and homicide -- in which the defendant claimed the woman had consented to violent sex. More than half of the cases, she said, came after 2015.

    "We're not talking about consensual BDSM in most, nearly all, of the cases. These are situations of unconsensual violent sex, if not intentional murders, in which the defendants are trying to get off in using this defense," she told CNN.

    Though Canada has seen numerous cases of sexual violence, one case in particular -- the killing of Cindy Gladue -- has sparked outrage.

    Gladue, an Indigenous mother of three, bled to death in a hotel room from an 11-centimeter wound in her vaginal wall in 2011. In a murder trial, prosecutors argued that Bradley Barton, who had paid for sex with Gladue for two consecutive nights, "cut the inside of her vagina with a sharp object with intent to seriously harm or kill her."Although he admitted causing Gladue's death, Barton denied using a sharp object, and said he believed she consented to the sexual activities, claiming her death was a non-culpable accident.

    Court documents note that throughout the trial, Barton testified "at length" about his sexual activity with Gladue the night before her death. Canada's Supreme Court noted that Gladue was repeatedly referred to as a "Native prostitute" by both the defense and the prosecution -- this, the Supreme Court said, had "devastatingly prejudicial effects" on the outcome of the case, and did not dissuade "prejudicial and stereotypical assumptions about Indigenous women working in the sex trade."
    Acquitted of murder, Barton will now face trial for manslaughter.

    Elizabeth Sheehy, professor emeritus at the University of Ottawa's Faculty of Law, told CNN that a woman's sexual history is often used by defense lawyers in criminal trials.


  21. #146
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    continued from above post

    "I think the allegation in and of itself, particularly if prior sexual history of the victim is used, has the ability to damage a woman's credibility, even if there's no kind of official recognition," said Sheehy, who has taught criminal and sexual assault law for more than 34 years.

    "To allege that a woman likes rough sex is to damage her credibility. I think that will have an impact on our ability to hold perpetrators accountable. I also worry that it normalizes this form of violence," she told CNN.

    According to UN data, at least 87,000 women worldwide were intentionally killed in 2017, with more than half (50,000) of them killed by intimate partners or family members.

    Advocates and experts say a culture of victim-blaming is getting in the way of justice.

    "In every case, the woman's sexual history, alleged sexual history, is presented in court as part of the justification for her killing ... the victim-blaming and reporting on it is the same wherever you go," Mackenzie told CNN.

    "Women are blamed for their behavior," said Toni Van Pelt, president of the National Organization for Women (NOW). "Their sex lives are always questioned -- whether or not they are sexually active, and what kind of sexual activity do they participate in, and were they drinking -- these things that have nothing to do with what's happened to them."'

    "There's no emphasis on the men, and the male behavior. Where is their sexual history, where is their history of violence against women, were they drinking, were they stalking, have they been in jail for this before? The emphasis is that she deserved it, because she enjoyed or had pleasure from sex," Van Pelt added.

    Experts say this victim-blaming is exacerbated by the normalization of sexual violence in culture and media.
    "The commercialization of sexual violence is relevant in every plot almost, of a book or film or media -- that enables the male perpetrator to rely on those kinds of discourses and narratives," Edwards said.

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    https://www.sltrib.com/news/2020/02/...aying-no-here/


    A Utah sixth grader and her family are challenging her middle school’s rules after she was not allowed to say “no” to a boy who asked her to dance on Valentine’s Day.

    Azlyn Hobson was “thrilled and nervous” for the Valentine’s Day dance at Rich Middle School in Laketown in northern Utah’s Rich County, said her mother, Alicia.

    "She was so excited for this dance. She was telling me about it for two weeks," Alicia Hobson said. "There was a boy at school she liked, she wanted to dance with him, she was going to have the best time ever."

    Instead, Azlyn said, another boy asked her to dance — a boy that had made her uncomfortable in the past. So she said no.

    Then the principal ran over to her.

    “He was like, ‘You guys go dance. There’s no saying no in here,’” Azlyn recalled. The principal shooed them onto the dance floor for what Azlyn said was a painfully awkward partner dance.

    "I just didn't like it at all," the 11-year-old said. "When they finally said it was done, I was like, 'Yes!'"

    After Azlyn came home angry, her mother emailed Principal Kip Motta.

    "She ALWAYS has the right to say no," Alicia Hobson wrote. "Boys don't have the right to touch girls or make them dance with them. They don't. If girls are taught that they don't have the right to say no to boys, or that saying no is meaningless, because they'll be forced to do it anyway, we will have another generation who feels that rape culture is completely normal."

    Motta replied that students who are concerned about dancing with certain classmates should raise it with him before dances and he would be able to intervene, Hobson said.

    "We want to protect every child's right to be safe and comfortable at school," Motta said in an interview. "We believe in that 100%. We also believe that all children should be included in activities. The reason for the policy as we have had it (in the) past is to make sure no kids feel like they get left out."

  23. #148
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    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...hants-n1150001

    Female high school hockey player taunted with gender reveal sign, chants she's 'a dude'

    A Pennsylvania high school hockey player was taunted last week by opposing fans with a sign prompting her to "reveal" her gender and chants calling her a "dude" during a championship game in Lehigh Valley.

    Alyssa Wruble, the only girl on the Northampton Area High School varsity hockey team, was playing in a championship game against Parkland High School of Allentown on Feb. 26 when she heard the chants attacking her gender. In a post about the incident Saturday on Facebook, Donna Bloss, Alyssa's aunt, included photos of a sign that read "Alyssa gender reveal?" with the signs for male and female.

    "The level of unsportsmanlike conduct during these several championship games was mind boggling," Bloss said in her post. "I've toyed with whether or not to even put this out there for fear of upsetting my niece even further but she knows this was done out of sheer jealousy."

    Alyssa, 17, told Fox affiliate WTXF of Philadelphia on Tuesday that the chants were so loud that the entire student section must have been participating.

    "When I skated over, all I heard was 'Wruble, you're a dude,' and apparently my uncle and aunt and also my father heard them say I have a penis," Alyssa told the station.

    Alyssa, who scored two goals during the game, said she wants an apology from the people who were responsible for the sign.

    "Any girl should be allowed to be as good as a guy," she said. "It shouldn't matter what gender they are. If they want to play a sport, you should let them, you shouldn't bring them down for wanting to go do something they love."

    Parkland Ice Hockey President Mike Byelick stepped down from his position in the wake of the incident and said the team did not condone the sign, according to The Express-Times newspaper of Easton.

  24. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...hants-n1150001

    Female high school hockey player taunted with gender reveal sign, chants she's 'a dude'
    This is my area but I didn't hear about it....I probably just missed the story. Northampton getting a taste of their own medicine, that is a racist school/town they hate black people. And Parkland is the school for rich white kids.

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    https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/06/sport...ntl/index.html

    Sexist abuse of AFL Women's players has become so bad a newspaper is shutting down its comments section

    An Australian newspaper has shut down comments on its coverage of the women's Australian Football League, after being inundated with sexist remarks and trolling.
    The Herald Sun said it took the step after receiving "vile" abuse directed at the athletes and journalists covering the sport, a problem that a handful of AFL Women's stars have spoken out about.

    "If you don't like something, no one is forcing you to read, or watch, or engage," the paper wrote in an editorial explaining its decision. "Some of the comments that our athletes are subjected to are simply too vile to publish.

    "The least offensive of the comments runs to the tune of 'get back in the kitchen', and the worst cannot be repeated they are so objectionable," Herald Sun head of sport Matt Kitchin added.

    "It makes the environment so unpleasant that it makes perfect sense that readers wouldn't want to engage with the stories."

    Kitchin said AFL clubs and players had appealed to the newspaper to turn off its comments, adding that one story had almost 300 comments of a "grossly sexist tone."

    The women's AFL league was set up in 2016 to compliment the long-running men's league, which is avidly followed in several parts of Australia and has been a national obsession for decades.

    Last year, a controversy erupted after broadcaster Channel 7 stopped running a picture of Tayla Harris taken during a game, following a flood of derogatory comments directed towards the star player.

    Harris received a swell of online support and thousands more followers, while Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison called the trolls "cowardly grubs."
    "Some take time out of their day to question whether trolls even exist, and whether commentary surrounding negativity is all just a big conspiracy," the Herald Sun's editorial said. "Trust me, we've heard and read them all. You're not original."

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