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Thread: GOLDEN STATE KILLER CAUGHT!

  1. #51
    Cranjis McBasketball Nic B's Avatar
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    DA: DNA from genealogy website led to Joseph DeAngelo's arrest

    http://www.kcra.com/article/da-dna-f...rrest/20078221


    Quote Originally Posted by marakisses View Post
    yes i said i will leave it under you storage he said cuddle with me i said shut up it over??? what am i doing wrong??

  2. #52
    Senior Member DiaDeLosMuertos's Avatar
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    This is crazy! WOW Berm that list is extensive. I am just blown away.
    Jenn

  3. #53
    Senior Member WhiskeyGirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    DA: DNA from genealogy website led to Joseph DeAngelo's arrest

    http://www.kcra.com/article/da-dna-f...rrest/20078221
    I came back to post this! Here's another article: http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/l...426-story.html

  4. #54
    Senior Member Jezebelle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    DA: DNA from genealogy website led to Joseph DeAngelo's arrest

    http://www.kcra.com/article/da-dna-f...rrest/20078221
    I?m watching HLN rn. Billy Jensen, investigative journalist, basically confirmed that, but then he said that both Ancestry & 23 and Me have closed databases. So that?s a little confusing. Can a judge approve a warrant to search a closed DNA database? Whichever- it definitely sounds like cops got a familial match somehow.
    Programming Note:
    Set your DVR for HLN tonight if you want to see a rebroadcast of the entire series Unmasking A Killer tonight. It really good.
    Did I hear that he had a lawyer for a daughter & a doctor for a daughter too? Not sure if that matters, but still...
    Also, they?re saying that, SO FAR, they plan to charge him tomorrow for eight murders.
    Fun Fact:
    They just said (on HLN) that when the police came to arrest DeAngelo yesterday, he told them HE HAD A ROAST IN THE OVEN.
    Dafuq?
    The police told him not to worry about his roast, they?d take care of it.
    I?m trying to process the fact that this monster, this suburban American terrorist, this evil & perverted bastard, this burglar & rapist & murderer, told the cops he had a roast in the oven, as if he were a normal, kindly old grandpa. It?s just another example of the duality of people who do unspeakable things. It really blows my mind.

  5. #55
    Senior Member Jezebelle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhiskeyGirl View Post
    I came back to post this! Here's another article: http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/l...426-story.html
    Thx WhiskeyGirl! According to the article you posted, Ancestry, 23 and Me, and My Heritage deny that law enforcement reached out to them, but I don?t care how they got the familial DNA match just as long as it was done *legally* so that this bastard can?t weasel out of it. And I feel confident that they did so.
    It?s interesting to learn that they were able to narrow those matches to about 100 men, and then they ran down that list.

  6. #56
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Would it be possible for LE to synthesize DeAngelo's DNA that they had and submit it as a customer, to see what relative matches they received?

  7. #57
    senior cunt emmieslost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Would it be possible for LE to synthesize DeAngelo's DNA that they had and submit it as a customer, to see what relative matches they received?
    You actually have to send in a considerable amount of saliva to be analyzed. I had to submit mine twice because the first one did not contain enough DNA.

    This is pretty fucked, honestly. I know 23 and me has denied requests to LE for dna before. This could end up in court and set a precedent. I'm glad they caught him, but I fear what may come of all this.

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    Senior Member TupeloHoney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Would it be possible for LE to synthesize DeAngelo's DNA that they had and submit it as a customer, to see what relative matches they received?

    From what I gather, they wouldn't have to do that. They could submit an already-completed DNA profile for comparison without having to submit the actual genetic material. Some are speculating they used the same database the Doe Network uses ... GEDmatch or something like that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Not your business View Post
    I will out think the fucking pants off of you and you would thank me for helping you out of them.

  9. #59
    Senior Member Jezebelle's Avatar
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    The Golden State Killer took ?trophies? from his victims over the years, and he had lots & lots of victims, so his souvenir stash will be large... if he still has the stuff.
    He took things that we might expect- driver?s licenses, jewelry, etc., but here?s a strange twist:
    From one of his rape victims he took fourteen place settings of Noritake china, fourteen place settings of Reed & Barton silverware and a Reed & Barton butter dish! WHAAAT?! That?s weird, right? Isn?t that weird? Where the heck did he put all those things when he was leaving the scene of the crime? That?s a pretty big assortment. What the heck did he do with it? Did his family use it for their Thanksgiving dinners? Did he gift it to some newlyweds? I mean, the china & silverware are lovely, but STILL.
    I have soooo many questions.

    Here?s a link to an article (with photos) in case you want to check out the china, silverware & some of the other stuff he took:
    https://www.google.com/amp/people.co...w-evidence/amp

  10. #60
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TupeloHoney View Post
    From what I gather, they wouldn't have to do that. They could submit an already-completed DNA profile for comparison without having to submit the actual genetic material. Some are speculating they used the same database the Doe Network uses ... GEDmatch or something like that.
    From the link Nic posted above (see I read your posts Nic )

    Prosecutors said Thursday that they were led to DeAngelo through a match found on a genealogy website. The Sacramento County District Attorney's Office said that authorities used DNA collected from a crime scene of the East Area Rapist and compared it to online genetic profiles.

    "And so what we did using this DNA technology is it didn't give us a suspect," Jones said. "What it did is give us is kind of a universe."

    The DNA that was used to track him down was submitted by a relative of DeAngelo to a genealogical website, Chief Deputy District Attorney Steve Grippi said. Investigators then explored online family trees and followed clues to identify possible suspects.
    It definitely sound like they used the same kind of database that the DNA Doe Project is using. I didn't really understand until TH said, and I did some more reading, that this database is just profiles already done, that people have uploaded. I wonder how the people compiling it feel about this? I wonder if it will cause people not to want to upload now, or just the opposite?

  11. #61
    Cranjis McBasketball Nic B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    From the link Nic posted above (see I read your posts Nic )



    It definitely sound like they used the same kind of database that the DNA Doe Project is using. I didn't really understand until TH said, and I did some more reading, that this database is just profiles already done, that people have uploaded. I wonder how the people compiling it feel about this? I wonder if it will cause people not to want to upload now, or just the opposite?
    Aw, thanks for reading my posts! lol.

    I feel like because it is so soon after this happened, we may have to wait to know for sure all that happened. But I do think they used a DNA site of some sort that matched to a relative, then I guess went through that person's family history to see who could have been a likely suspect.


    Quote Originally Posted by marakisses View Post
    yes i said i will leave it under you storage he said cuddle with me i said shut up it over??? what am i doing wrong??

  12. #62
    Cranjis McBasketball Nic B's Avatar
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    SACRAMENTO, CALIF. (KCRA) —
    Joseph James DeAngelo is at the Sacramento County Jail. He was arrested Wednesday after investigators linked his DNA to crimes committed by the East Area Rapist, the Sacramento County District Attorney said.

    DeAngelo has declined interview requests, but neighbors who knew the 72-year-old for decades are sharing details of a man who now seems like an enigma.

    Bryan Wood was a neighbor to DeAngelo in the 1980s as a teenager, and again as an adult in the 1990s. He remembers DeAngelo moving into his Citrus Heights home around 1980 and being a father of three daughters and a husband to an attorney.

    The two bonded over remote-controlled model planes and boats. Wood, 50, now lives out of state.

    Wood talked to KCRA 3's Vicki Gonzalez about the man he knew as "Crazy Joe."

    Q: How much time did you spend at DeAngelo's home with RC planes and boats?

    Wood: I’d say, in the summer months, probably two or three times a week. That’s how we naturally met him and struck up a conversation and became friends -- albeit a little bit of a strange friendship because he’s a little different.

    Q: How so?

    Wood: Talking to him, you could tell he had a high degree of intellect. You’d see some of the stuff that he was capable of doing or pulling off -- like putting a machine into his model aircraft and boats and stuff -- and you’re like that’s pure genius. But yet, a normal conversation, he would just have peculiarities.

    Q: How do you remember him?

    Wood: His nickname was always "Crazy Joe" because he would have these outbursts.

    So, his nickname around the whole neighborhood was "Crazy Joe." He never gave any outward signs of having a devious past.

    In fact, we didn’t even know he was a cop. We knew that he was in the Navy.

    Q: As a family, what do you remember?

    Wood: He was usually home with the kids, most often during the day, and he would go to work at night.

    He never gave you any inkling, any kind of source, that he was mentally unstable or anything like that -- never at all. In fact, he was always a really, really good dad.

    Q: DeAngelo is now accused of being the East Area Rapist. How are you processing that?

    Wood: Oh for the love of God, you’ve got to be kidding me.

    We were in the car with that guy.

    My daughter has spent the night at his house. So, it’s still utter shock and disbelief.

    We knew he was a little different. We didn’t realize he was that damn crazy.
    http://www.kcra.com/article/crazy-jo...-case/20079357

    So he didn't tell his neighbor (who he hung out with a few times a week) that he was a cop. I am guessing because he would have to explain why he wasn't anymore or people would be able to find out themselves?


    Quote Originally Posted by marakisses View Post
    yes i said i will leave it under you storage he said cuddle with me i said shut up it over??? what am i doing wrong??

  13. #63
    Senior Member puzzld's Avatar
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    https://www.cnn.com/2018/04/26/us/go...rnd/index.html
    When police announced they had finally caught the Golden State Killer, Bruce Harrington had a simple message for the politicians who fought his tireless efforts to expand the California's criminal offender DNA database.

    "You were wrong," he said.

    Harrington, whose brother and sister-in-law were killed in 1980, spent years in front of public safety committees, pleading with them to embrace DNA technology.

    "And frankly I ran into a buzz saw of opposition."

    Many state elected officials and rights groups fiercely opposed any attempt by the state to expand its DNA collection database.
    Critics cited the privacy rights of people in police custody and questioned the constitutionality of allowing the state to gather DNA samples without evidence of guilt.


    Bruce Harrington, whose brother Keith Harrington and his wife, Patty, were victims of the Golden State Killer

    What the DNA database law does
    In 2004, California voters passed Proposition 69, known as the "DNA Fingerprint, Unsolved Crime and Innocence Protection Act."
    It gave the state broader powers to collect DNA. Now, it could get samples from anyone not just convicted of a felony, but even arrested for one.
    In some cases, authorities could also collect DNA from misdemeanor arrests.

    DNA's role in the capture
    This week, when officials arrested the man believed to be the Golden State Killer, they said the break came from a DNA sample.
    They didn't elaborate exactly how DNA helped them identify former policeman Joseph James DeAngelo as their suspect in a string of murders and rapes during the mid-1970s and 1980s.

    But outside the forensic lab where authorities announced the arrest, Harrington recounted his efforts to reporters.
    "I began my quest in the mid 90s when DNA finally came of force into the world of forensic science," he said.
    DeAngelo was charged this week with capital murder in the 1978 killing of Katie and Brian Maggiore. The 72-year-old man described by neighbors as a recluse is believed to have carried out 12 killings and at least 50 rapes in California, authorities said.
    Those crimes included the deaths of Harrington's brother Keith and sister-in-law Patrice, who were beaten to death in August 1980. Patrice Harrington was also sexually assaulted.

    "That case was a strong incentive to work on developing the California state database, which now has about 2 million profiles," Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas

    "All the time, we had this case in mind -- eventually hoping to solve this case."
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  14. #64
    Senior Member kevansvault's Avatar
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    I was watching Fox News as they broke the story (don't throttle me, I was at the car dealership getting my MILs car fixed, they had that shit on). Dude is in his 70s now, and DNA caught up to this motherfucker. All I can say is fuuucccckkk yes!

    And how's that got to feel, knowing your family member is the East Area Rapist? "You're dead to me." That's how.

    And Nic...hoollllyyyy shiittttt! You might have run across him over the years and never even realized it.
    Don't like what I have to say? I respect that. Now go fuck yourself.

  15. #65
    Cranjis McBasketball Nic B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevansvault View Post
    I was watching Fox News as they broke the story (don't throttle me, I was at the car dealership getting my MILs car fixed, they had that shit on). Dude is in his 70s now, and DNA caught up to this motherfucker. All I can say is fuuucccckkk yes!

    And how's that got to feel, knowing your family member is the East Area Rapist? "You're dead to me." That's how.

    And Nic...hoollllyyyy shiittttt! You might have run across him over the years and never even realized it.
    I know! We may have passed each other at the grocery store, for all I know. So creepy to think about!


    Quote Originally Posted by marakisses View Post
    yes i said i will leave it under you storage he said cuddle with me i said shut up it over??? what am i doing wrong??

  16. #66
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.cnn.com/2018/04/27/healt...acy/index.html

    What the Golden State Killer case means for your genetic privacy

    The arrest was made on the basis of genetic information, with detectives matching a discarded DNA sample from his home to evidence from the investigation, law enforcement officials said. DNA evidence is used to implicate criminals every day, but the method used in this case was new.

    The investigators used an open-source genetic database, GEDmatch, to explore family trees and see whether any contained matches to DNA samples from the crime scenes, according to Paul Holes, a retired cold case investigator who briefed the Sacramento County sheriff throughout the final stages of the investigation.

    Once a family profile was created, the investigators could find feasible "suspects" within a family.
    Anyone can use GEDMatch, a website for amateur and professional researchers and genealogists. The site's free tools allow people to enter their DNA profiles or genealogical data -- the information received from commercial genetic testing companies such as 23andMe or Ancestry.com -- so they can find familial matches with other users.

    Though the investigation for the Golden State Killer lasted decades, the DNA testing and matching took "only four months to get to the right pool of people," Holes told CNN. "With DeAngelo, there were over 100 distant relatives listed with some percentage of DNA match, so we looked at just how much DNA was shared. ... We only had to contact one or two people once we had all this information from GEDMatch."

    In short, the investigators tracked down DeAngelo based on genetic information provided not by him but by one of his relatives.

    "It is important that GEDmatch participants understand the possible uses of their DNA, including identification of relatives that have committed crimes or were victims of crimes," Curtis Rogers, co-founder of GEDmatch, said in a statement.

    In fact, the company's website states, "We take measures to ensure that only registered users have access to your results, but those measures have not been and never will be perfect. Direct access to your data is available to GEDmatch personnel, including volunteers, on a need to know basis."

  17. #67
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    I find this fascinating. Apparently the DNA site led them to the wrong person before they found DeAngelo.
    I highly recommend anyone thinking about using any DNA testing site to read the article I posted above this post.

    http://www.scpr.org/news/2018/04/27/...den-state-kil/

    Investigators hunting down the so-called Golden State Killer used information from genetic websites last year that led to the wrong man, court records obtained Friday by The Associated Press showed.

    An Oregon police officer working at the request of California investigators persuaded a judge to order a 73-year-old man in a nursing home to provide a DNA sample.

    It's not clear if officers collected the sample and ran further tests, but it was not the man arrested this week outside Sacramento in one of the state's most notorious string of serial rapes and killings. The Oregon City man was unable to answer questions Friday about the case.

    The case of mistaken identity was discovered as authorities hailed a novel use of DNA technology that led this week to the arrest of former police officer Joseph DeAngelo at his house outside Sacramento on murder charges. Critics of the investigative approach, however, warned it could jeopardize privacy rights.
    Investigators were able to make the arrest this week after matching crime-scene DNA with genetic material stored in an online database by a distant relative. They relied on a different website than they had in the Oregon search, and they did not seek a warrant for DeAngelo's DNA.
    Los Angeles County District Attorney Jackie Lacey said the use of GEDmatch to track down DeAngelo was "brilliant." She said upon hearing the news, "I was on fire. I thought, 'Well, let me go back to my office and find out, are we doing this also?'"

    It turns out her office has not yet used that tactic, she said. Lacey also predicted that "there’s going to be litigation," since people who hand over their DNA to a website in search of long-lost relatives probably don't expect police to use their genetic profiles, too.

    "There are probably people calling these companies right now saying, 'I want my DNA back,'" she said.

  18. #68
    Senior Member Jezebelle's Avatar
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    A bit more on the DNA matching. It?s kind of long, so I tried to highlight some of the DNA particulars.
    LE got a partial match from a ?distant cousin? of DeAngelo?s and traced a mutual ancestor back to his third great grandfather. They worked their way forward from there (and yeah, they honed in on the wrong guy last year!).
    It appears that DeAngelo threw away something with his DNA on it last week that they retrieved, so that should be totally legal.
    But the legality of uploading the DNA evidence from the crime scene to GEDmatch to find familial DNA- like some of you guys have said- is rife with privacy issues.
    I?m leaning toward the belief that the court will allow it because 1)- GEDmatch is straightforward about stating it?s an open-source platform where people voluntary upload their info and are informed that their DNA may be used for ?purposes beyond genealogical research? and 2)- IT?S THE GOLDEN STATE KILLER. At least 12 murders, 50+ rapes and well over 100 burglaries? FUCK. I think- and I HOPE- they won?t toss it out (and I?m generally a very liberal person).
    But I think we?ll see new regulations moving forward. And we?ll need them.

    WHAT DO YOU ALL THINK ABOUT THIS FAMILIAL DNA MATCHING?
    I?d love some input!

    The first step in finding Golden State Killer suspect: Finding his great-great-great-grandparents on genealogy site

    By RICHARD WINTON, TRACEY LIEN, PAIGE ST. JOHN and BENJAMIN ORESKES
    APR 27, 2018 | 5:10 PM
    SACRAMENTO

    There was no match in the FBI's national DNA database. A search of California's forensic data bank came up blank.
    The clue that led investigators this week to the door of the suspected Golden State Killer came instead from an unexpected source: an amateur genealogy website that's something like the Wikipedia of DNA.

    The arrest of Joseph James DeAngelo Jr., a 72-year-old former police officer suspected of a string of rapes and murders across California from 1976 to 1986, hinged on GEDmatch.com, an open-source platform where people volunteer their genetic information in hopes of finding long-lost family members.
    The breakthrough marks a novel investigative technique concocted by authorities desperate for leads in one of the nation's most notorious cold cases. Investigators were not sure what, if anything, they would find, but they eventually uncovered a new trail they traced back to DeAngelo's great-great-great-grandparents. From there, they spent months narrowing down his family tree to land upon him as the suspect.

    The tactic highlights the increasingly complex relationship between law enforcement, which covets genetic data; private sector companies, which have amassed heaps of it; and civilians, who volunteer their most personal information without always knowing how it will be used. And the approach is fraught with ethical questions.
    "It was basically a long shot on their part," said David Foran, director of the Forensic Science Program at Michigan State University.

    The largest genealogy services, 23andme and Ancestry.com, conduct DNA tests for paying customers but largely shield their findings from other parties.

    GEDmatch is a free service where consenting users upload test results from a variety of genealogy websites and cross-reference their findings to discover relatives who might have tested with different companies.
    "It's kind of intended to be unregulated so people on their own initiative can load their information," UC Berkeley law professor Andrea Roth said.

    Founded in 2011, the site is run by genealogical enthusiasts and is funded by donations and sales of more sophisticated search features. It has amassed around 950,000 user profiles ? a fraction of 23andme's more than 2 million customers and Ancestry.com's 10 million test-takers. But GEDmatch's data is not encrypted and is stored in plain text. Its privacy policy warns its information could be used for purposes beyond genealogical research.

    That made the site the perfect tool for investigators, who were able to search it without needing a warrant and parse genetic profiles of a new swath of individuals who haven't previously been arrested.

    Turning to GEDmatch was the idea of forensic criminologist Paul Holes, who spent years on the Golden State Killer investigation and recently retired from the Contra Costa County district attorney's office, and Stephen Kramer, an FBI lawyer.
    "We went on a roadshow to educate everyone about the idea," Holes told the Los Angeles Times.
    They won support from prosecutors but struggled to find a way to create a genetic profile for testing that wouldn't compromise too much of the remaining DNA evidence.
    That's when Steve Rhods, a Ventura County district attorney's office investigator, discovered a second rape kit in the coroner's office from the slaying of Lyman and Charlene Smith in Ventura in 1980.
    "It was the mother lode of DNA," Holes said, giving investigators enough material to pursue the genealogical approach.
    Holes said he uploaded the data and watched the magic happen. "We are talking third, fourth and fifth cousins and more distant than that, but it is a starting point," he said.

    The lineage search went back to "great-great-great-grandparents in the early 1800s to find the common relatives," he said. Since the start of the year, investigators have been tracing their way down the family tree to find a suspect.
    "Most of the people we were getting were from the East Coast or Midwest until we finally found the branch of a lineage that came out West," he said.
    Science turned to gumshoe investigating as law enforcement whittled down suspects. DeAngelo came to their attention around six weeks ago, Holes said, and wasn't the initial front-runner. But parts of his past lined up with the Golden State Killer's timeline.

    Investigators reached out to others in DeAngelo's life in the 1970s and 1980s. They had long suspected the killer had a law enforcement background. After talking to the police chief in the city of Auburn, where DeAngelo once worked as a police officer, they "began to think, 'Does this guy add up?' " Holes said. "I began to think ? is this finally our killer?"
    Investigators put DeAngelo under surveillance and surreptitiously obtained two DNA samples, which they matched with evidence from several of the killings. He was taken into custody Tuesday at his home in Citrus Heights near Sacramento.

    DeAngelo made his first court appearance Friday, wearing an orange jumpsuit as he was rolled into a downtown Sacramento courtroom handcuffed to a wheelchair. He appeared drowsy and expressionless throughout the brief hearing. Investigators believe he is responsible for at least a dozen homicides and 46 rapes.

    The move by law enforcement to tap a database not originally intended to help catch criminals opens a new front for detectives while simultaneously raising questions about privacy in the digital age.

    Melissa Deangelo, a GEDmatch.com user from Mississippi, said Friday that she was surprised by the company's disclosure that DNA housed on the site may have played a role in the suspect's arrest.
    "Is it an invasion of privacy? Yes," she said. "Was it worth the risk considering what he was doing? It was."
    (She does not believe the Deangelo family she married into is directly related to the accused California serial killer.)


    Former Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Steve Cooley believes the public safety benefit of mining DNA outweighs privacy concerns.
    "Law enforcement was creative and resourceful, and what they did was lawful and I commend them," Cooley said. "It doesn't mean there won't be issues raised, but at the end of day, you have to give a certain amount of weight to taking a serial murderer and rapist who has been unapprehended for four decades off the streets."

    It's easy to see why people would cheer the use of such tactics, said Roth, the Berkeley law professor. But "before we celebrate, we have to remember that the government probably looked at a lot of innocent people before getting here," she said.

    GEDmatch says it was not approached by law enforcement regarding the case, but it said users should be cognizant their data could be used by outside parties.
    "While the database was created for genealogical research, it is important that GEDmatch participants understand the possible uses of their DNA, including identification of relatives that have committed crimes or were victims of crimes," the company said in a statement. "If you are concerned about non-genealogical uses of your DNA, you should not upload your DNA to the database and/or you should remove your DNA that has already been uploaded."


    DNA doesn't simply identify an individual, warned Lee Tien, senior staff attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, it identifies whole families.

    "People say, 'I signed this consent form,' but he or she is not the only one. The privacy of everyone I'm related to is affected," Tien said.
    If investigators had no reasonable suspicion the Golden State Killer or his relatives were GEDmatch users, the tactic is the "definition of a fishing expedition," Tien said.

    Ruth Dickover, director of UC Davis' forensic science program, described law enforcement's approach to catching the Golden State Killer as a glimpse into a future in which virtually all genetic information is accessible to the government.
    "Unlike a Social Security number that can be forged," she said, "your DNA is your DNA, and it's with you from birth to even a little after death."
    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/l...outputType=amp

  19. #69
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Not at all her fault, but I can't imagine how this lady feels right now. I would also love to know why she broke off the engagement, and if she ever suspected him of being the Golden State Killer after what he told one of his victims?

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-revealed.html

    Ex-fiancee who broke suspected Golden State Killer's heart, and 'sparked his rape and murder' spree, is a travel blogger who went on to marry successful accountant and is now in hiding


    Ueltzel — then Bonnie Jean Colwell — was engaged to DeAngelo in the early 1970s but she broke it off and both went on to marry other people.

    But she clearly preyed on his mind. During at least one of his series of attacks, the killer lay down next to his victim after raping her and sobbed: ‘I hate you. I hate you. I hate you, Bonnie.’

  20. #70
    Senior Member Jezebelle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Not at all her fault, but I can't imagine how this lady feels right now. I would also love to know why she broke off the engagement, and if she ever suspected him of being the Golden State Killer after what he told one of his victims?

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-revealed.html

    Ex-fiancee who broke suspected Golden State Killer's heart, and 'sparked his rape and murder' spree, is a travel blogger who went on to marry successful accountant and is now in hiding
    Thx for posting this RBW!
    I also wonder what made her break it off. I assume she?s in hiding now to get away from the press & the gawkers? It seems like the Daily Mail can find almost anyone nonetheless. They even posted the names & ages of his three daughters, which I hadn?t seen before. It seems like SOMEONE would?ve known something was wrong with him, but who knows? Apparently everyone who knew him is in shock rn.

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0rELEZvseg

    Check this newscast from the 1980's during the time of the Deangelo murders there were other serial murders at play in the Sacramento area.

  22. #72
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jezebelle View Post
    It appears that DeAngelo threw away something with his DNA on it last week that they retrieved, so that should be totally legal.
    But the legality of uploading the DNA evidence from the crime scene to GEDmatch to find familial DNA- like some of you guys have said- is rife with privacy issues.
    I?m leaning toward the belief that the court will allow it because 1)- GEDmatch is straightforward about stating it?s an open-source platform where people voluntary upload their info and are informed that their DNA may be used for ?purposes beyond genealogical research? and 2)- IT?S THE GOLDEN STATE KILLER. At least 12 murders, 50+ rapes and well over 100 burglaries? FUCK. I think- and I HOPE- they won?t toss it out (and I?m generally a very liberal person).
    But I think we?ll see new regulations moving forward. And we?ll need them.

    WHAT DO YOU ALL THINK ABOUT THIS FAMILIAL DNA MATCHING?
    I?d love some input!
    This case is getting all the attention, but we actually have a few other cases even on MDS where familial DNA was used in one form or another to solve the crime. I think this one is the only one we have on here where a hobbyist database was used, but there are others where it was instrumental in solving the crime:

    Dennis Rader BTK http://mydeathspace.com/vb/showthrea...r-Dennis-Rader

    Allison Feldman http://mydeathspace.com/vb/showthrea...arrest-suspect

    The Grim Sleeper http://mydeathspace.com/vb/showthrea...rs-since-1985)

    Familial DNA showed two unrelated cases to be linked, which led to them both being solved in the Karlie Jade Pearce and her daughter case:http://mydeathspace.com/vb/showthrea...fferent-states

    I am sure there are others, but that's the cases that I remember off the top of my head.



    I have very mixed feelings about the whole thing, mainly because it's something that you don't have to to be the one to opt in, someone else in your family can do it for you by uploading their DNA. On the other hand, I am glad that this guy was caught, and I see a brilliant and fascinating future with what they can do with DNA. I would love to see some of these old cold cases solved, but then I also think about the wrongly accused that they have targeted due to familial DNA and I am concerned.

    I am the weirdo that won't even let them take my blood at work for the discount on my health insurance, even though I would pass and get cheaper insurance. I don't trust the guardians of this data. Even if they do the right thing at this moment, data is forever nowadays, and how do I know they won't merge or sell out in the future, and the new "owner" of my data won't sell it for nefarious purposes?
    I don't care if they say they can't/won't, there always seems to be some loophole. I could go from getting a $200 discount on my yearly health insurance because my cholesterol is good and I don't have diabetes, to having them actually run the blood for DNA, finding out I carry some horrible gene I don't know about, and then not being able to get health insurance or life insurance under Trump with his desire to wipe out pre-existing conditions protection. It's damned if you do, damned if you don't...I would like to know what I carry....or don't, but I am afraid to have it documented. A few years ago people would probably tell me I was paranoid and a conspiracy theorist about this, but who would have thought 10 years ago that we would voluntarily and freely give our data to a company who would use it to change our democracy, steal our identities, and who knows what else?

    So back to familial DNA...however you feel about it, I think the cat is out of the bag. I don't personally understand the need to research family lineage, and feel like it's an invasion of privacy to post all kinds of info on someone who is still alive, just because they are your cousin/sister/niece, etc, but it happens and probably every one of us have some kind of link on a genealogical chart somewhere on the internet. Add a profile on a DNA database website, and its just a matter of time before we're all linked and profiled even if we haven't done anything wrong. I kind of think of Minority Report and the whole pre-crime concept. Again, I am really 50-50 on the whole thing, even with my privacy concerns. I would like to see cold cases solved, and I am no friend of criminals, but I see a lot of gray areas.

    an interesting read:
    http://www.theadvocate.com/new_orlea...7c0d2f166.html
    New Orleans filmmaker cleared in cold-case murder; false positive highlights limitations of familial DNA searching

    More food for thought. Could this become just another tool used for racial profiling?
    https://psmag.com/environment/the-fl...matching-64736
    The Flaws of Familial DNA Matching-New research warns investigators of inaccurate results, and unfairness to minorities.
    According to researchers at the University of California-Berkeley and New York University, led by Rori Rohlfs, familial DNA searching will often indicate that two people are close relatives when they are in fact distant relatives. For instances, in an experiment that tested the process of familial DNA matching in the California DNA database (using simulated genetic profiles based on publicly available data), the researchers found that cousins could be misidentified as siblings.
    The study brings up another important consideration about familial searches: because the accuracy of the matching depends on the number and types of samples that already exist in the database, the accuracy of the matching will vary with ethnicity.

    For instance, it’s a fact that African Americans are disproportionately represented in the criminal justice system as well as in crime-fighting databases. In this experiment, "while the overall rate of false identification of unrelated individuals remains low," the rate of false positives of African Americans was "much higher, roughly two orders of magnitude higher" than other groups. (By comparison, there were relatively few Native American DNA samples in their sample group; the familial matching of Native American samples produced no false positives.)

    If African Americans suffer disproportionately from false-positive matches, and also from very-distant-relative matches, it follows that they will suffer disproportionately from intrusions of privacy and police interrogations:

  23. #73
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime...id=mailsignout

    Did man serve 39 years for slayings actually committed by ‘Golden State Killer’ suspect?

    In the early morning hours of Nov. 11, 1978, Rhonda Wicht, a 24-year-old waitress and cosmetology student, was beaten, raped and strangled with a macram? rope in her apartment in a quiet suburb near Los Angeles. Down the hallway, her 4-year-old son, Donald was smothered and suffocated to death in his bed, according to prosecutors.

    Hours after a relative discovered their lifeless bodies, a suspect was arrested in the case: Craig Coley, Wicht’s former boyfriend with whom she had recently broken up. Coley was charged with their killings. After a first trial resulted in a hung jury, Coley was convicted in a second trial of murder in 1980. He was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

    Subscribe to the Post Most newsletter: Today’s most popular stories on The Washington Post

    Coley remained behind bars for more than 38 years, always adamant that he was innocent. He petitioned for clemency, with no luck. A police detective with the city of Simi Valley begged his agency to reopen the case, noticing possible failures in the investigation. But authorities refused to give it a second look.

    That all changed on the eve of Thanksgiving last November, when Gov. Jerry Brown (D) pardoned Coley after police found new DNA evidence that no longer placed him at the crime scene. A Ventura County Superior Court judge erased his conviction. At the age of 70, Coley was released from prison, an innocent man.

    After nearly four decades, authorities reopened the investigation into the deaths of Wicht and her son. Now, Simi Valley police are looking into whether their murders might be tied to the man charged in one of the most notorious unsolved serial killings in U.S. history — the “Golden State Killer.”
    Simi Valley police want to examine DeAngelo’s genetic profile to find out whether his DNA is consistent with the evidence in the Wicht case, the Associated Press reported.

    Simi Valley Police Chief David Livingstone told a San Diego NBC affiliate that he noticed similarities between the crimes of the Golden State Killer and the Wichts’ murders.

  24. #74
    Senior Member Jezebelle's Avatar
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    Awww... poor dude hasn?t had any visitors? Cry me a fucking river. I would love to know what are the reactions of his daughters, ex-wife, grandkids & friends. I?m sure they?re horrified, but it?s hard for me to understand how no one had a clue that he was a sicko. Altho we hear it all the time- ?WE HAD NO IDEA!? I?d like to learn more about this phenomenon.

    And his ?confused & frail old man? demeanor is just an act, according to one of the investigators who worked on the case. I saw part of an interview with that investigator on HLN earlier today. Turns out that ?alleged? serial killer dude was under surveillance for several days prior to his arrest, and he was seen on his motorcycle zipping down the freeway at a high rate of speed (!). The $64,000 quote went something like this: ?DeAngelo has the agility (or was it vitality?) of a 50 year old.? LOL Not sure that that?s a ringing endorsement of his health, but I get it. He?s 72. And there are some very agile (and vital) 50+ year olds out there. I?m just not one of them!

    Inside 'Golden State Killer' suspect's life in jail
    By WHIT JOHNSON EMILY SHAPIRO
    Apr 30, 2018, 9:50 AM ET

    Joseph DeAngelo, the suspected serial rapist and killer known as the "Golden State Killer," was caught off guard when he was taken into custody at his California home on April 24, decades after his alleged crimes.

    DeAngelo, 72, was brought to Sacramento County Main Jail and is in a cell by himself due to the notoriety of case, a Sacramento County Sheriff's Department investigator told ABC News.

    No one has visited the former police officer so far, according to jail records.

    DeAngelo was placed on suicide watch as a precaution, the investigator said, and has also undergone a psychiatric evaluation.

    DeAngelo appeared in court Friday, handcuffed to a wheelchair, appearing dazed and with delayed speech.

    But retired investigator Paul Holes, who spent more than two decades searching for the killer and is still consulting on the case, claims it's an act, saying DeAngelo was seen riding his motorcycle at high speeds a week before the arrest. ?He is a dangerous man -- he is not the decrepit individual you see in a wheelchair at the arraignment," Holes told ABC News. "He is a spry 72-year-old who is physically capable. He has numerous guns registered to him."

    Holes also claimed that DeAngelo put up an effort to make his house blend into the neighborhood. ?I think that was part of his act," Holes said. "He wanted to blend into this neighborhood and not be perceived as this monster that possibly was living within this house."

    DeAngelo, who police say evaded investigators for decades, is believed by authorities to have committed 12 murders, at least 50 rapes and multiple home burglaries throughout California in the 1970s and 1980s. He was tracked down by DNA samples from distant family members.

    DeAngelo has not entered a plea. He returns to court May 14.
    http://abcnews.go.com/US/inside-gold...ry?id=54825172

  25. #75
    Senior Member Jezebelle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime...id=mailsignout

    Did man serve 39 years for slayings actually committed by ‘Golden State Killer’ suspect?
    Damn.
    A man did almost four decades in the infamous San Quentin Prison for crimes he didn’t commit?!
    I’ve thought about this a lot, and I honestly think it would be worse for someone to be given a life sentence in prison/the death penalty for crimes he or she didn’t commit, rather than for the real criminal to go free. And my family has been victimized (my sister was murdered in 1978), so you’d think I might not lean in that direction, but yeah.

    I was quite surprised to read that the police officer who worked to help this wrongly convicted man clear his name LOST HIS JOB at the police department back in 1991 because of those efforts. His supervisors told him to stop asking questions, to stop calling attention to possible errors that were made during the original investigation. To top that off, the ex-cop & his wife are letting the wrongly convicted man LIVE WITH THEM rn. Wow wow wow.

    I’m sure we will find out soon if DeAngelo was the real murderer in this case, but whaddaya wanna bet they find out that he has even more victims than the ones we know of? I’d be willing to bet on it.

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