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Thread: Andrew Finch (28) murdered by SWAT Team after online gaming feud leads to 'swatting' hoax

  1. #26
    So very tired raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://kotaku.com/man-arrested-for-...arg-1822036529

    Man Arrested For 'Swatting' Call That Led To Murder Charged With Involuntary Manslaughter

    Twenty-five-year-old Tyler Barriss was charged today in Kansas for involuntary manslaughter and two other counts in the wake of a swatting call that led police to kill an unarmed 28-year-old at his home. The maximum sentence varies but if found guilty, Barriss could face a hefty fine and years in prison.

    Barriss was also charged with giving false alarm and interference with law enforcement. His bond is set at $500,000.
    As Rolling Stone points out, Barriss is also being charged for a swatting incident in Calgary, Canada in late December. Nobody was hurt in that case.

  2. #27
    Senior Member Josephine's Avatar
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    His mother talking about him in the current tense is heart murdering.

    "[My son] doesn't play video games; he has better things to do."

    I just can't wrap my mind around how this is a "prank" or how a teenager, much less a 25 year old man, fails to see as potentially very, very dangerous. How could anyone in this culture in this day and age not realize that someone is more likely than not to be hurt or killed when you sent a swat team in on unsuspecting people? How many cases of night raids gone bad, kids shot accidentally by cops, unarmed people being killed does someone have to see before they think, "Oh, perhaps this could create a high-pressure situation where an innocent person could be shot out of carelessness, confusion, or any number of other factors in this pressurized environment."

  3. #28
    Moderator Jumaki15's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Josephine View Post
    His mother talking about him in the current tense is heart murdering.

    "[My son] doesn't play video games; he has better things to do."

    I just can't wrap my mind around how this is a "prank" or how a teenager, much less a 25 year old man, fails to see as potentially very, very dangerous. How could anyone in this culture in this day and age not realize that someone is more likely than not to be hurt or killed when you sent a swat team in on unsuspecting people? How many cases of night raids gone bad, kids shot accidentally by cops, unarmed people being killed does someone have to see before they think, "Oh, perhaps this could create a high-pressure situation where an innocent person could be shot out of carelessness, confusion, or any number of other factors in this pressurized environment."
    Alot of online gamers are fucking cancer. I mute my headset mic and turn down the volume on voice-chat all the way because of how annoying they are.

  4. #29
    Senior Member Josephine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blighted star View Post
    Technically you can't ring & just request them but if you describe a murder & an ongoing armed siege, there's a pretty good likelihood that's who's going to turn up.
    There isn't really an appropriate thread to post this in, but every time I see a post from you, it brings me such joy. I love the little stubbins in your signature so much!

  5. #30
    Senior Member Josephine's Avatar
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    I've been looking for updates on this one... the guy who sent the team, 25-year-old Tyler Barriss, has been charged with manslaughter. This article is pretty good, although it's more about failures in the Witchita police training system than this particular case. http://www.kansas.com/news/local/article194900084.html

    Lawyer James Thompson, who has sued the city in previous police shootings, said Wichita has far too many such incidents for its size and it’s a result of poor police training, staffing and funding that puts overworked and nervous officers on the street.

    “When they make mistakes, people die,” Thompson said. “That lays at your feet, so the blood of Andrew Finch is on your hands just as much as it is the shooting officer and the idiot from California who made the phone call.”

  6. #31
    So very tired raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.cnet.com/news/three-men-...watting-death/

    Three men indicted in Call of Duty-linked 'swatting' death

    Federal prosecutors have indicted three men in connection with a "swatting" death in Kansas.

    Andrew Finch, a 28-year-old man living in Wichita, Kansas, opened his door on Dec. 28, 2017, to police officers who believed he had a gun and was holding his family hostage. Officers shot and killed him based on false information from a call allegedly placed by Tyler Barriss, a 25-year-old in Los Angeles who had been accused of phoning bomb threats in the past.

    The Justice Department also announced charges against Barriss for allegedly making bomb threats to FBI headquarters and to the FCC during its net neutrality vote.

    Barriss is charged with manslaughter for the alleged "swatting" call -- when someone makes a false report to police and describes kidnapping, murder or other violent crimes, in the hopes of having a SWAT team dispatched. LAPD officers arrested Barriss last December.

    Court documents unsealed on Wednesday showed that two other suspects were involved with the call, which started from an argument over Call of Duty: World War II, with one player in Kansas and the other in Ohio. Finch was not involved with any of the suspects.

    According to direct messages that federal prosecutors obtained, the Kansas resident dared Barriss to swat him, giving an address for him to call the police to. But Gaskill didn't give his actual address -- it was a home in Wichita that his parents owned and rented out to Finch's family, according to the direct messages.

    "We don't live there anymore bahahaha," Gaskill wrote to Barriss, according to prosecutors.

    Shortly after reports came out that police had shot and killed Finch, Gaskill allegedly messaged Barriss again, urging them to "delete everything," telling him, "this is a murder case now."
    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...-won-t-n865626

    Wichita officer who killed Andrew Finch in 'swatting' mistake won't be charged

    The Kansas police officer who shot and killed an unarmed Wichita man at the door of his home after a hoax emergency call won't face any charges, prosecutors said Thursday.

    Bennett said that the officer's decision was "made in the context of the false call" and that to charge him "would require evidence, not 20/20 hindsight."

    The officer, a seven-year veteran of the department, hasn't been publicly identified.

  7. #32
    Senior Member blighted star's Avatar
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    Somehow I completely missed this shit. This had to be someone trying to make him look like even more of a raging fuckwit, right? He couldn't really be this stupid? Could he?



    https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/...ets-from-jail/


    "Your ass is about to get swatted," swatting suspect tweets from jail

    A software glitch in a Kansas jail temporarily gave the suspect Internet access.
    TIMOTHY B. LEE - 4/11/2018, 2:27 AM



    Swatting suspect Tyler Barriss depicted in a 2015 mug shot released by Glendale police.
    Glendale Police Department

    Tyler Barriss stands accused of making a fake emergency call, a crime known as "swatting," that led to the death of a Kansas man. He has been held in a Sedgewick County Jail since January. He is not supposed to have Internet access there, but on Friday the Wichita Eagle noticed Barriss tweeting.

    "How am I on the Internet if I'm in jail?" Barriss wrote. "Oh, because I'm an eGod, that's how."

    "All right, now who was talking shit?" he added in a tweet 19 minutes later. "Your ass is about to get swatted."

    The tragic incident that landed Barriss in jail occurred last December. Two Call of Duty players got into a heated argument, and one of them recruited Barriss, an Internet troll with a history of making malicious prank phone calls, to "swat" the other player. Barriss called Wichita authorities pretending to be a deranged gunman holding his family hostage in an effort to have a swat team raid the target's home.

    But the target lied to Barriss about his home address. So police surrounded the home of Andrew Finch, a 28-year-old man who had no connection to the online dispute. Finch opened the door with his hands up, but an officer shot him after-according to police-he appeared to reach for his waistband. Finch was unarmed.

    Barriss, who lived in the Los Angeles area, was arrested and extradited to Kansas. According to the Wichita Eagle, he has been charged with involuntary manslaughter, giving false alarm, and interfering with law enforcement.

    The Sedgwick County Sheriff's Office told the Wichita Eagle on Monday that Barriss had taken advantage of a flawed software update on the jail's Internet kiosks. These kiosks are supposed to allow prisoners to perform a limited set of functions, like purchasing items from the prison commissary or sending or receiving electronic messages. But they aren't supposed to allow general Internet access.

    But a software patch applied last week temporarily allowed users to visit unauthorized websites. Barriss used this brief window of unfettered Internet access to post to Twitter. We can be sure that prosecutors are making copies of these tweets for use during the sentencing phase of the case.

    "Y'all should see how much swag I got in here," Barriss wrote in another tweet before his Internet access was cut off.
    Last edited by blighted star; 08-28-2018 at 12:11 AM.

  8. #33
    So very tired raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime...019?li=BBnbfcL

    A California man was sentenced Friday to 20 years in prison for making bogus emergency calls to authorities across the U.S., including one that led police to fatally shoot a Kansas man following a dispute between two online players over $1.50 bet in the Call of Duty: WWII video game.

    U.S. District Judge Eric Melgren sentenced Tyler R. Barriss, 26, under a deal in which he pleaded guilty in November to a total of 51 federal charges related to fake calls and threats. The plea agreement called for a sentence of at least 20 years — well over the 10 years recommended under sentencing guidelines. Prosecutors believe it is the longest prison sentence ever imposed for the practice of "swatting," a form of retaliation in which someone reports a false emergency to get authorities, particularly a SWAT team, to descend on an address.

    Melgren said the case went into "uncharted legal territory," that the law has not caught up with technology and the charges didn't address the severity of what happened.
    Outside the courthouse, his sister, Dominica Finch, said Barriss got what he deserved, but that she also wants to see police held accountable. Finch's family has sued the city of Wichita and the officers involved. Police have said the officer who shot Finch thought he was reaching for a gun because he moved a hand toward his waistband. Prosecutors declined to charge the officer.

    Sedgwick County District Attorney Marc Bennett defended that decision.

    "I am very much sympathetic to the Finch family, but at the end of the day my determination has to be in what the law allows," Bennett said.

    Barriss' prosecution in Wichita consolidated other federal cases that had been filed against him in California and the District of Columbia involving similar calls and threats. Bennett also said Friday that he would dismiss state charges, including involuntary manslaughter, because Barriss would be getting more prison time from the federal charges than he could get in state court.

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation recognized swatting as an emerging threat as early as 2008, noting it had become commonplace among gamers.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Good and there should be a registered Swatters offenders list for people like Tyler R. Barriss, 26

  10. #35
    So very tired raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...-case-n1054331

    An Ohio gamer upset about a $1.50 bet while playing Call of Duty: WWII online was sentenced Friday to 15 months in prison for recruiting a prankster to make a bogus emergency call that resulted in the fatal shooting of a Kansas man by police.

    Casey Viner, 19, of North College Hill, Ohio, also is restricted from gaming activity for two years, U.S. District Judge Eric Melgren said in announcing the sentence.

    Viner pleaded guilty in April to felony charges of conspiracy and obstruction of justice in the hope that he would not be sentenced to prison. Viner admitted trying to hide his involvement in the 2017 incident when he realized the antic had gotten someone killed.

    Prosecutors and defense lawyers in their plea agreement had recommended a sentence of two years of probation, with the added condition that Viner be confined for six months to his home unless attending school, work or church. They also jointly recommended the gaming restriction.

    The death of 28-year-old Andrew Finch in Wichita, Kansas, drew national attention to "swatting," a form of retaliation in which someone reports a false emergency to get authorities, particularly a SWAT team, to descend on an address.

    Authorities said Viner recruited Tyler R. Barriss to "swat" an opponent, 20-year-old Shane Gaskill, in Wichita. But the address they used was old, leading police to Finch, who was not involved in the dispute or video game.

    Gaskill, who had previously given his old Wichita address to Viner, was charged as a co-conspirator after knowingly giving Barriss the same former address and taunting him to "try something."

    Barriss, a 26-year-old Los Angeles man with an online reputation for "swatting," called police from Los Angeles on Dec. 28, 2017, to falsely report a shooting and kidnapping at that Wichita address. Finch was shot by police when he opened the door to see what was happening outside.

    The federal indictment alleged that a forensic examination of Viner's iPhone recovered his deleted outgoing messages to unknown persons, including one in which Viner allegedly wrote: "I was involved in someone's death."

    Finch's family has sued the city of Wichita and the officers involved. Police have said the officer who shot Finch thought he was reaching for a gun because he moved a hand toward his waistband. The local district attorney declined to charge the officer.

    Gaskill has struck a deal for deferred prosecution that could allow the charges against him to be dropped.

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