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Thread: Rob Stewart (37) was killed in a scuba-diving accident

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    Senior Member missbad's Avatar
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    Rob Stewart (37) was killed in a scuba-diving accident

    Sharkwater filmmaker Rob Stewart goes missing during Florida dive
    U.S. Coast Guard searching for Toronto man who vanished Tuesday night in the Florida Keys


    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toront...mpaign_id=A100


    Toronto filmmaker and conservationist Rob Stewart is missing after a Tuesday night dive off the coast of Florida.

    The U.S. Coast Guard is on the scene Wednesday morning to search for Stewart, who vanished while diving near Islamorada in the Florida Keys, a chain of islands between the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, located nearly 200 kilometres off the state's southern tip.

    Stewart, best known for his 2006 documentary Sharkwater ? an examination of global shark-hunting and its impact on the ocean ecosystem ? was active in underwater filming.

    Jeremy Weaver, senior chief of the U.S. Coast Guard, told CBC Toronto that additional teams are assembling to search for Stewart at sunrise. A helicopter from Miami, a boat and a team of divers are involved in the search.

    Weaver said Stewart was with three other divers when he went missing, but the three are safe.

    Not clear why Stewart disappeared

    "They were diving on a wreck off of Islamorada," Weaver said.

    Stewart "resurfaced at the end of the dive, and as the boat was turning around to pick him up, he went back under ? and was not seen again."

    It's not immediately clear what caused Stewart to go back underwater.

    Weaver said weather conditions were good at the time of the dive early last night.


    Stewart's films have won dozens of awards

    Sharkwater premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival and has since won more than 40 awards at film festivals around the world.

    Filmmaker Rob Stewart on his book Save the Humans
    His second film, Revolution, was the highest-grossing Canadian documentary in 2013 and won 19 awards from global film festivals.

    Stewart was born and raised in Toronto, and studied biology at Western University in London, Ont.



    http://mydeathspace.com/article/2017...iving_accident
    Last edited by Olivia; 02-12-2017 at 12:58 AM.


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  2. #2
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    That doesn't sound good. Usually when someone goes back under after completing a dive, it's bad news: heart attack, equipment malfunction that they can't overcome and stay at the surface.

    You don't go back down at the end of a dive, your body isn't ready for it again, especially if he was deep diving (a lot of the wreck diving down that way would be considered a deep dive), so if he was diving deep he would have had to have decompression stops and can't go in again for a pre-determined time, without bad consequences.

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    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Sorry to double post, but I just saw this and wanted to add it. This was a very deep wreck dive. He would have to decompress, even if using nitrox or something like that. He could NOT go back down again immediately without risking nitrogen buildup in the body, and death.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toront...sing-1.3961210

    It's not immediately clear what caused Stewart to go back under water, but his sister said it was a "particularly difficult" dive, going to a depth of nearly 70 metres.

    She said her brother may have lost consciousness after doing a third dive that day.

    "It's extremely rare that even experienced divers are qualified to do that kind of dive.

    "The other fellow who was on the same final dive appears to have lost consciousness when he surfaced, so it might have been too much diving in a certain window. It's hard to speculate."

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    Senior Member Bewitchingstorm's Avatar
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    A GoFundMe has been started to raise funds for the search efforts. Why it is seeking 2 million dollars is beyond me.

    https://www.gofundme.com/search-rescue-for-rob-stewart

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    Senior Member missbad's Avatar
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    Body found in underwater search for missing Canadian filmmaker

    http://www.ctvnews.ca/world/body-fou...mpaign_id=A100

    Divers have found a body off the coast of the Florida Keys in their search for a Canadian filmmaker who went missing while scuba diving earlier this week.

    Rob Stewart, a 37-year-old award-winning documentarian from Toronto, disappeared Tuesday night shortly after surfacing from a diving expedition off the coast of Islamorada, Fla.
    The U.S. Coast Guard announced the tragic discovery around 6 p.m. EST Friday. The body was found at a depth of about 67 metres by divers from the Key Largo volunteer fire department, the Coast Guard said in a tweeted update.

    Search continues for missing filmmaker as friends, family work to 'bring him home'
    Sister of missing Canadian filmmaker 'terrified but hopeful'
    The body?s identity has yet to be confirmed, but the Coast Guard said the team ?reportedly found Stewart.?
    The finding came shortly after the Coast Guard announced that it planned to call off the search for before dark.
    Capt. Jeffrey Janszen, commander of Coast Guard Sector Key West, said Friday afternoon that officials searched a 5,500-square-mile area of the ocean ? a stretch of water about the size of Connecticut -- with no sign of the missing diver.
    ?We have saturated the area. We are confident we have done everything we can,? Janszen said. ?My heart and prayers go out to the Stewart family.?
    Stewart, an environmental activist, is best known for his 2006 documentary ?Sharkwater,? which examines global shark hunting and its impact on the ocean ecosystem. The documentary debuted at the Toronto International Film Festival and has won more than 40 awards at festivals around the world.
    Since his disappearance, Stewart?s family and friends have launched a GoFundMe page asking for divers and other people to assist with the search.


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  6. #6
    Senior Member Angiebla's Avatar
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    I know he was experienced, but 3 dives in one day? That seems excessive.

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

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    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    I know he was experienced, but 3 dives in one day? That seems excessive.
    Three dives in a day as a concept isn't necessarily excessive. You have to take into account what they are breathing (O2, nitrox, tri-mix, etc), bottom time, and depth. Just based on his depth, I would say he probably shouldn't have done 3 dives in a day, but I would have to see the exact profile to say for sure...you have to calculate it (in today's dive environment you just put it into the computer and it does it for you. Old school you calculated by hand on paper.)

    Obviously something went very wrong on this dive. I am interested to see what they find in the autopsy, but my guess is a heart attack.

  8. #8
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Deeper than he had gone before, difficult re-breathing equipment, dive buddy passed out after getting into the boat...yeah, this dive was a recipe for disaster!

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/loca...130649199.html

    Stewart and a small group of divers were filming the next installment of his “Sharkwater” series. He and a colleague resurfaced about 5:15 p.m. and the other diver got onto their dive boat boat and passed out. When the boat crew went to retrieve Stewart, he was no longer in sight. According to an email from the conservation group Sea Shepherd, colleagues think Stewart passed out as well and floated off.

    Stewart was using rebreathing diving equipment instead of conventional compressed air scuba tanks, which his friend Tyler MacLeod said in a Wednesday interview with Entertainment Tonight Canada is “a very complicated system.”

    Rebreathers recirculate the diver’s air by passing it through a scrubbing pad, which takes out the carbon dioxide. The devices have advantages, especially when filming wildlife, particularly the lack of bubbles to scare off fish. But they also pose more risk to a diver’s safety than conventional scuba tanks.

    The Queen of Nassau is in 225 feet of water and MacLeod said that was a deeper dive than Stewart had done before.

    “They were going deeper than he’s gone before,” MacLeod said in the ET interview. “Because in his eyes, it’s been getting harder and harder to find sharks, to get sharks.”

  9. #9
    Senior Member Angiebla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Three dives in a day as a concept isn't necessarily excessive. You have to take into account what they are breathing (O2, nitrox, tri-mix, etc), bottom time, and depth. Just based on his depth, I would say he probably shouldn't have done 3 dives in a day, but I would have to see the exact profile to say for sure...you have to calculate it (in today's dive environment you just put it into the computer and it does it for you. Old school you calculated by hand on paper.)

    Obviously something went very wrong on this dive. I am interested to see what they find in the autopsy, but my guess is a heart attack.

    I've only been snorkeling, so I don't know a lot about scuba diving. I remember watching a show a long time ago that explained how your body adjusts to different depths of the ocean, and if you go too deep, too fast, your eardrums will rupture.

    Could he have died from not depressurizing before going back down? Is that what caused the other diver to lose consciousness?

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

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  10. #10
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    I've only been snorkeling, so I don't know a lot about scuba diving. I remember watching a show a long time ago that explained how your body adjusts to different depths of the ocean, and if you go too deep, too fast, your eardrums will rupture.

    Could he have died from not depressurizing before going back down? Is that what caused the other diver to lose consciousness?
    If he did go back down right after the dive, the problem would come about when he tried to come back up. He would have had to decompress for a LONG time in that situation, and there could be a very increased chance of getting the bends.

    I don't think, as a professional diver, he would have knowingly gone back down right away. It's super risky. I also think they would have spotted him if he had just passed out on the surface and floated away.

    I think he reached the surface and had a heart attack which caused him to go under and drown. Here is some info on heart attacks and diving. It's not like a huge risk, but it does happen. One of our dear friends had a guy he was diving with die of a heart attack after they surfaced. He was able to pull him in the boat and they did CPR, but wasn't able to save him.

    http://www.diversalertnetwork.org/he...cardiac-health

    Statistics show that about one-third of all diving fatalities are associated with an acute cardiac event. In a recent study of DAN members, the incidence of diving-related deaths overall was determined to be 16 per 100,000 divers per year, and diving-related deaths due to cardiac causes was nearly a third of that number — 5 per 100,000 divers per year. It is of particular note that the risk of cardiac-related death while diving is 10 times higher in divers over age 50 than in those younger than 50. Indeed, the study of DAN members showed a continuous increase in risk with increasing age. While some suspected cardiac events may be provoked by dive-specific activities or situations, other cardiac events may not be caused by a dive at all — inasmuch as sudden cardiac death also occurs while engaged in surface swimming or land-based sporting activities of various sorts and even while at rest or during sleep.

    Acute myocardial infarctions (commonly known as "heart attacks") that are brought on by exertion — such as while swimming against a current, in heavy waves or under conditions of excessive negative buoyancy — are likely involved in some dive-provoked fatalities. Heart attacks are caused by an insufficient blood supply to the muscles of the heart; diving-related heart attacks typically occur in middle-aged males with undiagnosed coronary artery disease.

    Diving (or just immersion) may also provoke acute arrhythmias, or disturbances of the heart's rhythm, that can likewise result in sudden death. Arrhythmias are more likely to cause death in older divers. As Dr. Carl Edmonds explains in his book Diving and Subaquatic Medicine, and DAN data confirms, "The victim often appeared calm just before his final collapse. Some were unusually tired or resting, having previously exerted themselves, or were being towed at the time — suggesting some degree of exhaustion. Some acted as if they did not feel well before their final collapse. Some complained of difficulty in breathing only a few seconds before the collapse, whereas others underwater signaled that they needed to buddy breathe but rejected the offered regulator. Explanations for the dyspnea include psychogenic hyperventilation, autonomic induced breathing stimulation and pulmonary edema — the latter being demonstrated at autopsy. In all cases there was an adequate air supply available, suggesting that their dyspnea was not related to equipment problems. Some victims lost consciousness without giving any signal to their buddy, whereas others requested help in a calm manner."

  11. #11
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    An interesting article about how they actually found his body.

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/loca...131632604.html

    How searchers found the body of a missing shark diver

    For every hour that passed since acclaimed underwater filmmaker Rob Stewart vanished in the deep ocean, chances of recovery became more remote.

    At 5:13 p.m. Friday — literally minutes after the U.S. Coast Guard reluctantly closed the formal search for the 37-year-old Stewart — members of the Key Largo Fire Department Dive Team radioed in: A camera on a remotely operated vehicle, known as an ROV, relayed an image of the missing diver in 219 feet of water off Alligator Reef off Islamorada.

    “The [underwater] visibility was terrible, just awful,” said Rob Bleser, a Key Largo dive operator who serves as the fire department’s dive-team captain. “I don’t think we would have found him without the ROV.”

    Two rebreather-equipped divers working with the Dive Team’s Special Response Unit hit the water and followed the ROV cable down, quickly finding and securing Stewart’s body. A safety diver using traditional scuba gear stayed at the 90-foot depth for support. Bleser was piloting the ROV.

    “We don’t normally go that deep,” Bleser said of the ocean depths at the Queen of Nassau shipwreck that Stewart and dive companion Peter Sotis were diving on, seeking to video sharks and sawfish known to visit the historic wreck.

    Seven dive-team members and support volunteers were aboard the Pisces, an Upper Keys boat rigged for advanced technical diving. That same boat had carried Stewart Jan. 31, when he disappeared after surfacing from his third dive that day to the Queen of Nassau.

    The Coast Guard launched an air-and-sea search but darkness fell before any sign of Stewart was seen. Boats from the Upper Keys headed out last Wednesday morning to put more eyes on the water.

    The Key Largo Fire Department Dive Team performed one dive to the shipwreck that morning but the divers were hampered by poor visibility and limited bottom time.

    “At that depth, even with rebreathers, the bottom time is 20 minutes because they have to make a 75-minute decompression stop coming up,” Bleser said. “That changes everything.”

    “Given that so little can be accomplished in that kind of profile,” he said, “logistically it makes more common sense to use the ROV.”

    The ROV was borrowed from the Reef Environmental Educational Foundation, a nonprofit science group based in Key Largo. That same equipment was used to locate a Key Largo sailboat that sank in deep water in August 2014, claiming the life a local man.

    Stewart was found about 100 yards from the shipwreck. Bleser said the deepwater divers who recovered Stewart prefer to remain anonymous.

    The search for the Sharkwater filmmaker, who was born and raised in Toronto, “was one of the longest and most arduous missions we’ve had,” Bleser said.

    “Given all the information we had, we believed we knew where to look,” he said. “It’s still like looking for a needle in a haystack, with the needle constantly getting smaller and the haystack getting bigger. But we like to look after our own.”

    Investigation continues into the cause of the fatal accident. Stewart was a highly accomplished diver but was new to using rebreather gear and going deeper than he ever had, news accounts say.

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    http://www.citynews.ca/2017/02/09/go...tewart-search/

    GoFundMe campaign relaunched to help recover costs for Rob Stewart search


    The massive search for Toronto filmmaker Rob Stewart cost more than what was raised by a GoFundMe campaign, so the team behind the fundraiser is reaching out again.

    The 37-year-old disappeared in the waters off the Florida Keys on Jan. 31. He had just returned to the surface after a dive about 70 metres down near Alligator Reef. His body was found on Feb. 3.

    The massive search included the U.S. Coast Guard and Navy, as well as countless volunteers. Friends and family of Stewart also helped in the search efforts by bringing in an additional 14 helicopters, planes and several boats.

    The costs exceeded the more than the $100,000 initially raised through the GoFundMe campaign, according to Stewart’s longtime friend Tyler MacLeod.

    In a video posted on Facebook, MacLeod said he now has to pay $38,000.

    “There [were] a lot of people [who] stepped up to help us and we’re trying to get everyone paid back, and pay back all the outfitters from the helicopters, planes and boats.”

    Since the relaunch of the online campaign, people have stepped with some large anonymous donations, including one for $7,500.

    Stewart’s body was found about 220 feet below the ocean after a three-day search off the coast of the Florida Keys, where he was filming the sequel to his award-winning documentary “Sharkwater.”

    His funeral is scheduled for Feb. 18 in Toronto.
    I love Outside Magazine. They always have the best articles for outdoors adventure type things.

    https://www.outsideonline.com/215462...ewart-obituary

    The rebreather Stewart was using looks like a suitcase with shoulder straps and an inflatable wing. It enabled him to go deeper and explore his maximum depth longer with less decompression time than other technical diving rigs. An experienced diver with hundreds if not thousands of dives in his logbook, Stewart was new to rebreathers. More than a month before setting sail to find the sawfish, on December 19, Stewart posted to Facebook: “looking for a rebreather dive ninja mid January in Florida for some 300ft dives…”

    By January he’d connected with an instructor named Peter Sotis who owns Add Helium, a dive shop in Ft. Lauderdale. According to a since-deleted Facebook post, Sotis said that he certified Stewart in a rebreather tri-mix course on January 27. Four days later, on January 31, the pair chartered a dive boat through a dive shop in Key Largo and, with the boat’s owner Dan Dawson, headed to the Queen of Nassau wreck, six nautical miles off the Florida Keys, in search of the sawfish.

    Conditions were ideal: a refreshing 10-to-12-knot breeze was blowing and the azure ocean rippled with a mellow swell of 1-to-3 feet. Donning dry suits, Sotis and Stewart dropped into blue water, descending to 230 feet. Stewart brought his camera with him as they finned down toward the 111-year-old Canadian steamship, its skeleton encrusted with coral. The purpose was to shoot footage for Stewart’s next project, a documentary called Sharkwater Extinction, the sequel to his 2007 award-winning film, Sharkwater, which received broad acclaim for revealing shark finning to a wide audience. It not only made him a celebrity in the marine and conservation community but inspired global efforts to ban shark-finning.

    Stewart and Sotis dove the wreck three times that day. They were the deepest dives of Stewart’s life. The two men surfaced for the final time just after 5 p.m. within sight of the dive boat’s crew members. Stewart gave the OK sign. Sotis, however, appeared shaky as he climbed aboard the boat. Moments later, he blacked out. The crew retrieved bottled oxygen to revive him. In the commotion, they turned their backs to the water, and when they again looked for Stewart in the water, he was gone. The crew radioed for help immediately. Within five minutes, a Navy helicopter was dispatched and Coast Guard cutter Sexton was diverted to the scene, along with a small boat crew and an HH-65 helicopter from Miami.
    Tech divers I spoke to during the search reiterated one question about the circumstances of Stewart’s disappearance: Why had Stewart and Sotis attempted three deco dives (meaning deep dives that carry a greater risk of decompression sickness) in one day? Most experienced rebreather divers would attempt two such dives at most.

    “When you use a rebreather, you have to start from scratch,” said Simon Liddiard, owner of Blue Marlin Dive in Indonesia and a rebreather instructor for 20 years, when asked about Stewart’s disappearance. “It doesn’t matter how many years you’ve been a diver. You have zero experience.” Liddiard explained that it’s easy for beginners to accidentally flood the breathing loop, which can drag a diver down. Mixing the gases is also potentially dangerous: if a diver were to accidentally breathe hypoxic gas at the surface, he could black out and sink.

  13. #13
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    I totally read the headline as "Rod Stewart was killed in a scuba diving accident".
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    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
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  14. #14
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toront...eral-1.3989854

    Hundreds attend funeral for Toronto filmmaker Rob Stewart

    Hundreds attended the Saturday funeral for Toronto filmmaker Rob Stewart, with many people wearing blue to honour the oceans that the late conservationist fought to protect.

    Stewart — best-known for his award-winning environmental documentary Sharkwater — went missing during a dive in the Florida Keys in late January, sparking a massive four-day search covering more than 14,000 square kilometres.

    His body was recovered on Feb. 3, and his family later said Stewart was found "peacefully in the ocean." He was 37-years-old.

    "Rob's community was all of us... he affected so many people all around the world," CBC radio host George Stroumboulopoulos said during the service at Bloor Street United Church in Toronto.

    Stewart's sister Alexandra gave the eulogy, and she said the outpouring of support around the world shows how far-reaching Stewart's work has been.

    She said she'll miss her brother's "sense of adventure" the most.

    An experienced diver active in underwater filming, Stewart had been in Florida filming a follow to Sharkwater, called Sharkwater: Extinction, at the time of his death.

    Stewart resurfaced at the end of a dive, but as the boat was preparing to pick him up, he went back under — and his family later said he may have lost consciousness.

    His death was met with shock and sadness by many members of the film and environmentalist communities.

    Stewart was "a kind and gentle soul who worked tirelessly for justice under the sea," tweeted actor Adrian Grenier on Feb. 3.

    Project AWARE, a global organization of divers working to protect the planet's oceans, called Stewart an inspiration to divers and non-divers alike "to be agents of positive change for the ocean."

    Stewart's films have won dozens of awards

    Sharkwater, Stewart's first film, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2006, examined global shark hunting and its impact on the ocean ecosystem.

    It went on to win more than 40 awards at film festivals around the world.

    Cineplex is honouring Stewart with screenings of the documentary at select theatres across Canada on Feb. 25.

    Free tickets will be available in exchange for a donation to WWF-Canada, with all funds going towards Stewart's conservation work.

    His second film, Revolution, explored how people are striving to avert environmental collapse.

    It was the highest-grossing Canadian documentary in 2013 and won 19 awards from global film festivals.

    Born and raised in Toronto, Stewart studied biology at Western University in London, Ont.

  15. #15
    Member zombiemoon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Babe 73 View Post
    I totally read the headline as "Rod Stewart was killed in a scuba diving accident".
    😂 me too! Ok good to know I wasn't alone on that :)

  16. #16
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    https://toronto.citynews.ca/2018/09/...y-his-parents/

    Seeing their late son, Toronto filmmaker and conservationist Rob Stewart, diving into the depths of the ocean on the big screen again has been a bittersweet experience for Sandy and Brian Stewart.

    On the one hand they’re elated that his new documentary, “Sharkwater Extinction,” is coming to fruition after his death in January 2017 during shooting for the film off the Florida Keys.

    But as the expose against the illegal shark-fin industry gets set to make its premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival on Friday, they also find it hard to watch.

    “Because he talks through the whole film, it’s like he’s back,” Sandy Stewart said in a recent interview.

    “Particularly hard is the ending, because it’s the end of his story. I think it’s the start of another adventure for other people, but no one was like Rob. He was pretty unique in his film style, his philosophy on the world, ‘Be a champion,’ and I think the world has lost one.”

    The film is a followup to Stewart’s first 2006 documentary, “Sharkwater,” which was also at the festival.

    Stewart returned to TIFF in 2012 with “Revolution,” where his parents cheered him on from the sidelines. This year they’re front and centre to represent him and promote the film, which came together thanks to help from his friends and colleagues.

    “Shortly after the accident, we went through all of the footage, brought additional people onto the team,” said Sandy Stewart.

    “But his entire team stayed with it, everybody stepped up. We have people from all over the world — cinematographers, filmmakers, really important people — offering to help finish this, and that was really heartwarming.”

    Shot around the world in 6K, “Sharkwater Extinction” looks into political corruption and the pirate fishing trade surrounding illegal “shark finning,” a practice that involves removing a shark’s fin and discarding the animal at sea, which the filmmaker says is leading to the extinction of sharks.

    Stewart’s extensive film notes, diagrams and sketches helped the team deliver a project that has his trademark action-adventure style and his overall message that everybody can help save the environment, say his parents.

    “What I think we’ve managed to do is pull together people that have basically carried on his mission and are delivering a film by Rob, which is extraordinary in light of this situation,” said Brian Stewart.

  17. #17
    Don't drink sanitizer! raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Sharkwater Extinction is available to view on Amazon Prime. I've been wanting to see this!

    https://www.amazon.com/Sharkwater-Ex.../dp/B07QMTWJWD

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    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Sharkwater Extinction is available to view on Amazon Prime. I've been wanting to see this!

    https://www.amazon.com/Sharkwater-Ex.../dp/B07QMTWJWD
    Dammit! Of course that's the one service I don't have. Maybe I'll stream it through VUDU when it becomes available. I need to see how Rod Stewart died.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

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