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Thread: Space and astronomy

  1. #51
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S281Saleen160 View Post
    Seeing space like that got me, I want to buy a telescope. I never thought stargazing would be fun.
    I actually recently bought a telescope but I haven't had a chance to use it. I will report back after I have used it. You can also do astrophotography with it, which sounds interesting.

    https://www.celestron.com/products/n...ized-telescope

  2. #52
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    The Delta IV Heavy launch didn't go on Wednesday, it has been reschedule for tonight at 2:04am. Should be a nice display for the Florida peeps!

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/techn...id=mailsignout

  3. #53
    Senior Member KimTisha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    I actually recently bought a telescope but I haven't had a chance to use it. I will report back after I have used it. You can also do astrophotography with it, which sounds interesting.

    https://www.celestron.com/products/n...ized-telescope


    Not gonna lie, I'm a little jealous that your telescope looks bigger than mine.


    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    The Delta IV Heavy launch didn't go on Wednesday, it has been reschedule for tonight at 2:04am. Should be a nice display for the Florida peeps!


    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/techn...id=mailsignout
    Thanks for the heads up, I've set an alarm. I know I'll be awake, I'll just fall down a rabbit hole and miss it.
    You are talking to a woman who has laughed in the face of death, sneered at doom and chuckled at catastrophe.
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  4. #54
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimTisha View Post


    Not gonna lie, I'm a little jealous that your telescope looks bigger than mine.
    I got it over Black Friday on a super uber sale...that's the only reason I got a big one. And don't ask why I have had it 9 months and haven't used it...it's been a crazy year.

  5. #55
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    The Delta IV Heavy launch didn't go on Wednesday, it has been reschedule for tonight at 2:04am. Should be a nice display for the Florida peeps!

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/techn...id=mailsignout
    Boo, I stayed up and now it's on hold due to 'technical issues'.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    I actually recently bought a telescope but I haven't had a chance to use it. I will report back after I have used it. You can also do astrophotography with it, which sounds interesting.

    https://www.celestron.com/products/n...ized-telescope
    Yo thats nice! I want one.

  7. #57
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S281Saleen160 View Post
    Yo thats nice! I want one.
    Wait for Black Friday. I got it for about half price last BF.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Wait for Black Friday. I got it for about half price last BF.
    How long before they say black friday is racist?

  9. #59
    Junior Member DemiLovatto's Avatar
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    Jupiter (and comparison of angular sizes with Mars and Saturn)
    Celestron NexStar 8 SE telescope
    Barlow GSO 2x lens, 1.25 "
    Atmospheric dispersion corrector ZWO NEW ADC 1.25 "
    Canon EOS 800D camera

  10. #60
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DemiLovatto View Post


    Jupiter (and comparison of angular sizes with Mars and Saturn)
    Celestron NexStar 8 SE telescope
    Barlow GSO 2x lens, 1.25 "
    Atmospheric dispersion corrector ZWO NEW ADC 1.25 "
    Canon EOS 800D camera
    Very nice! This is the telescope and lens I have, I haven't tried astrophotography yet, but hope to soon. Would love to see any other pics you have! Welcome to MDS!

  11. #61
    Senior Member Bewitchingstorm's Avatar
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    Wow, Demi, that is amazing!

  12. #62
    Senior Member KimTisha's Avatar
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    Watched the Space Station fly over last night from a cornfield in Iowa. Very nice.
    You are talking to a woman who has laughed in the face of death, sneered at doom and chuckled at catastrophe.
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  13. #63
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.travelandleisure.com/tri...id=41851662176

    The Orionid Meteor Shower Will Light Up the Sky With Shooting Stars This October — Here's How to See It

    If your idea of a perfect fall night includes stargazing, you’re in luck. The Orionid meteor shower puts on a spectacular display each October. At its peak, which typically occurs between Oct. 20 and 24, the shower produces around 15 shooting stars per hour, though up to 70 per hour have been recorded during particularly robust years. While some meteor showers are more prolific — August’s Perseids event, for instance, regularly dazzles with about 60 shooting stars per hour — the Orionids’ shooting stars have a special quality. Though they’re incredibly fast, zipping through the atmosphere at 41 miles per second, they often leave behind a trail that lingers in the sky for a few seconds or even up to a minute.
    The meteor shower usually occurs from Oct. 2 through Nov. 7, with a peak between Oct. 20 and 24. In 2020, the peak will occur after midnight on Oct. 21, though you’ll still see plenty of meteors the evening before and after. And this year, viewers are in luck — the moon will be in its waxing crescent phase during the peak, which means moonlight won’t drown out the meteors. On top of that, the moon will actually set in the evening, so the skies will be as dark as possible for ideal viewing.
    For starters, you’ll want to position yourself as far away from light pollution as possible. Sit outside for at least 20 minutes so that your eyes can adjust, then look up at the sky toward the Betelgeuse star in the Orion constellation. (In the Northern Hemisphere, it’ll be in the southeastern sky, and in the Southern Hemisphere, it’ll be in the northeastern sky.) The best time to see the meteors will be just before dawn, but any time between midnight and dawn will do. And if you can’t find Orion, don’t worry — you can usually see meteors all across the sky.

  14. #64
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.travelandleisure.com/tri...id=42955677951

    That Asteroid Heading Into Earth’s Orbit May Actually Be an Old Rocket From 1966


    What was thought to be an asteroid heading into Earth’s orbit next month might be complete garbage. A NASA expert says the object is likely an old rocket from a moon landing attempt back in 1966, according to the Associated Press.

    Last month, an object known as asteroid 2020 SO was spotted from a telescope in Maui. It was expected to enter the Earth’s orbit this autumn and continue orbiting until about May 2021, in what is known as a mini moon, according to Smithsonian Magazine. CNN reported that it could come as close as 27,000 miles away.

    But from the start, another theory was also out there. “I suspect this newly discovered object 2020 SO to be an old rocket booster because it is following an orbit about the Sun that is extremely similar to Earth's, nearly circular, in the same plane, and only slightly farther away [from] the Sun at its farthest point,” Dr. Paul Chodas, director of NASA's Center for Near Earth Object Studies, told CNN last month.




    Now that it’s getting closer, it will start becoming easier to identify the mass, estimated to be about 26 feet, the AP reports. While both asteroids and old space rockets would appear to be specks moving in the sky, Chodas told the news service that the behavior continues to point toward the hypothesis of it being essentially an oversized tin can. Asteroids, he said, would move by at odd angles, while this one has been remaining in the Earth’s plane.

    He also has a theory as to the actual rocket it might be. “I could be wrong on this. I don’t want to appear overly confident,” Chodas told the AP, speculating that it could be the upper rocket stage that boosted NASA’s Surveyor 2 to the moon in 1966. While the launch ended up crashing into the moon because of a failed thruster, it would make sense that the rocket just kept floating by, as it was intended. “It’s the first time, in my view, that all the pieces fit together with an actual known launch,” he added.

    While mistaking asteroids for other objects — and vice versa — is common, other experts seem to agree with Chodas’ theory. Alice Gorman of Australia’s Flinders University told ScienceAlert that the speed also doesn’t line up with an asteroid: “The velocity seems to be a big one. What I'm seeing is that it's just moving too slowly, which reflects its initial velocity. That's essentially a big giveaway.”

  15. #65
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.accuweather.com/en/space...y-night/848720

    Shooting stars to streak across sky this week amid famous meteor shower

    November’s top astronomy event is about to put on a dazzling display in the night sky -- one of the most famous meteor showers in recent astronomical history.

    The annual Leonids came to fame back in the 1800s due to impressive outbursts of shooting stars, but this year’s showing will be more tame as it reaches its peak on Monday night into the early hours of Tuesday morning.

    “This year will be a typical year for the Leonids, which means about 15 meteors per hour,” AccuWeather Astronomy Blogger Dave Samuhel said. Like most meteor showers, it will be best seen during the latter part of the night leading up to daybreak.

    Stargazers that spend Monday night under the heavens could spot a few extra shooting stars due to the waning Northern Taurids, a minor meteor shower that has a plateaulike peak around the second week of November.

    This year will be a good year for viewing the Leonids as it peaks on a moonless night. Because of that, onlookers will be able to see the fainter shooting stars that would normally be washed out by the light of a glowing moon. However, folks will want to keep a close eye on the cloud forecast before heading outside.

    Clouds will be of greatest concern for prospective stargazers across much of the northern tier of the contiguous United States and into Canada. The exception to this will be across parts of the western Great Lakes into the eastern Canadian Prairies where there may be enough breaks in the clouds to spot some shooting stars.

    The rest of North America will have mainly cloud-free conditions for the peak of the Leonids, including some of the darkest national parks in the U.S. Averaging 15 meteors per hour, the Leonids may sound like a run-of-the-mill meteor shower, but a few times a century, it erupts into a spectacular light show unlike any other.

    “This meteor shower has produced the greatest known meteor storms in history,” Samuhel said. Accounts from people that have witnessed these incredible meteor storms sound more like a scene from a Hollywood movie rather than reality.

    “In 1966, rates topped 100,000 per hour with up to 40 occurring per second,” Samuhel said.
    Stargazers might want to keep their telescopes handy after next week's celestial show. Just about a month after the Leonids, one of the best meteor showers of the entire year will occur.

    The Geminids will reach its climax on the night of Sunday, Dec. 13, into the early hours of Monday, Dec. 14, boasting 120 to 150 meteors per hour. This is roughly two or three shooting stars every minute.

    Like the Leonids, this year will be a good year for the Geminids as its peaking will occur around the same time as a new moon. So, stargazers may want to mark the Geminids on calendars now and plan ahead for an entertaining night under the stars.

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  17. #67
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/pom...tay-long-term/



    A Southern California native made history this week as the first Black astronaut to work at the International Space Station as a long-term crew member.

    Victor Glover, who was born in Pomona and graduated from Ontario High School in 1994, arrived at the NASA outpost on Tuesday as part of SpaceX’s second crew launch. The 44-year-old Navy commander and pilot is the only space rookie of the four-member crew, who’s staying at the station for six months.

    For NASA, the mission begins regular crew rotations at the space station with the help of a private company’s spacecraft.

    Glover was chosen as an astronaut in 2013 while he served as a legislative fellow at the U.S. Senate.

    Asked about his career trajectory in an interview released by NASA, Glover noted his experience at Ontario High School.

    “It goes way back,” he said. “So high school athlete, love being part of a small high-performing team, wrestling and football. [I] was fortunate to wrestle in college while pursuing my engineering education.”

    He graduated from the California Polytechnic Statue University, San Lus Obispo in 1999 before earning three master’s degrees between 2007 and 2010 at the Edwards Air Force Base in California, the Naval Postgraduate School and the Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama.

    Glover said he originally wanted to be a Navy SEAL.

    “I wind up deciding to go into aviation and learn to fly,” he said.

    Black astronauts have made short stays at the space station before, according to The New York Times, but Glover is the first one to join a crew for an extended stay.

    “It is bittersweet because I’ve had some amazing colleagues before me that really could have done it, and there are some amazing folks that will go behind me,” he said of the milestone in a recent interview with The Christian Chronicle. “I wish it would have already been done, but I try not to draw too much attention to it.”

    Over the summer, as Americans protested on the streets following the killing of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, Glover spoke about racial injustice on Twitter.

    In response to a question about astronauts sticking to space, he explained: “Remember who is doing space. People are. As we address extreme weather and pandemic disease, we will understand and overcome racism and bigotry so we can safely and together do space. Thanks for asking.”

    Glover has four children with his wife, Dionna Odom of Berkeley, according to NASA. His mother still lives in Southern California, and his father and stepmother reside in Prosper, Texas.
    Congrats to Victor Glover!

  18. #68
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    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...out&li=BBnb7Kz

    Puerto Rico's famed Arecibo telescope collapses

    The renowned Arecibo Observatory telescope in Puerto Rico collapsed on Tuesday, officials said, weeks after an announcement that the vast structure would be dismantled due to its decrepit and dangerous condition.

    Two cables holding the instruments platform above the 1,000 feet (300 meter) diameter radio dish had snapped in recent months, and engineers had warned that it was on the brink of collapse.

    "We can confirm the platform fell and that we have reports of no injuries. We will release additional details as they are confirmed," Rob Margetta, spokesman for the National Science Foundation, told AFP.

    The telescope was one of the largest in the world and has been a tool for many astronomical discoveries, as well as being famous for its dramatic scale and setting.

    An action scene from the James Bond film "GoldenEye" took place above the telescope, and in the film "Contact" an astronomer played by Jodie Foster used the observatory in her quest for alien signals.

    Abel Mendez, director of the Planetary Habitability Laboratory at the University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo, said the platform collapsed shortly before 8:00am (1200 GMT).

    He described it as "a total disaster."

    The telescope was in operation until August this year.

  19. #69
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    I actually recently bought a telescope but I haven't had a chance to use it. I will report back after I have used it. You can also do astrophotography with it, which sounds interesting.

    https://www.celestron.com/products/n...ized-telescope
    I finally started using my telescope this fall. It's pretty awesome, but I'm still learning about how it works.

    Also, looking forward to the meteor shower this week:

    https://earthsky.org/astronomy-essen...-meteor-shower

    The Geminid meteor shower – always a highlight of the meteor year – is expected to peak in 2020 on the night of December 13-14 (Sunday evening until dawn Monday). You might see a decent spattering of meteors on the preceding nights (December 11-12 and December 12-13) as well. And you might catch a Geminid meteor anytime this week, as the shower builds to its peak. The Geminids are a very reliable shower if you watch at the best time of night, centered on about 2 a.m. for all parts of the globe, and if you watch in a dark sky. The meteors tend to be bold, white and quick. This shower favors Earth’s Northern Hemisphere, but it’s visible from the Southern Hemisphere, too. The curious rock comet called 3200 Phaethon is the parent body of this shower.

    On a dark night, near the peak, you can often catch 50 or more meteors per hour. On an optimum night for the Geminids, it’s possible to see 150 meteors per hour … which might happen this year, given the moon-free skies accompanying this year’s Geminid meteor shower. New moon falls on December 14, 2020. On the mornings before that date, you’ll see a waning crescent moon. And – on December 11, 12 and 13, 2020 – after a night of meteor-watching, the slender lunar crescent and dazzling planet Venus will rise into your eastern sky at or near dawn.

    Why are the Geminids best around 2 a.m.? It’s because that’s when the shower’s radiant point – the point in our sky from which the meteors seem to radiate – is highest in the sky. As a general rule, the higher the constellation Gemini the Twins climbs into your sky, the more Geminid meteors you’re likely to see.

    This Geminids’ radiant point nearly coincides with the bright star Castor in Gemini. That’s a chance alignment, of course, as Castor lies about 52 light-years away while these meteors burn up in the upper atmosphere, some 60 miles (100 km) above Earth’s surface.

    Castor is noticeably near another bright star, the golden star Pollux of Gemini. It’s fun to spot them, but you don’t need to find a meteor shower’s radiant point to see these meteors.

    Instead, meteors in annual showers appear in all parts of the sky. It’s even possible to have your back to the constellation Gemini and see a Geminid meteor fly by.
    And then we have this to look forward to later this month:

    https://www.nbcnews.com/science/spac...n-800-n1250418

    'Christmas Star' will be closest visible conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in 800 years

    The Great Conjunction of 2020 will brighten the darkest day of the year as the two giant planets of our solar system draw closer together in the night sky than they have been in centuries.

    By chance, the day that Jupiter and Saturn will appear closest for Earth-based stargazers is Dec. 21, the winter solstice, which is the longest night of the year in the northern hemisphere.

    The double planet view is also known by some astronomers as the "Christmas Star" because of a belief that the biblical tale of the Star of Bethlehem could have been a planetary conjunction. Although around two thousand years ago, Venus and Jupiter were closest — not Jupiter and Saturn, as is the case for the "Christmas Star" of 2020.

    The last time the two planets were so close was 1623, but stargazing conditions at the time meant the astronomical event likely was not seen by earthlings. The last time such a close pairing was observable to the naked eye was in 1226, according to EarthSky.

    On the evenings of December 15 through 18, stargazers can easily find Jupiter and Saturn moving in conjunction by looking toward the waxing crescent moon in the western sky 45 minutes after sunset, according to NASA's Night Sky Network.

    "Keep in mind that while the two gas giants may appear close, in reality they are hundreds of millions of miles apart," NASA writes."This will still be quite a striking sight, but you will need to look fast as both planets will set shortly after sunset."

    On the solstice night, Dec. 21, the moon will be higher in the sky, but Jupiter and Saturn will remain closer to the horizon in the western sky and will appear as one large star. From an amateur telescope, however, a stargazer might be able to clearly see both planets and some of their moons within one frame of view.

  20. #70
    Senior Member KimTisha's Avatar
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    Thanks for this, I didn't know about the Conjunction.

    We were out watching the Space Station the other night, and I pointed out Saturn and Mars to my neighbors. It would have been great to have a telescope.
    You are talking to a woman who has laughed in the face of death, sneered at doom and chuckled at catastrophe.
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  21. #71
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    I stayed up till 1am after watching the Sunday night NFL game and finishing my book, and I stood outside looking up until my neck hurt, and I never saw a single meteor.

    To be fair though, as soon as we walked outside the night before I saw a really bright one shoot across the sky. Hubby will be here tonight, so I'm going to see if he will stay up late and we can try it again tonight.

  22. #72
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/rare-th...-january-2021/

    Rare three-planet conjunction of Mercury, Jupiter and Saturn to illuminate the sky this weekend

    Last month, Jupiter and Saturn treated skywatchers to a spectacular, once-in-a-lifetime "great conjunction," when they were closer in the night sky than they had been since medieval times. Now, as our solar system's two largest planets continue to drift apart, they will be joined by a third — Mercury — forming a rare three-planet conjunction.

    A triple conjunction is traditionally defined as two planets meeting each other three times in a short timeframe but NASA has also used the term to refer to three planets meeting. A planetary trio is defined by planets within a circle with a diameter less than 5 degrees in width — which can be visualized as three fingers held together at an arm's length, according to EarthSky.

    The last one occurred in October 2015.

    Jupiter and Saturn have been slowly drifting apart since their extremely rare meeting in December, but Mercury is just now coming into view, forming the planetary triangle.

    "From Friday evening to Monday evening, the planet Mercury will appear to pass first by Saturn and then by Jupiter as it shifts away from the horizon, visible each evening low in the west-southwest and setting before evening twilight ends," NASA said.

    Planetary trios are relatively rare, although nowhere near as special as the recent great conjunction. Mercury, Venus and Jupiter will meet in the sky on February 13.

    After that, another triple conjunction won't occur until April 2026, when Mercury, Mars and Saturn meet, according to EarthSky.

    How to watch

    The planetary trio can best be spotted at dusk, from Friday through Monday. All three will be visible low in the western sky, close to the sunset point on the horizon, EarthSky said.

    On Sunday, January 10, the three planets will be closest together, fitting inside a circle with a diameter of 2 1/2 degrees at 19:00 UTC.

    Clear conditions will be needed to spot the planets, but they will be visible together for several days. As always, it is important to find an area away from bright city lights for the best viewing conditions.

    Binoculars will come in handy for spotting the trio clearly, but they will also be visible to the naked eye. Another way to improve your experience is to view the event from a high vantage point, with a very clear view of the horizon line.

    Jupiter will be the brightest of the planets, followed by Mercury, then Saturn — making it the most difficult to spot. It's important to look for the planets in the 30 minutes after sunset — any later, and they will fall below the horizon line.

    Following their conjunction, mercury will continue climbing higher in the sky, while Jupiter and Saturn will sink, soon fading from view altogether. Mercury will reach its greatest elongation on January 24.

  23. #73
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    Fingers crossed that I finally get clear skies for the triple conjuncture. I missed out on most astrology events in November and December. I caught the ISS and spacelink a few times but that’s about it.

    RBW- nice telescope! I’ve been looking at some binoculars for night sky viewing but they’re so expensive.

  24. #74
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilbirdie View Post
    Fingers crossed that I finally get clear skies for the triple conjuncture. I missed out on most astrology events in November and December. I caught the ISS and spacelink a few times but that’s about it.

    RBW- nice telescope! I’ve been looking at some binoculars for night sky viewing but they’re so expensive.
    Thanks! I lucked out and caught it on a Black Friday sale in late 2019. Now, due to COVID and people wanting to do things at home, telescope (and related paraphernalia) have gone through the roof!

    I missed most of the the good events in November and December too. It's just been too cloudy. I did get to see the conjecture of Saturn and Jupiter a couple of days after the closest day. It was really cool!

  25. #75
    Senior Member KimTisha's Avatar
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    I have telescope envy.
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