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  1. #176
    So very tired raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    OMG people are stupid! Enjoy!

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/entertainm...gnout#image=24

    52 Biggest Pop Culture Conspiracy Theories

  2. #177
    Senior Member Bewitchingstorm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    OMG people are stupid! Enjoy!

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/entertainm...gnout#image=24

    52 Biggest Pop Culture Conspiracy Theories
    So Beyonce' didn't kidnap Sia...WTF?

  3. #178
    Senior Member Queena's Avatar
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    Jim Morrison wasn't murdered?!

  4. #179
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    Myles Power and the Alex Jones Frogs rants.

  5. #180
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  6. #181
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  7. #182
    Senior Member blighted star's Avatar
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    https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/811199...-rapper-alive/

    RAP RIDDLE Man claiming to be Tupac?s ex bodyguard ?found dead? days before he was due to release ?evidence? rapper is still alive
    Michael Nice sensationally claimed the star was smuggled into Cuba with the help of Castro

    By Jon Lockett
    3rd January 2019, 3:17 pm
    Updated: 3rd January 2019, 3:47 pm



    A MAN who claimed he was Tupac Shakur's former bodyguard has reportedly been found dead - after alleging he was about to reveal "proof" the rapper was still alive.

    Michael Nice hit the headlines when he sensationally said the star was smuggled into Cuba with the help of former President Fidel Castro following the hit which cops say claimed his life.




    The Brit said he was working for the activist group The Black Panthers when he was drafted in to help Tupac flee America.

    But now the YouTube channel the 56-year-old worked for has reported he died in the week before Christmas.

    Despite no official news reports confirming the death, Icini Studios posted a bizarre clip saying he had been found dead on December 18.

    They claim they spoke to his ?brother? - a man called Johnny - who labelled Nice's sudden death "suspicious".



    Michael Nice had said he helped smuggle Tupac out of the US when he was shotYOUTUBE


    ?Unfortunately, a great man passed away,? he said.?He was found slumped at his wheel and was pronounced dead at the scene.

    "Reports came back saying natural causes but earlier that night, he told me he was going to a meeting and he wasn?t too happy about it."

    He then strangely adds: ?I suspect he was having a meeting with MI5 agents and Michael Nice was poisoned?.



    It's claimed Nice died in the run up to ChristmasICINI STUDIOS


    The website he worked for revealed news of his apparent death


    The apparent death comes after Nice claimed he had been in touch with a Tupac "body double? who had testified the star was living in hiding.

    However not all those to have seen the oddball video are convinced by its claims.

    ?This is so fake, just like the news he talks about,? one wrote.

    The rapper was infamously shot on the Las Vegas strip back in 1996 as he was leaving a Mike Tyson fight, aged just 25.




    This pic is said to show Suge Knight with Tupac in Cuba

    This pic is said to show Suge Knight with Tupac in Cuba


    Since then, conspiracy theories that he actually survived the shooting and faked his death have continued to spread.

    Nice had claimed: "I have audio and video evidence of Fidel Castro confirming he sanctioned Tupac to live in Cuba. And he sanctioned the double body switch that I was involved in.

    "There were terms and conditions on that sanction. There was a limit to the amount of time. There were conditions on his behaviour. He must not confess to actually be in Cuba."



    Michael previously told TMZ: "Why you think nobody been arrested if they said they the one that killed Tupac?"

    Numerous people - including fellow rapper Notorious BIG - have over time been implicated in the infamous death.

    But the identity of the chart-topper?s killer has remained a mystery for more than 20 years and no charges have ever been brought.

    'Tupac Shakur is alive': Ex-bodyguard Michael Nice claims he helped the rapper escape to Cuba just after reports of his death in 1996

  8. #183
    Moderator Jumaki15's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blighted star View Post
    *cough*bullshit*cough*

  9. #184
    Senior Member blighted star's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumaki15 View Post
    *cough*bullshit*cough*
    To be fair, he might've just seen their holograms hanging out together

  10. #185
    Senior Member PeaceBeWithMe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blighted star View Post

    Um, how do we know HE wasn't smuggled off to Cuba, TOO???


    Quote Originally Posted by marshmallow View Post
    did you make her into a wallet Bill? cuz if you did I'm off team Bill.

  11. #186
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    I say Montel Williams.

  12. #187
    Senior Member blighted star's Avatar
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    https://mobile.twitter.com/ljcambria...26279449333760












    If we have any lurkers who are having trouble understanding why it's funny because they think they really do look identical, do this prosopagnosia test & all will be revealed :

    https://facememory.psy.uwa.edu.au

  13. #188
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i9eLiBmQC68

    Here is another conspiracy theories on the Atrazine part 3. Here is the rest of the controversy.

  14. #189
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    https://www.vox.com/2019/4/11/182910...ancy-rosenblum

    Are we living in a golden age of conspiracy theories?

    That?s the argument Harvard politics professor Nancy L. Rosenblum makes in her new book, A Lot of People Are Saying. And it?s not merely that conspiracy theories are thriving ? they?re also getting more absurd, less substantive, and harder to refute.

    In fact, what we?re seeing now, according to Rosenblum and her co-author Russell Muirhead, is more ?conspiracism? and less theory. Which is to say, the purpose of conspiracy theories is no longer to explain reality or offer some account of the world; instead, the point is to erode trust in public figures or institutions.

    She points to the recent Pizzagate conspiracy as a perfect example. This was a fake news story alleging that Hillary Clinton and her former campaign chair, John Podesta, ran a child sex ring in the basement of a pizzeria in Washington, DC. It was totally fabricated, but it proliferated enough online that a man eventually showed up at the restaurant with an assault rifle and fired at least one shot.

    Rosenblum believes this new form of conspiracism amounts to a direct attack on the foundations of liberal democracy and what she calls ?knowledge-producing institutions.? As conspiracism takes root in our politics, she says, we lose our capacity to deliberate about the direction of the country. And ultimately, democracy itself becomes impossible.

    I spoke to Rosenblum about the nature of modern conspiracy theories and how they?ve evolved into an existential threat for democratic societies. A lightly edited transcript of our conversation follows.
    Sean Illing

    Why write a book about conspiracy theories now?
    Nancy Rosenblum

    Charges of conspiracy have in the last two years become a malignant element in public life, and I think it?s been really corrosive to our politics. But what struck me and my co-author was this intrusion of conspiracism, which we think is fundamentally different from conventional conspiracy theories.

    Not a day passes without some sort of conspiracist claim about rigged elections or fake news or something absurd like Pizzagate. And the cast of characters that are engaged in conspiracy charges now ranges from a compulsively conspiracist president to public officials ? elected representatives who either endorse these conspiracist claims or acquiesce to remain silent ? to conspiracy entrepreneurs and their followers.

    So it?s a not-insignificant part of our population, and it?s a common element now in public life.
    Sean Illing

    And how do you define a conspiracy theory?
    Nancy Rosenblum

    A conspiracy theory is an explanation of an event ? an event that seems otherwise unintelligible or improbable. And the explanation is that underneath what seems unintelligible is actually some sort of conspiracy or secret plot. Sometimes conspiracy theories are true, sometimes they?re false. It?s often hard to tell the difference, but in all cases, it?s an attempt at some reasoned explanation for a complicated event.
    Sean Illing

    So a conspiracy isn?t wrong by virtue of being a conspiracy theory, but it?s more likely to be wrong because it?s an attempt to take a complicated event and fit it into a broader narrative framework?
    Nancy Rosenblum

    That?s right, and I?m so glad you said that, because Wikipedia actually defines a conspiracy theory as a false threat of a conspiracy, and that?s not true. There are both progressive conspiracy theories that are not only true but have advanced American democracy, and there are total fabulations that are pure inventions.
    Sean Illing

    Can you give me an example of an accurate conspiracy theory and one that was totally fabricated?
    Nancy Rosenblum

    Examples of sheer fabulation would be the ?faked moon landing? (Stanley Kubrick actually filmed it in a studio) or that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is dead (the Democrats found a body double to deny her death in order to prevent President Trump from filling her seat on the Supreme Court). Or, more to the point, perhaps, the recent Pizzagate conspiracy.

    As far as useful progressive conspiracy theories go, a good example is the work by academics like Naomi Oreskes documenting conspiracies by the tobacco and fossil fuel industries to cast doubt on climate science, which actually refutes the climate hoax conspiracy that says global scientists are bribed to produce reports of catastrophic human-caused global warming.

    Or the Progressive movement in the early 20th century that cast corporate boardrooms and smoke-filled rooms of political bosses as potential roadblocks to democracy; the result of what they called ?muckraking? reporting on this corruption was democratic reforms that are still with us, like direct democracy and referenda, etc.
    Sean Illing

    I think of conspiracy theorists as people who have rejected a world they don?t fit into, and the theories themselves offer a way to make sense of it and invert the cause of the problem. In other words, if I?m unhappy or alienated, it?s not my fault; it?s these shadowy forces that are aligned against me. Plus, it gives the conspiracy theorist a sense of power ? they understand what?s really going on in a way no one else does.
    Nancy Rosenblum

    That?s probably the most common social psychological source of conspiracy thinking. People don?t fit in, they feel dispossessed or alienated or put upon by some elite or expert, and then they have a story that seems to make sense of why that has happened to them. It?s a kind of scapegoating.

    It?s incredibly empowering to believe you have the true picture of reality and that everyone else is delusional. And if you look at conspiracists today, even the wackiest, like those writing about QAnon, they see themselves as the cognoscenti. They understand how the world really works, and they understand that the rest of us are brainwashed.

    Again, I?d just add the caveat that some conspiracy theories are real and the people who engage in them are making a good-faith effort to explain what?s happening.
    Sean Illing

    The psychology of conspiracism seems to appeal to a wide range of people, some smart and some not. Why is that?
    Nancy Rosenblum

    Cognitive and political psychologists will tell you the cognitive afflictions that result in the worst and most zealous kind of conspiracy theory really are common; we all share them. We like to think that agents are the causes of things, rather than accidents or unintended consequences being the cause. We like to think there?s a proportionality between cause and effect, and that causes us to overreach for explanations.

    But there?s a difference between those people who earnestly want to know what?s happening and those who have a conspiracist mindset; the latter tend to see the world entirely that way. They tend to see the world in terms of enemies, not just events that need an explanation.

    Sean Illing

    In the book, you argue that conspiracy theorizing is different today, that we have the conspiracism without the theory. What does that mean?
    Nancy Rosenblum

    I mean that conspiracy theorizing today dispenses with the burden of explanation. In fact, sometimes, as in Pizzagate, there?s absolutely nothing that needs to be explained, and there?s no real demand for truth or facts. There are no actual dots that need to be connected to form a pattern.

    Instead, we have conspiracy charges that take a new form: bare assertion. Instead of trying to explain something that happened in the world, it?s about creating a narrative that itself becomes the reason for the conspiracism. And it even spreads in a much different way.

    For instance, much of the conspiracism today spreads through innuendo. You?ll hear people say, ?I just want to know more, I?m just asking questions.? Or, as President Trump likes to say, ?A lot of people are saying...? This is conspiracy without any theory. It?s about validating preexisting beliefs by constantly repeating false claims that reinforce what you already believe.

    So it?s not merely that someone thinks Hillary Clinton is an unworthy candidate; we have to make up a story about her sex trafficking in children. And by repeating these things and assenting to them, you?re signaling a kind of group affinity. Conspiracy without the theory has become a form of political participation.
    Sean Illing

    You also emphasize that the point of conspiracism today isn?t to explain but rather to delegitimize. Why is this a significant distinction?
    Nancy Rosenblum

    It?s a way to delegitimize what it means to know something at all. So you often find today that people don?t really care if something is totally true. They?re just looking for something they can hang their hat on, to create enough doubt to justify their core beliefs and sow cynicism at the same time.

    We think of this sort of conspiracism as an attempt to own reality. Trump is exhibit A: He has a compromised sense of reality that he imposes on the nation, for instance, when he lied about the crowd size at his inauguration.

    The conspiracists who traffic in this sort of dishonesty aren?t interested in arguments or evidence. It?s about confirming their picture of the world and undermining the institutions charged with reporting the truth in the first place. And it?s a declaration that only their way of knowing is credible and everyone else is brainwashed.

    We call this ?epistemic polarization?: There is no ground for argument or persuasion or even disagreement. And we think it is more profound and unbridgeable even than partisan polarization.
    Sean Illing



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