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Thread: Over 280 Passengers (Mostly Teenagers) killed In South Korean Ferry Disaster

  1. #76
    Senior Member TupeloHoney's Avatar
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    It's not getting much media attention, but there was a very young stewardess, like 22 years old I think, who died trying to save as many as the students as possible. Very sad. I'll have to find the story. I think I bookmarked it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Not your business View Post
    I will out think the fucking pants off of you and you would thank me for helping you out of them.

  2. #77
    Moderator bowieluva's Avatar
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    There's really nothing not horribly sad about any of this.

  3. #78
    Senior Member TupeloHoney's Avatar
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    I certainly can't argue with that, bowie.

    I'm phone posting because my hubby is using the computer, so maybe someone could be kind enough to paste this in for me. Much obliged ;)

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...s-bravery-crew

  4. #79
    Senior Member animosity's Avatar
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    South Korea ferry passengers recall moments of bravery from crew
    Public verdict against Sewol crew has been savage and quick but accounts of individual acts of heroism have also emerged

    Associated Press in Mokpo
    theguardian.com, Tuesday 22 April 2014 04.54 EDT

    As the ferry sank, some crew members gave their lifejackets to passengers. One refused to leave until she shepherded students off the ship, and was later found dead. Others worked from rescue boats to break windows with hammers and pull people trapped in cabins to safety.

    Nearly a week after the sinking of the South Korean ferry – with rising outrage over a death count that could eventually top 300 – the public verdict against the crew of the Sewol has been savage and quick. "Cowards!" social media users howled. "Unforgivable, murderous," South Korea's president, Park Geun-hye, said on Monday of the captain and some crew.

    Some fled the ferry, including the captain, but not all. At least seven of the 29 crew members are missing or dead, and several of those who survived stayed on or near the ship to help passengers.

    "His last words were: 'I'm on my way to save the kids,'" Ahn So-hyun told reportersof what her husband, missing crew member Yang Dae-hong, told her by cellphone as the ship began to sink. He was referring to the 323 high school students on the ferry, which was carrying a total of 476 people.

    More than 100 people are confirmed dead and nearly 200 more are still missing. Relatives, as well as many other South Koreans, are enraged, lashing out at what they see as a botched rescue operation and, most vehemently, at the captain. He and two crew members have been arrested, accused of negligence and abandoning people in need. Six other crew members have been detained – two of them on Tuesday – though prosecutors have yet to obtain arrest warrants for them.

    Captain Lee Joon-seok told passengers to stay in their cabins as the ferry listed and filled with water, then took at least half an hour to order an evacuation and apparently escaped on one of the first rescue boats.

    But passengers recall moments of quiet bravery from the crew. Passenger Koo Bon-hee, 36, told the Associated Press that there were not enough lifejackets for everyone in the area on the third floor where he and others waited. So crew members – two men and two women – didn't wear any so that all the passengers could have one.

    One of the first bodies recovered after the ferry sank was 22-year-old crew member Park Ji-young, who helped students evacuate until the last minute, even though she wasn't wearing a life vest, South Korean media reported. Witnesses told Yonhap news agency that she told students that crew members must stay on the ship until everyone else leaves, and that she would follow them after helping passengers.

    Crew members describe a terrible dilemma as the ship went down – should they flee the sinking ship or risk their lives to save others trapped below. The late evacuation order meant that by the time the crew got off the bridge, the tilt of the ship was so great they could barely walk, let alone rescue passengers.

    Oh Yong-seok, a 57-year-old helmsman, said he and four crew members worked from nearby boats to smash windows on the sinking ferry, dragging six passengers stuck in cabins to safety.

    Oh said that a first mate – who is detained – used his knowledge of the ship's layout to help direct rescuers as they worked to pull passengers on to rescue boats. He said he and his colleagues remained at sea trying to help until an official who appeared to be from the coastguard asked them to head to land.

    His eyes welling with tears, Oh said it breaks his heart to watch news of rescue attempts from a hospital room, where he's being treated for an injury to his foot. He's tormented over the likely deaths of children who are about the same age as his own.

    "We did hard work, but no media are talking about that," he said. "Instead, they say all crew members fled."

    Yang, the missing crew member, was dedicated to his job, said friend Lee Joung-hwa, a celebrity manager who met Yang six years ago on the ferry during an event she had organised there.

    "He was the type of guy who cared for the customers of the ferries from the moment they stepped on board," Lee said in an interview at the gymnasium in Jindo. She travelled there out of concern for her friend.

    Some crew members said they feel they cannot discuss their efforts to help because the public is so enraged.

    One crew member under investigation, an engineer, locked himself in a hotel room in Mokpo late on Sunday night after telling fellow crew members that he would kill himself, senior prosecutor Ahn Sang-don said. Police found a rope when they entered the room, but the engineer appeared to be unhurt, Ahn said.

    The engineer was among the two crew members detained on Tuesday, prosecutor Yang Jung-jin said. He had been held by the coastguard on Monday, but Ahn said then it was for his own safety.

    Crew members are also struggling to understand why the captain, whom some called kind-hearted, didn't stay on the ship longer or help oversee rescue operations.

    Oh said the captain tripped while the ship was listing and crashed into an iron door. Oh said he thought Lee might have left the ferry when he did because he was badly injured. He was surprised then to see in television footage that the captain was walking without much problem.

    "The captain should have stayed there,even if it meant his death," Oh said.
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  5. #80
    Senior Member Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    This Captain needs to be held responsible. Why the hell would he tell people to stay in their cabins and take up precious rescue time? I understand not wanting to panic people, but to do nothing at all? Despicable. I seem to remember watching a documentary on another Ferry disaster where they also told the passengers to stay where they are. And many lives were lost. I have a hard time finding the logic in this strategy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

  6. #81
    Shut your face, grandma! Nic B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    South Korea ferry passengers recall moments of bravery from crew
    Public verdict against Sewol crew has been savage and quick but accounts of individual acts of heroism have also emerged

    Associated Press in Mokpo
    theguardian.com, Tuesday 22 April 2014 04.54 EDT

    As the ferry sank, some crew members gave their lifejackets to passengers. One refused to leave until she shepherded students off the ship, and was later found dead. Others worked from rescue boats to break windows with hammers and pull people trapped in cabins to safety.

    Nearly a week after the sinking of the South Korean ferry – with rising outrage over a death count that could eventually top 300 – the public verdict against the crew of the Sewol has been savage and quick. "Cowards!" social media users howled. "Unforgivable, murderous," South Korea's president, Park Geun-hye, said on Monday of the captain and some crew.

    Some fled the ferry, including the captain, but not all. At least seven of the 29 crew members are missing or dead, and several of those who survived stayed on or near the ship to help passengers.

    "His last words were: 'I'm on my way to save the kids,'" Ahn So-hyun told reportersof what her husband, missing crew member Yang Dae-hong, told her by cellphone as the ship began to sink. He was referring to the 323 high school students on the ferry, which was carrying a total of 476 people.

    More than 100 people are confirmed dead and nearly 200 more are still missing. Relatives, as well as many other South Koreans, are enraged, lashing out at what they see as a botched rescue operation and, most vehemently, at the captain. He and two crew members have been arrested, accused of negligence and abandoning people in need. Six other crew members have been detained – two of them on Tuesday – though prosecutors have yet to obtain arrest warrants for them.

    Captain Lee Joon-seok told passengers to stay in their cabins as the ferry listed and filled with water, then took at least half an hour to order an evacuation and apparently escaped on one of the first rescue boats.

    But passengers recall moments of quiet bravery from the crew. Passenger Koo Bon-hee, 36, told the Associated Press that there were not enough lifejackets for everyone in the area on the third floor where he and others waited. So crew members – two men and two women – didn't wear any so that all the passengers could have one.

    One of the first bodies recovered after the ferry sank was 22-year-old crew member Park Ji-young, who helped students evacuate until the last minute, even though she wasn't wearing a life vest, South Korean media reported. Witnesses told Yonhap news agency that she told students that crew members must stay on the ship until everyone else leaves, and that she would follow them after helping passengers.

    Crew members describe a terrible dilemma as the ship went down – should they flee the sinking ship or risk their lives to save others trapped below. The late evacuation order meant that by the time the crew got off the bridge, the tilt of the ship was so great they could barely walk, let alone rescue passengers.

    Oh Yong-seok, a 57-year-old helmsman, said he and four crew members worked from nearby boats to smash windows on the sinking ferry, dragging six passengers stuck in cabins to safety.

    Oh said that a first mate – who is detained – used his knowledge of the ship's layout to help direct rescuers as they worked to pull passengers on to rescue boats. He said he and his colleagues remained at sea trying to help until an official who appeared to be from the coastguard asked them to head to land.

    His eyes welling with tears, Oh said it breaks his heart to watch news of rescue attempts from a hospital room, where he's being treated for an injury to his foot. He's tormented over the likely deaths of children who are about the same age as his own.

    "We did hard work, but no media are talking about that," he said. "Instead, they say all crew members fled."

    Yang, the missing crew member, was dedicated to his job, said friend Lee Joung-hwa, a celebrity manager who met Yang six years ago on the ferry during an event she had organised there.

    "He was the type of guy who cared for the customers of the ferries from the moment they stepped on board," Lee said in an interview at the gymnasium in Jindo. She travelled there out of concern for her friend.

    Some crew members said they feel they cannot discuss their efforts to help because the public is so enraged.

    One crew member under investigation, an engineer, locked himself in a hotel room in Mokpo late on Sunday night after telling fellow crew members that he would kill himself, senior prosecutor Ahn Sang-don said. Police found a rope when they entered the room, but the engineer appeared to be unhurt, Ahn said.

    The engineer was among the two crew members detained on Tuesday, prosecutor Yang Jung-jin said. He had been held by the coastguard on Monday, but Ahn said then it was for his own safety.

    Crew members are also struggling to understand why the captain, whom some called kind-hearted, didn't stay on the ship longer or help oversee rescue operations.

    Oh said the captain tripped while the ship was listing and crashed into an iron door. Oh said he thought Lee might have left the ferry when he did because he was badly injured. He was surprised then to see in television footage that the captain was walking without much problem.

    "The captain should have stayed there,even if it meant his death," Oh said.
    (Bolded part) is what pisses me off the most and is what made me think he needed to be held accountable in the first place. That is just ridiculous. Coward.


    Quote Originally Posted by marakisses View Post
    yes i said i will leave it under you storage he said cuddle with me i said shut up it over??? what am i doing wrong??

  7. #82
    Senior Member bermstalker's Avatar
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    Real pictures that the kids took on the boat. Plus, text messages they wrote. So Sad

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...gins-list.html






  8. #83
    Senior Member debk589's Avatar
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    This stat is disgusting:

    At the time, the ship was carrying 476 people, mostly from one high school. Only 174 people survived, including 22 of the 29 crew members.
    That fucking crew just abandoned those kids to save their own asses.

    That video was sad, clearly those kids had no idea the severity of the situation at that time. Even when they were saying "I guess we better record our last words" they were giggling, like they never believed they were really about to die in there. So sad.

  9. #84
    Senior Member of_corpse_not's Avatar
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    Seoul, South Korea (CNN) -- The captain and three other crew members of the Sewol, the South Korean ferry that sank last month, have been charged with murder, chief prosecutor in the investigation Yang Joon-jin said Thursday.

    The captain, Lee Joon-seok, along with the chief engineer, and the first and second mates, could face the death penalty if convicted of the charges. But it has been nearly two decades since the capital punishment was last carried out in South Korea.

    The remaining 11 crew members have been indicted on charges of abandonment and violating a ship safety act.


    The prosecutor's office said the captain and three crew members were charged with murder, because they didn't use the ship's facilities at their disposal -- such as life rafts, life vests and announcements to evacuate passengers.
    Ferry CEO charged with negligence
    Ferry disaster caused by cargo overload
    Confusion, anger after ferry disaster
    Photos: South Korean ferry sinks Photos: South Korean ferry sinks

    Seven crew members were first to flee the ship, instead of carrying out their responsibility to save the hundreds that remained inside the ferry, the office said. Passengers were instructed not to move and to stay in place as the ferry listed.

    The Sewol ferry sank en route to Jeju Island on April 16, killing 284 people and leaving 20 others still missing. Most of the passengers were students on a school field trip.

    Obstacles in search efforts

    South Korean officials have recovered 242 bodies found inside the ferry and 42 outside the ship.

    The maritime police expects search efforts to become more difficult as the currents could strengthen over the next three days. Operations will be limited, Kim Seok-kyun, head of maritime police, said during a briefing Thursday.

    The internal structure of the ship, which has been submerged for a month, is becoming weaker and more prone to collapse. Authorities are looking into the possibility of cutting into the exterior of the ship to make an entrance using the cranes situated at the accident site.

    Conduct during sinking

    On April 16, the order to evacuate ship was never given, prosecutors said. And none of the crew were prepared to deal with an emergency situation because they had never been trained for such a scenario.

    A few days after the incident, Lee initially defended his actions, saying he had not evacuated passengers because the rescue boats had not arrived yet, and the tide was strong, and the water cold.

    Footage of the captain in what looks like his underwear hopping into the arms of the rescuer, while hundreds of passengers remained inside the sinking ship, infuriated South Koreans.

    Lee had not been at helm of the ferry when it started to sink.

    The Sewol disaster caused widespread outrage in South Korea over lax safety standards and the failure to rescue more people as the ship foundered.

    Investigators are looking at the overloading, the failure to secure cargo properly, the imbalance of weight on the ferry, and a sudden turn on the ferry as possible reasons for the Sewol's sinking.
    http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/15/world/...html?hpt=hp_t2

  10. #85
    Senior Member songbirdsong's Avatar
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    Refresh my memory: Why was he in his underwear? I know that he was in his cabin when shit went down, but I find it surprising that he wouldn't snatch a pair of pants.
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    Just as I suspected. A ring of elderly pedophiles.
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  11. #86
    Senior Member blighted star's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by songbirdsong View Post
    Refresh my memory: Why was he in his underwear? I know that he was in his cabin when shit went down, but I find it surprising that he wouldn't snatch a pair of pants.
    Yes. I wondered too. Perhaps he was pressing his slacks on the cabin ironing board to maintain a crisp trouser seam in true dedication to company pride ... or ...


    ... was any other crew member recovered in a state of undress?

  12. #87
    Senior Member Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    I'm glad.

    I don't give a shit if he was in his skivies or why. He abandoned the ship after giving instructions for everyone else to stay put and more than half of his passengers died. Rescue people in your pants: win. Rescue people in your skivies : win. Take off like a little piece of shit and leave hundreds to die: fucking scum.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

  13. #88
    Senior Member blighted star's Avatar
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    I've got a feeling it's eventually going to turn out that their ferry industry is much like our trucking industry. Big bosses who have no concern for employee training & safety & even less for their "cargo" & the general public who get in the way of their work

    - not that it excuses in the slightest the actions of the senior crew. There were clearly young stewardesses with less knowledge & training who gave their lives trying to do the job their senior officers should have been doing for them (unless the following article is accurate & they were physically prevented from accessing passenger areas because of the excessive number of freight containers the owner had loaded onto the ferry)

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-27342967

    South Korea Sewol ferry: What we know

    Timeline of events

    15 April, 21:00: The Sewol should have set sail on its regular overnight journey from Incheon to the volcanic island of Jeju at 18:30 on the evening of 15 April. It is delayed by fog and eventually departs at about 21:00.

    According to the manifest, there are 476 people on board, 443 of whom are passengers, including a school party of 325 students and their teachers from Ansan high school. However, the number of total passengers may have been higher.



    16 April: By morning the ship is sailing through a treacherous area of water near Jindo island when it makes a sharp turn and begins to list severely.

    It is not clear why this sudden turn is made, but Captain Lee Joon-seok is not on the bridge at the time and an inexperienced third mate, Park Han-kyul is navigating.

    Automatic Identification System data released later by authorities, shows that as the ferry turns, it loses control and begins drifting sideways.

    The Sewol quickly begins to capsize.

    16 April, approx 08:52: As the ship leans over, the first distress call comes not from the crew but from one of the students, a teenage boy who dials the national emergency number.

    "Save us! We're on a ship and I think it's sinking," the boy tells the fire officer on land who takes the call.

    08:55: A few minutes later, at 8:55, the crew calls for help, contacting Jeju Harbour Affairs. Transcripts reveal an increasingly desperate interchange between the ship and shore.

    Meanwhile announcements are broadcast telling passengers to stay where they are. Mobile phone footage retrieved from the victims later shows frightened students in life vests discussing whether to obey or try to escape.

    08:55 - 09:37: Harbour Affairs at Jeju and at Jindo island, much closer to the ferry's location, both urge the crew to get passengers ready for evacuation.

    But Captain Lee seeks assurance that rescue is at hand. He later says he was concerned that people would be swept away by currents if they entered the swift cold water.

    The crew are also trapped in the bridge by the angle at which the ship is tilted and by fallen containers, so cannot reach the passengers.

    09:30: Coastguard boats and helicopters begin arriving. The captain says the ferry is now tilted 60 degrees.

    09:37: In the final communication, the crew says an evacuation order has been given and some passengers are escaping on the port side.

    Over the next two hours, a total of 172 passengers and crew are rescued but many more are trapped inside as the ship slips beneath the waves.

    The state of the ship

    The Sewol's owners, Chonghaejin Marine Company, redesigned the ferry to create additional passenger space, after purchasing it from Japanese owners in 2012.

    It passed a safety inspection by the Korean Register of Shipping with the proviso that it would have to carry more ballast water and less cargo to offset the extra weight at the top.

    However, investigators are looking at reports that the ferry was routinely overloaded. An off-duty captain also said he had warned the ship's owner that it had become unstable.

    When disaster struck it was carrying 3,608 tonnes of cargo including 108 vehicles while the recommended limit was 987 tonnes.

    It had 580 tonnes of ballast water on board, only 37% of the legal requirement, making it dangerously unbalanced, South Korean news agency Yonhap said, citing investigators.

    Chonghaejin Marine Company's financial records show that cargo had become an increasingly important part of its income in recent years as budget airlines cornered the passenger market.

    Officials took the ship's entire navigational crew of 15 into custody and made further arrests on shore. The captain and three other crew have been charged with manslaughter.

    An interim investigation found that a sharp turn was the main cause of the sinking but the overloading of cargo and the lack of water in ballast tanks made recovery from its sharp turn difficult, Yonhap said.

    Divers are still searching for bodies in the sunken ferry and only when the last has been found can a salvage operation begin.

    Experts propose using a floating dock which would be positioned underneath the Sewol in order to bring it to the surface.

    Parts of the hull have started to collapse and although sea cranes are already on the scene, raising the ship is a complex operation, likely to take several months.

    Mobile phone footage shows passengers obeying instructions to stay put

    Investigators are looking at reasons the Sewol capsized


    S Korea ferry survivors 'miscounted' 07MAY2014, ASIA Diver dies in S Korea ferry search 06MAY2014, ASIA South Korea ferry capsize toll rises 04MAY2014, ASIA View above sunken South Korea ferry 01MAY2014, ASIA Retrieved phones record ferry sinking 01MAY2014, ASIA Warnings on S Korea ferry 'ignored' 30APRIL2014, ASIA S Korea president in ferry apology 29APRIL2014, ASIA

    Timeline of events

    15 April, 21:00: The Sewol should have set sail on its regular overnight journey from Incheon to the volcanic island of Jeju at 18:30 on the evening of 15 April. It is delayed by fog and eventually departs at about 21:00.

    According to the manifest, there are 476 people on board, 443 of whom are passengers, including a school party of 325 students and their teachers from Ansan high school. However, the number of total passengers may have been higher.

    Civilian diver dies in South Korea ferry search


    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-27289330



    A civilian diver searching for bodies in the South Korean ferry that sank last month has died, authorities say.

    Officials said the 53-year-old, known only by his surname Lee, became unconscious and later died in hospital.

    He is the first fatality among divers searching the Sewol ferry, which sank on 16 April with 476 people on board.

    Only 174 people survived, with many trapped inside the vessel. So far the disaster has claimed 262 lives, with 40 others missing.

    State news agency Yonhap reported that Mr Lee was a veteran crew member of Undine Marine Industries, which specialises in maritime engineering and rescue work.

    He had lost consciousness shortly after diving into waters 25m deep in the early hours of Tuesday.

    Fellow divers lost communication with him five minutes into his dive and later pulled him to the surface. It was his first search attempt in the Sewol, according to the authorities.

    Prime Minister Chung Hong-won has since ordered government officials overseeing the rescue operation to thoroughly check divers' health conditions.





    vers have been battling bad weather and fast currents to retrieve bodies over the past three weeks. Inside the ferry, they must also navigate floating debris and the maze of corridors, reports say.

    Yonhap said another civilian diver, aged 31, fell unconscious last week after diving four times before daybreak.

    Several others have also been treated at hyperbaric oxygen therapy centres.

    Authorities said divers were now working their way to the last three unopened rooms next to a snack bar on the ferry's third floor.

    But they did not expect to find many bodies there as they were not occupied by the high school students who were the majority of the passengers, a spokesman said. Divers would also recheck areas previously searched.

    Earlier this week, workers put out more nets around the site to prevent bodies floating away
    .
    Last edited by blighted star; 05-16-2014 at 12:39 AM.

  14. #89
    Senior Member animosity's Avatar
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    if i knew i might end up in the water, i'd be in my chonies too. less chance of drowning.
    Quote Originally Posted by songbirdsong View Post
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  15. #90
    Senior Member blighted star's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    if i knew i might end up in the water, i'd be in my chonies too. less chance of drowning.
    Good point. We had to do a life-saving certificate at the weird school I went to in 7th grade, where we had to jump into the 15ft deep school diving pool in heavy winter clothing, including lace up boots & a woollen jumper. We had to tread water til we were fully water-logged, then get the jumper off over our heads while still treading water, then the shoes & jeans & the rest.

    It was incredibly hard. The boy next to me was crying & nearly drowned. I don't know if they still make people do the test that way, but it certainly gives you an insight into just how heavy clothes get & how hard it is to strip down after you've ended up in the water

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    S. Korean ferry captain gets 36 years in prison

    http://news.yahoo.com/korean-ferry-c...053657461.html

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) ? A South Korean ferry captain was sentenced Tuesday to 36 years in prison for negligence and abandoning passengers when his ship sank earlier this year, but the court acquitted him of homicide, concluding there was no proof he knew his actions would cause the more than 300 deaths that shocked and outraged the country.

    The highly anticipated verdict came on the same day searches were called off for the final nine victims and amid continuing grief and finger-pointing over one of the worst disasters in South Korean history. Victims' relatives immediately criticized the sentences for Capt. Lee Joon-seok and other crew members as too lenient, some weeping and shouting during the court proceedings.

    "Do you know how many children are dead?" one relative said, according to a defense lawyer.

    The Gwangju District Court in southern South Korea also concluded in its ruling that Lee had issued an evacuation order and that he left the ship after rescue boats arrived on the scene, the court's statement said.

    Most of the ferry passengers were teenage students taking a school trip, and many student survivors have said they were repeatedly ordered over a loudspeaker to stay on the sinking ship and that they didn't remember any evacuation order being given before they helped each other flee the vessel.

    Lee, 69, has said he issued an evacuation order. But he told reporters days after his arrest that he withheld the evacuation order because rescuers had yet to arrive and he feared for the passengers' safety in the cold, swift waters.

    The widely vilified captain could have received a death sentence had he been convicted on the homicide charge.

    The court sentenced the ship's chief engineer to 30 years in prison and 13 other crew members to up to 20 years in prison, the statement said.

    The engineer, Park Ki-ho, was convicted of homicide because he abandoned two injured colleagues, escaped the ferry and failed to tell rescuers about them, even though he knew they would die without help, the court said.

    However, it cleared two other crew members of homicide charges for the same reasons it acquitted the captain. Those crew members got 15 and 20 years in prison, it said.

    Prosecutors and the crew members have one week to appeal, according to the court. Relatives of the victims said in a statement they will ask prosecutors to appeal the ruling but senior prosecutor Park Jae-eok said his office hasn't decided whether to appeal.

    The 15 crew members tasked with navigating the ferry Sewol have faced scathing public criticism because they escaped the sinking ship while many passengers were still trapped. A total of 476 people were aboard the ship and only 172 were rescued in the April disaster.

    Prosecutors have accused the crew members of tacitly colluding to abandon the ship even though they knew that passengers would be trapped and killed after it sank. The defense in the trial has denied any collusion among the crew members, saying they were confused, injured and panicked.

    Nearly seven months after the sinking, 295 bodies have been recovered but nine are missing. Officials said Tuesday they've ended searches because there was only a remote chance of finding more bodies while worries have grown over the safety of divers. Two civilian divers have died after falling unconscious during searches.

    "As our loved ones remain trapped in the cold waters, this decision is unbearably painful for us. But we requested that the search operations be stopped" because of safety concerns, Min Dong-im, 36, the wife of a missing teacher, tearfully said at a televised news conference.

    The sinking has prompted widespread grief and a rare bout of soul-searching about lax safety practices in South Korea. Authorities blamed overloaded cargo, improper storage, untimely rescue efforts and corruption by the ship's owners that prevented enough spending on safety, along with the crew members' behavior, for the sinking.

    The ship's billionaire owner was found dead about four months ago after fleeing arrest, and three of his relatives were sentenced last week to up to three years in prison for corruption. Last Friday, South Korean lawmakers approved plans to disband the coast guard and transfer its responsibilities.

    South Korea has spent months debating public safety issues that critics say were largely ignored while the country rose to an Asian economic power in the decades after the 1950-53 Korean War. But a series of smaller deadly accidents have occurred since the sinking. In mid-October, 16 people watching an outdoor pop concert fell to their deaths when a ventilation grate they were standing on collapsed.

  17. #92
    Senior Member puzzld's Avatar
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    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) ? The South Korean ferry captain responsible for last year's disaster that killed more than 300 people, mostly school children, was given an increased sentence of life in prison Tuesday by an appellate court that convicted him of homicide.

    A district court in November had sentenced Lee Joon-seok to 36 years in prison for negligence and abandoning passengers in need but acquitted him of homicide. Victims' relatives criticized the verdict at the time, saying it was too lenient. Prosecutors earlier had demanded the death penalty for Lee.

    Lee's sentence was increased because the Gwangju High Court additionally convicted him on the homicide charges while upholding most of other charges that led to his November conviction, according to a court statement.

    The appellate court sentenced 14 other navigation crew members to 18 months to 12 years in prison, the statement said. In November they had received sentences of five to 30 years in prison.

    The court said it decided on Lee's homicide conviction because he fled the ship without making any evacuation order though he, as a captain, is required by law to take some measures to rescue his passengers.

    Lee's behavior was "homicide by willful negligence," the court judged. "For whatever excuses, it's difficult to forgive Lee Joon-seok's action that caused a big tragedy," the court statement cited the verdict as saying.

    Lee and the 14 crew members have been the subject of fierce public anger because they were among the first people rescued from the ship when it began badly listing on the day of the sinking in April last year. Most of the victims were teenagers who were en route to a southern island for a school trip.

    Lee has said he issued an evacuation order, but the court statement said two of the 14 crew members acknowledged that there was no evacuation order. Many student survivors have said they were repeatedly ordered over a loudspeaker to stay on the sinking ship and that they didn't remember there any evacuation orders made by crewmembers before they helped each other to flee the ship.

    Court spokesman Jeon Ilho said both prosecutors and the crew members have one week to appeal the verdicts.

    A year after sinking, 295 bodies have been retrieved but nine others are missing. There is still lingering public criticism against the government over its handling of the sinking, the country's deadliest maritime disaster in decades. Violence occurred during a Seoul rally led by relatives and their supporters earlier this month, leaving dozens of people injured.

    Last week, South Korea formally announced it would salvage the ship from the ocean floor off the country's southwest coast. Relatives of the victims hope that might locate the missing, including four students, and help reveal more details about the sinking. Some experts are skeptical about those wishes and remain opposed to spending taxpayer's money to lift the civilian vessel.

    Officials say the salvage job is estimated to cost $91 million to $137 million and take 12 to 18 months.

    Authorities blame excessive cargo, improper storage, botched negligence and other negligence for the sinking, and have arrested about 140 people. Critics say higher-level officials haven't been accountable.
    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/w...ence/26496217/
    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    lol at Nestle being some vicious smiter, she's the nicest person on this site besides probably puzzld. Or at least the last person to resort to smiting.
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    Why on earth would I smite you when I can ban you?

  18. #93
    Senior Member Caffeinatedkat's Avatar
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    Thanks for the update, I did not even know this happened till now!

    Mommy to: Misty-Allison-Elliot-Sebastian-Quinn
    And our newest rugrat MISS MARLEE!!!

  19. #94
    Senior Member Jumaki15's Avatar
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    Salvage operators raise Sewol ferry
    About 300 people, mostly high school students, died when it went aground and capsized in waters off Jindo, South Jeolla Province, nearly three years ago. Nine are still unaccounted for.

    Salvage operators said they began to raise the sunken ship and part of its structure was revealed above the water around 3:45 a.m. nearly three years after the disaster took place.

    If the entire ferry will be raised, two salvage barges will move the hull on a semisubmersible ship, which will carry it to the port of Mokpo, according to a news report.

    The Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries, which controls the salvage operation, expects that it will take about 12-13 days to lift the ship and move it into Mokpo.

    With some of the bereaved families watching from boats, engineers began the salvage operation at 8:50 p.m., which involves lifting the 145-meter-long, 6,850-ton passenger vessel without cutting it into pieces.

    “The wreckage was lifted about 1 meter off the seabed at around 3:30 p.m.,” the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries told reporters.

    Many Koreans hoped for the ship’s safe but swift recovery Wednesday.

    “We thank all those who have supported us. We need you once again to pray for the safe salvage of the ship and return of the nine (passengers) who are still in there,” said family members of the passengers whose bodies are still unaccounted for at a press conference at a port in Jindo, Wednesday.

    A conspicuously larger number of people paid a visit to a memorial in Ansan, Gyeonggi Province, for Sewol victims, praying for the ferry’s recovery and the return of those missing.

    “Three years have passed, I cannot imagine what the families have gone through. I wish the causes of the ferry sinking will come out to the surface as well,” said 59-year-old Song Cheol-sub.

    A center for bereaved families and a memorial classroom of Danwon High School in Ansan -- where most of the student victims attended -- also received a larger number of visitors and volunteers Wednesday.

    The ill-fated passenger ship was carrying 476 people to a southern resort island of Jeju when it sank on April 16, 2014. Just 172 passengers were rescued.

    The government had earlier this week said that the salvage effort will likely take place during the next neap tide on April 5.

    The ministry has been carefully reviewing the weather conditions around the site as it requires calm seas. To proceed with the salvage operation, waves should not exceed 1 meter in height and wind should be at less than 10 meters per second.

    Bad weather and high tides have several times delayed the resumption of operations to raise the wreckage of the ship.

    “We need to lift the ship at least 35 meters off from the seabed during the actual lifting. Then we will be able to see about 13 meters of the hull of the ferry above the surface, to be dried out and ready to dock to another vessel to be carried to land for inspection,” said Lee Cheol-jo, a ministry official in charge of the salvage project.

    If work goes smoothly, the whole process will take about 14 days, he added.

    The ship, lying on the sea floor on its left side, would normal weigh 8,300 metric tons according to the ministry, but water, stones and sand inside has increased that to about 20,000 metric tons.

    The government announced the salvage operation plan in 2015, but the timeline for raising Sewol has been repeatedly postponed due to adverse weather and technical problems.
    Salvage operators raise Sewol ferry

    Happened about a year ago but never posted.

  20. #95
    Senior Member songbirdsong's Avatar
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    Wow, I didn't realize there were still three unaccounted for. How awful.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    Just as I suspected. A ring of elderly pedophiles.
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    Fucking piece of shit, fucking scum, internet ass holes. fucking ingrate no life having fat ass. you have no fucking clue at whats going on fuck tard shit for brains.

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