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Thread: Bad Cops. BAD! BAD!

  1. #1926
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    https://www.wlwt.com/article/hamilto...-says/33322662

    A Hamilton County sheriff's deputy was fired Wednesday morning after he was charged with assault for kicking an inmate in the head while in custody.

    Sheriff Jim Neil said Sgt. Jesse Franklin has been terminated from the sheriff's office after an investigation revealed he used excessive force by kicking inmate Nick Ballachino in the head while handcuffed.

    Jesse Franklin finds himself on the other side of the law after 13 years at the Hamilton County Sheriff's Office.

    The former sergeant is captured on camera kicking an inmate who is handcuffed.

    Hamilton County Prosecutor Joseph Deters said the incident took place June 9 at the Hamilton County Justice Center.

    Deters said Ballachino was arrested by Cincinnati police for disorderly conduct while intoxicated and obstructing official business. He was then taken to the justice center for processing.

    When Ballachino arrived at the justice center, he started to get combative with the officers trying to process him, Deters said. While officers were trying to subdue him, Ballachino bit Franklin’s left foot.

    Franklin then immediately kicked Ballachino one time in the head. Franklin was wearing work boots at the time, Deters said.

    Ballachino's attorney, Fanon Rucker, is thankful there was video evidence.

    "Unless there's video. Unless there's audio. Unless there's a confession by someone involved, most of the time it's either not believed or it doesn't get the same credibility that it would if we do have a camera," Rucker said.

    Ballachino was taken to University Hospital where he was treated and released back to the justice center. He suffered a cut above his left eye which required five stitches.

    Rucker spoke with his client following Franklin's firing.

    "He was satisfied by that outcome, but you know, we have a long way to go. He's in treatment for his injuries," said Rucker.

    Rucker applauded the speedy response from the sheriff's office.

    He related this case to protests across the country against police brutality, saying the work is not done.

    "This is one half of the step that we think is important, but the other half is to ensure that this person, based on what he did very clearly on camera, that he not be allowed to work in law enforcement again," said Rucker.

    Franklin is charged with one count of assault (ORC ?2903.13 (A) Misdemeanor 1). The case will be transferred to the City of Cincinnati as they prosecute all misdemeanors that occur in the city limits. If convicted, Franklin faces up to six months in the justice center.

    “Not everyone has the temperament to be a police officer. In this case, and as I have throughout my career, when I see criminal violations, I will pursue them according to the law. Maintaining a professional, 21st century police force is expensive to society but pays for itself many times over. Actions like this are a harsh reminder that resources must be dedicated to recruiting the right kind of officers and ensuring that they have the proper equipment, knowledge, training and temperament to do the job that citizens want and expect,” Deters said.

    Rucker said he is still waiting to hear from the prosecutor's office about his request to charge Franklin with a civil rights violation.

  2. #1927
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    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/lap...2-in-palmdale/

    A Los Angeles Police Department officer has been charged in connection with a 2018 DUI crash that injured two people in Palmdale, officials announced Friday.

    Michael Anthony Keith, 35, faces one count each of driving under the influence of an alcoholic beverage causing injury and driving with a .08% blood alcohol content causing injury, according to the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office.

    The crash occurred on April 26, 2018, when Keith was driving north on the 14 Freeway. He allegedly veered off the road and crashed into a parked SUV with two people inside, officials said.

    The victims were taken to a hospital and treated for unknown injuries.

    Keith was off-duty at the time of the crash and it is unknown if he was injured.

    The case against Keith was filed on Thursday and he is scheduled to be arraigned Friday.

    If convicted as charged, he could face a maximum sentence of nine years in prison, according to the DA’s office.

    The case remains under investigation by the California Highway Patrol.

  3. #1928
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    https://fox2now.com/news/missouri/tw...-traffic-stop/

    VELDA CITY, Mo. – The St. Louis County Prosecutor announced charges against two Velda City police officers for a February 25 shooting.

    The two officers, Christopher Gage and Matthew Schanz, are charged with first-degree assault and armed criminal action.

    St. Louis County Prosecutor Wesley Bell says the officers pulled the vehicle over for expired temporary tags. The traffic stop was at Octavia Avenue and W. Florissant in Flordell Hills.

    Bell says the two officers say they smelled the odor of marijuana coming from the car. One officer said he intended to search the car without probable cause and would arrest the driver if he found any marijuana.

    Bell said the driver then drove off. One of the officers is accused of falsely reporting over the radio that the driver tried to run him over.

    Bell said the driver turned around at the end of the road because it was a dead end. He explained that as the driver came back down the road, the two officers were not in the road, but standing in a parking lot.

    Bell says one officer walked into the path of the car, yelling down the road for the car to stop and then fired into the vehicle. The other officer is also accused of firing at the vehicle.

  4. #1929
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    https://bakersfieldnow.com/news/loca...sexual-offense

    BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KBAK/KBFX) — District Attorney Cynthia Zimmer announced today that charges have been filed against Brian Pardue, an officer with the California Highway Patrol in the Bakersfield area.

    Brian Pardue is charged with two counts:

    Count 1: Penal Code Section 288.3: Attempt to contact a minor with intent to commit sexual offense, a felony
    Count 2: Penal Code Section 288.4(a)(1): Arrangement of meeting with a person believed to be a minor with intent to commit a sexual offense, a misdemeanor.

    The charges are alleged to have occurred on July 3, 2020, and involve digital communications with an undercover law enforcement officer who identified in the communications as an underage minor.

    Pardue was arraigned on the charges on Friday, July 24, where his attorney entered not guilty pleas on his behalf. Pardue has posted bail in the amount of $52,500, and has a preliminary hearing scheduled for September 16, 2020.

  5. #1930
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    https://www.kitv.com/story/42379954/...ury-indictment

    A retired police detective from Hilo was arrested Thursday after he was indicted by a grand jury on multiple charges.

    56-year-old Brian Miller turned himself in at the East Hawai'i Detention Facility following a grand jury indictment, which stemmed from a May 14 incident in Hilo.

    The indictment alleges Miller is guilty of intimidating a witness, tampering with a witness, retaliating against a witness, terroristic threatening in the second degree and harassment.

    Miller was released after posting $50,000 bail. His next court appearance is scheduled for next Tuesday in Kona Circuit Court.
    A Hawaii Police officer is accused of Police corruption.

  6. #1931
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    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/swa...-deadly-force/

    After assessing the hilly terrain around a Sunland house where a homeless man had holed up one morning in May 2017, the Los Angeles Police Department’s heavily armed SWAT team requested more firepower — and got it in the form of a helicopter equipped for “aerial shooting,” dubbed “Sniper-1.”

    By the time they’d left the scene hours later, the team had fired more than 40 rounds at 29-year-old Anthony Soderberg, including more than a dozen from the helicopter — a first in LAPD history. Many of the rounds were fired from hundreds of feet away, and many came after a bloodied and unarmed Soderberg had exited the home, rolled off the edge of a patio and dropped into a ravine, where he’d later be pronounced dead.

    The Los Angeles Police Commission ruled that the officers had opened fire when they were not in imminent danger or when they were too far away to determine if a threat existed. Of 13 officers investigated, the commission ruled that 12 had used deadly force in a way that “was not objectively reasonable and was out of policy.”

    It was one of three incidents that a SWAT officer reported to LAPD internal affairs early last year as part of a whistleblower complaint about the elite unit.

  7. #1932
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    https://omaha.com/news/national/joe-...xtual-fallback

    PHOENIX (AP) — Joe Arpaio on Friday was narrowly defeated in his bid to win back the sheriff’s post in metro Phoenix that he held for 24 years before being voted out in 2016 amid voter frustrations over his taxpayer-funded legal bills, his penchant for self-promotion and a defiant streak that led to his now-pardoned criminal conviction.

    Arpaio lost by more than 6,200 votes in the Republican primary for Maricopa County sheriff to his former top aide, Jerry Sheridan.

    In the Nov. 3 general election, Sheridan will face Democrat Paul Penzone, who unseated Arpaio four years ago.

    Arpaio said he believes some supporters who have thanked him in recent years for his service really meant they wanted him to move on from politics.

    “What they meant is it’s time to go fishing,” said Arpaio, who isn’t an angler. “I still took a shot at it. I’m not ashamed. I could have won this one.”

    The loss marked Arpaio’s second failed attempt to return to politics. He ran an unsuccessful primary campaign for U.S. Senate in 2018, not long after President Donald Trump had pardoned his 2017 criminal contempt of court conviction for disobeying a judge’s order in a racial profiling case.

    As metro Phoenix’s sheriff from 1992 through 2016, Arpaio rose to political prominence by creating old-time chain gangs and housing inmates in tents during triple-digit heat. But he is most well-known for launching immigration crackdowns, some of which contributed significantly to his political downfall.

    While his defiant streak played well with voters for many years, Arpaio faced heavy criticism for taking on policies that he knew were controversial and racking up $147 million in taxpayer-funded legal bills. His agency also botched the investigations of more than 400 sex-crimes complaints made to his office.

    His political fortunes started to decline significantly in 2013 when his officers were found by a federal judge to have racially profiled Latinos in Arpaio’s traffic patrols that targeted immigrants.

    In his latest campaign, Arpaio got only a fraction of the campaign money he was famous for raising and was criticized for his conviction. Arpaio said many people didn’t know he was running until they saw his name on the ballot.

    His platform consisted of his unwavering support for Trump and bringing back practices that the courts have either deemed illegal or his successor has ended, such as immigration crackdowns.

    He also was facing a far more moderate electorate than in earlier campaigns.

    In the profiling case, both Arpaio and Sheridan were found in civil contempt of court for disobeying a 2011 court order to stop the sheriff’s immigration patrols, leading to Arpaio’s criminal contempt conviction in 2017. Sheridan wasn’t charged with criminal contempt.

    Arpaio and Sheridan vigorously dispute the contempt findings. Sheridan, a 38-year veteran of the sheriff’s office who retired after Arpaio was defeated in 2016, said he was unaware of the highly publicized court order and didn’t run the unit that carried out the immigration patrols.

    Sheridan said he could help turn around the tarnished law enforcement agency and insisted that he is his own man.

    Sheridan didn't immediately return call seeking comment on his primary victory.

    Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

  8. #1933
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    https://rappler.com/nation/jovie-esp...erte-drug-list

    One of President Rodrigo Duterte's most lauded cops is on his own drug list

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    MANILA, Philippines – Lieutenant Colonel Jovie Espenido, one of the poster boys of President Rodrigo Duterte’s unrelenting but lagging anti-illegal drugs campaign, is on the President’s notorious drug list.

    This was confirmed to Rappler by two police generals privy to the list on Wednesday, February 12, speaking on condition of anonymity for their security.

    Espenido’s inclusion in the list is a blow to the Duterte government’s anti-drug campaign, as he is among few cops whom President Duterte praised in his so-called “drug war" after he led the operation that led to the killing of Ozamiz City Mayor Reynaldo Parojinog.

    Rappler has sought the comment of Espenido through text message on Wednesday, but he has yet to reply as of posting.

    Espenido’s inclusion: On Friday, PNP chief General Archie Gamboa convened a meeting with cops included in the President’s drug list, all sacked from their posts and placed under Gamboa’s office because of their inclusion.

    One of the cops present in the Camp Crame National Headquarters meeting was Espenido, surprising officials in the conference.

    Who’s Espenido again? Lieutenant Colonel Jovie Espenido catapulted himself to national fame after he masterminded the anti-drug operation that led to the death of Ozamiz City Mayor Reynaldo Parojinog and 14 others, including his wife Susan, brother Octavio Jr, and sister Mona. He was also the chief of the Albuera town police when its mayor, Rolando Espinosa, was killed by cops during the service of a warrant in his detention cell. (READ: Jovie Espenido sans the uniform)


    After the operations, Espenido was hailed by Duterte, who even verbally gave him the order that he was “free to kill everybody” after promoting him to lead the Bacolod City police's operations arm. But on Wednesday, February 5, Espenido was relieved from his post, puzzling his colleagues. It turned out that it was because he was on Duterte’s own drug list.

    What happened in the meeting? Without disclosing names of cops present in the meeting, Gamboa told reporters on Monday, February 10, that he urged the cops who knew they were guilty, to avail of early retirement to cut themselves off from the police organization.

    Gamboa then ordered officials not to speak to reporters about the meeting and about the cops included in the drug list, emphasizing that the cops are still innocent until proven guilty.

    What Espenido’s inclusion means: Espenido on the drug list does not automatically mean that he is involved in drugs. It has been repeatedly reported that the administration has holes in its record-keeping, and that its process has been opaque to the public.

    No less than Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA) chief Director General Aaron Aquino once said that the drug list was “not airtight” and that they don’t have enough proof to defend their allegations before the courts. Despite this, the Duterte government has released names on the list, most notably before village and senatorial elections.

    Special treatment? One of the generals Rappler spoke to expressed concern about Espenido’s inclusion, worrying that the police command allowed Espenido’s promotion from Ozamiz to Bacolod despite knowing he was on the drug list.

    The 357 cops on Duterte’s drug list will be undergoing “adjudication” – their process of double-checking whether the cops deserved to be listed in the first place. The final decision whether a cop will be kept or removed from the list will fall on the table of Duterte. – Rappler.com





    Now a police chief in Visayas, Philippines who has been known to order acts of police brutality in the country has been called out for being on the Drug registry lists.

    Yes Police Corruption is an issue here and the chief is a hypocrite!!!

    MANILA, Philippines — Lt. Col. Jovie Espenido, considered among President Rodrigo Duterte’s top enforcers in his drug war, suspects politicians to be behind his inclusion in the narcolist.

    In a phone interview Monday night with the Inquirer, Espenido said: “Why is the PNP [Philippine National Police] treating me this way?”

    He was apparently frustrated as he joined 355 other policemen set for validation by the national adjudication board in Camp Crame.

    He pointed out that, seeing himself as a public servant, he had enforced the campaign against illegal drugs as ordered and undertaken it to the best of his abilities.

    Finding himself in the narcolist was a shock to him and having to undergo another adjudication process, excruciating.

    He pointed out that he sought the exclusion of his name from the narcolist in 2017, petitioning the PNP Directorate for Intelligence for the removal. He said there was already a resolution then.


    According to Espenido, he felt hurt that the higher ranking police officers he toiled for in the war on drugs still doubted his character, proof of which is his name still being in the narcolist.

    He did not discount the possibility that politicians — he did not say whether local or national — could have influenced the retention of his name on the narcolist.

    Espenido maintained that he had never gotten involved in the narcotics trade, saying: “As a policeman I have always fought illegal drugs, moreso now that President Duterte declared war against it. Why would I now get involved in illegal drugs?”

    /atm



    Read more: https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/122997...#ixzz6UV6UNIYS
    Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

  9. #1934
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    https://rappler.com/nation/jovie-esp...erte-drug-list

    One of President Rodrigo Duterte's most lauded cops is on his own drug list

    ADVERTISEMENT


    MANILA, Philippines ? Lieutenant Colonel Jovie Espenido, one of the poster boys of President Rodrigo Duterte?s unrelenting but lagging anti-illegal drugs campaign, is on the President?s notorious drug list.

    This was confirmed to Rappler by two police generals privy to the list on Wednesday, February 12, speaking on condition of anonymity for their security.

    Espenido?s inclusion in the list is a blow to the Duterte government?s anti-drug campaign, as he is among few cops whom President Duterte praised in his so-called ?drug war" after he led the operation that led to the killing of Ozamiz City Mayor Reynaldo Parojinog.

    Rappler has sought the comment of Espenido through text message on Wednesday, but he has yet to reply as of posting.

    Espenido?s inclusion: On Friday, PNP chief General Archie Gamboa convened a meeting with cops included in the President?s drug list, all sacked from their posts and placed under Gamboa?s office because of their inclusion.

    One of the cops present in the Camp Crame National Headquarters meeting was Espenido, surprising officials in the conference.

    Who?s Espenido again? Lieutenant Colonel Jovie Espenido catapulted himself to national fame after he masterminded the anti-drug operation that led to the death of Ozamiz City Mayor Reynaldo Parojinog and 14 others, including his wife Susan, brother Octavio Jr, and sister Mona. He was also the chief of the Albuera town police when its mayor, Rolando Espinosa, was killed by cops during the service of a warrant in his detention cell. (READ: Jovie Espenido sans the uniform)


    After the operations, Espenido was hailed by Duterte, who even verbally gave him the order that he was ?free to kill everybody? after promoting him to lead the Bacolod City police's operations arm. But on Wednesday, February 5, Espenido was relieved from his post, puzzling his colleagues. It turned out that it was because he was on Duterte?s own drug list.

    What happened in the meeting? Without disclosing names of cops present in the meeting, Gamboa told reporters on Monday, February 10, that he urged the cops who knew they were guilty, to avail of early retirement to cut themselves off from the police organization.

    Gamboa then ordered officials not to speak to reporters about the meeting and about the cops included in the drug list, emphasizing that the cops are still innocent until proven guilty.

    What Espenido?s inclusion means: Espenido on the drug list does not automatically mean that he is involved in drugs. It has been repeatedly reported that the administration has holes in its record-keeping, and that its process has been opaque to the public.

    No less than Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA) chief Director General Aaron Aquino once said that the drug list was ?not airtight? and that they don?t have enough proof to defend their allegations before the courts. Despite this, the Duterte government has released names on the list, most notably before village and senatorial elections.

    Special treatment? One of the generals Rappler spoke to expressed concern about Espenido?s inclusion, worrying that the police command allowed Espenido?s promotion from Ozamiz to Bacolod despite knowing he was on the drug list.

    The 357 cops on Duterte?s drug list will be undergoing ?adjudication? ? their process of double-checking whether the cops deserved to be listed in the first place. The final decision whether a cop will be kept or removed from the list will fall on the table of Duterte. ? Rappler.com





    Now a police chief in Visayas, Philippines who has been known to order acts of police brutality in the country has been called out for being on the Drug registry lists.

    Yes Police Corruption is an issue here and the chief is a hypocrite!!!

    MANILA, Philippines ? Lt. Col. Jovie Espenido, considered among President Rodrigo Duterte?s top enforcers in his drug war, suspects politicians to be behind his inclusion in the narcolist.

    In a phone interview Monday night with the Inquirer, Espenido said: ?Why is the PNP [Philippine National Police] treating me this way??

    He was apparently frustrated as he joined 355 other policemen set for validation by the national adjudication board in Camp Crame.

    He pointed out that, seeing himself as a public servant, he had enforced the campaign against illegal drugs as ordered and undertaken it to the best of his abilities.

    Finding himself in the narcolist was a shock to him and having to undergo another adjudication process, excruciating.

    He pointed out that he sought the exclusion of his name from the narcolist in 2017, petitioning the PNP Directorate for Intelligence for the removal. He said there was already a resolution then.


    According to Espenido, he felt hurt that the higher ranking police officers he toiled for in the war on drugs still doubted his character, proof of which is his name still being in the narcolist.

    He did not discount the possibility that politicians ? he did not say whether local or national ? could have influenced the retention of his name on the narcolist.

    Espenido maintained that he had never gotten involved in the narcotics trade, saying: ?As a policeman I have always fought illegal drugs, moreso now that President Duterte declared war against it. Why would I now get involved in illegal drugs??

    /atm



    Read more: https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/122997...#ixzz6UV6UNIYS
    Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

  10. #1935
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    https://www.kron4.com/news/californi...deo-to-others/

    A 27-year-old Los Angeles police officer accused of fondling a dead woman was sued Tuesday by her family, court documents show.

    The lawsuit accuses officer David Rojas of fondling 34-year-old Elizabeth Baggett’s breasts and “feeling her nipples, without limitation,” as well as showing the body camera video of it to others. The lawsuit alleges invasion of privacy, intentional infliction of emotional distress, negligence, mishandling of human remains and other offenses.

    Baggett’s family filed the lawsuit against the city, Rojas and others, seeking unspecified damages in a jury trial.

    “I just want justice for my daughter because of this horrible disgusting act,” Baggett’s mother, Janet Bagget, said. “I live in fear that the video will surface and another devastation will be added to what is already unbearable.”

    The family’s attorney, Gloria Allred, read a statement from Baggett’s 15-year-old son during a news conference Tuesday announcing the lawsuit.

    “My trust in the police to do the right thing has been violated by this disgraceful act that was my mother,” the statement said.

    Rojas, who has been on the Los Angeles police force for four years, has been suspended, LAPD spokesman Officer Mike Chan said. The department did not have a comment on the lawsuit, which does not name the agency as a defendant.

    Rojas, 27, allegedly touched Baggett’s breast while he was alone in the room with her body on Oct. 20. He and his partner had responded to the downtown Los Angeles home where she died.

    Rojas had allegedly disabled his LAPD body camera, but the act was caught on video when he turned it back on because the devices have two-minute buffering periods to capture what happens right before they are activated, according to a person briefed on the incident who previously spoke to The Associated Press. The person wasn’t authorized to publicly discuss the case and previously spoke to AP on condition of anonymity.

    Driver crashes stolen car into light pole during pursuit in California
    Rojas was charged in January with having sexual contact with human remains without authority. He has pleaded not guilty and faces up to three years in state prison if convicted. He is out on bond and scheduled to return to court Sept. 15, online records show.

    The Los Angeles Police Protective League, the union that represents rank-and-file officers, has declined to pay for Rojas’ legal bills. The officer’s attorney could not immediately be reached for comment Tuesday.
    A Los Angeles (City) Police Officer is accused of groping a dead woman.

  11. #1936
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    https://ktla.com/news/priest-files-l...uring-protest/

    Los Angeles Police Department is accused of Brutality on a priest

    A 55-year-old Armenian priest has alleged in a lawsuit that a Los Angeles police officer struck him in the stomach with the end of a tactical gun and then violently kicked him in the chest as he sought to regain his balance at a recent protest.

    Father Armen Bagramyan, a priest in the Armenian Apostolic Church, claims the officer’s actions during a demonstration outside the Azerbaijani Consulate in Brentwood in July represented excessive force and violated his civil rights, sending him to UCLA Medical Center in an ambulance.

    He also says they came despite the fact that Bagramyan had been helping police maintain order throughout the day.

    “On numerous occasions, Father Bagramyan positioned himself between protesters and law enforcement and would speak to protesters via megaphone, instructing them to comply with the officers’ commands,” the lawsuit says.

  12. #1937
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    https://www.wsmv.com/news/thp-termin...8a9256257.html

    NASHVILLE, TN (WSMV) - A trooper with the Tennessee Highway Patrol's Capitol Protection Unit has been terminated after pulling a mask off a protester.

    THP says Trooper Harvey Briggs, a 22-year veteran of the department, was terminated for unprofessional conduct. Trooper Briggs was placed on discretionary leave with pay on Wednesday, Aug. 12 after the department opened up an investigation Tuesday, Aug. 11.

    Video shows Trooper Briggs shouting at someone documenting a traffic stop and the two began to get into an argument.

    Moments later, you see the mask belonging to the man behind the camera on the ground; he claims Trooper Briggs ripped it off.

  13. #1938
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    https://www.vice.com/en_uk/article/4...uring-suspects

    For the first time in Italian history, the public prosecutor has seized an entire police department in Piacenza, in the northern Italian Lombardy region. More specifically, the officers are part of the Carabinieri, a branch of the Italian army that carries out domestic policing duties. Ten Carabinieri stand accused of crimes including drug dealing, extortion, handling stolen goods, abuse of office, illegal arrest, coercion and even torture. The crimes were committed over the course of three years, but prosecutors say the activities picked up during lockdown.

    Operation Odysseus, coordinated by public prosecutor Grazia Prandella, is investigating a total of 22 people. Five Carabinieri are currently in jail, while their chief is under house arrest and four others are under restricted movement awaiting trial. Only one officer at that department has not been implicated in the investigation.

    According to the public prosecutor, the Carabinieri department had control over drug supplying and stockpiling and they also coordinated with local dealers. Sometimes they sold drugs they had previously confiscated. “Man, you have to get rid of it as soon as possible,” said a Carabiniere in a wiretapped conversation. “I found a kilo and a half on him, I confiscated the rest and kept the good stuff. I struck gold.”

    During the investigation, the department was bugged. The wiretapped conversations paint a picture that can only be compared to some sort of Italian remake of The Shield. “You and I are on top, OK?” said one of the officers, describing the pyramid-shaped hierarchy of the operation. “We’re untouchable, OK?”

    The investigation also uncovered a series of brutal beatings of foreigners and alleged dealers inside of the precinct. In March, they arrested a drug dealer from Nigeria and beat him to a pulp, leaving behind a pool of blood on the ground. “When I saw the blood,” a Carabiniere said, “I thought we killed him.”

    In another case, the recording device picked up audio of the beating of an Egyptian man. The man kept repeating he didn’t have drugs on him, but with each sentence, he got a punch. “Look at how much of our time you’re wasting,” said one of the officers. The Egyptian man pleaded for mercy, sobbed and emitted sounds that, according to the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera, “could be caused by a technique similar to waterboarding.” This is the audio that the investigative judge assigned to the case used to indict the officers of torture.
    News

    The documents also show the Carabinieri helped out their trusted dealers on multiple occasions. One of the officers went to a car dealership in Treviso, about 300 kilometres northeast of Piacenza, to intimidate employees into selling him an Audi A4 destined to an accomplice for a bargain price. Armed with weapons, the man beat up and threatened the employees to the point that one “peed on himself” out of fear. In a wiretapped conversation, another Carabiniere under investigation said: “you know Gomorra? [an Italian book, film and crime series about the mafia in Naples] It was exactly the same. You should have seen how he slapped them.”

    Particularly suspicious was also the lifestyle the officers led, which was simply disproportionate to their salaries. One of them owned a villa with a swimming pool where he threw parties during lockdown, in total disregard of the restrictive measures adopted by the government.

    On Easter Sunday, for instance, one of his neighbours called 112 [the European emergency number] to report a gathering in his garden. When the Carabinieri arrived, they realised it was their colleague’s home and left. The 112 operator later forwarded the call to the Carabiniere who owned the villa, who said he “wanted to hear the voice to know if it was my neighbour, just out of curiosity.”

    “All of the most serious crimes were committed under lockdown,” said the Public Prosecutor Prandella. During one of the toughest periods of the first wave, a Carabiniere “signed a permit allowing the dealer to go to Lombardy [the hardest-hit region by the pandemic] to get drugs,” she explained. Meanwhile, ordinary Italians were under very restrictive lockdown measures and many received fines for going on walks too far from their homes. “I have a hard time calling these people ‘carabinieri’ because their behaviour is purely criminal,” Prosecutor Prandella added.

    Politicians were quick to condemn the department, but did not call into question the integrity of the Carabinieri as a whole. The head of the far-right Lega party, Matteo Salvini, said it was a “potential mistake made by a few” but not “an excuse to defile the reputation of all women and men in uniform.”

    Italy, however, has a long history of police departments abusing their power. In 2009, a 31-year-old man from Rome with a history of drug use was beaten to death in jail in a harrowing case of police brutality that shocked the country. Two were eventually convicted of involuntary manslaughter in 2019. Also in Rome, in 2013, four policemen were arrested for buying and selling drugs together with a gang of drug dealers. In 2017, 27 Carabinieri from the Toscana region were investigated and indicted for a total of 130 charges describing “systematic and methodic” abuses against Italian and foreign citizens, often racially-motivated.

    In another famous 2017 case, two Carabinieri from Florence were accused and later convicted of raping two American students. Another 2015 investigation found that three Carabinieri from Rome stole confiscated drugs and sold them to dealers. In 2011, two Carabinieri from Rome were stopped while selling cocaine. That same year, another department near Padova, in northern Italy, was found to habitually throw “pestering” migrants into a river to “refresh their ideas.” One of them died.

    Even though Piacenza’s case is extreme, it is not isolated.

  14. #1939
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    https://www.vice.com/en_uk/article/4...uring-suspects

    For the first time in Italian history, the public prosecutor has seized an entire police department in Piacenza, in the northern Italian Lombardy region. More specifically, the officers are part of the Carabinieri, a branch of the Italian army that carries out domestic policing duties. Ten Carabinieri stand accused of crimes including drug dealing, extortion, handling stolen goods, abuse of office, illegal arrest, coercion and even torture. The crimes were committed over the course of three years, but prosecutors say the activities picked up during lockdown.

    Operation Odysseus, coordinated by public prosecutor Grazia Prandella, is investigating a total of 22 people. Five Carabinieri are currently in jail, while their chief is under house arrest and four others are under restricted movement awaiting trial. Only one officer at that department has not been implicated in the investigation.

    According to the public prosecutor, the Carabinieri department had control over drug supplying and stockpiling and they also coordinated with local dealers. Sometimes they sold drugs they had previously confiscated. ?Man, you have to get rid of it as soon as possible,? said a Carabiniere in a wiretapped conversation. ?I found a kilo and a half on him, I confiscated the rest and kept the good stuff. I struck gold.?

    During the investigation, the department was bugged. The wiretapped conversations paint a picture that can only be compared to some sort of Italian remake of The Shield. ?You and I are on top, OK?? said one of the officers, describing the pyramid-shaped hierarchy of the operation. ?We?re untouchable, OK??

    The investigation also uncovered a series of brutal beatings of foreigners and alleged dealers inside of the precinct. In March, they arrested a drug dealer from Nigeria and beat him to a pulp, leaving behind a pool of blood on the ground. ?When I saw the blood,? a Carabiniere said, ?I thought we killed him.?

    In another case, the recording device picked up audio of the beating of an Egyptian man. The man kept repeating he didn?t have drugs on him, but with each sentence, he got a punch. ?Look at how much of our time you?re wasting,? said one of the officers. The Egyptian man pleaded for mercy, sobbed and emitted sounds that, according to the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera, ?could be caused by a technique similar to waterboarding.? This is the audio that the investigative judge assigned to the case used to indict the officers of torture.
    News

    The documents also show the Carabinieri helped out their trusted dealers on multiple occasions. One of the officers went to a car dealership in Treviso, about 300 kilometres northeast of Piacenza, to intimidate employees into selling him an Audi A4 destined to an accomplice for a bargain price. Armed with weapons, the man beat up and threatened the employees to the point that one ?peed on himself? out of fear. In a wiretapped conversation, another Carabiniere under investigation said: ?you know Gomorra? [an Italian book, film and crime series about the mafia in Naples] It was exactly the same. You should have seen how he slapped them.?

    Particularly suspicious was also the lifestyle the officers led, which was simply disproportionate to their salaries. One of them owned a villa with a swimming pool where he threw parties during lockdown, in total disregard of the restrictive measures adopted by the government.

    On Easter Sunday, for instance, one of his neighbours called 112 [the European emergency number] to report a gathering in his garden. When the Carabinieri arrived, they realised it was their colleague?s home and left. The 112 operator later forwarded the call to the Carabiniere who owned the villa, who said he ?wanted to hear the voice to know if it was my neighbour, just out of curiosity.?

    ?All of the most serious crimes were committed under lockdown,? said the Public Prosecutor Prandella. During one of the toughest periods of the first wave, a Carabiniere ?signed a permit allowing the dealer to go to Lombardy [the hardest-hit region by the pandemic] to get drugs,? she explained. Meanwhile, ordinary Italians were under very restrictive lockdown measures and many received fines for going on walks too far from their homes. ?I have a hard time calling these people ?carabinieri? because their behaviour is purely criminal,? Prosecutor Prandella added.

    Politicians were quick to condemn the department, but did not call into question the integrity of the Carabinieri as a whole. The head of the far-right Lega party, Matteo Salvini, said it was a ?potential mistake made by a few? but not ?an excuse to defile the reputation of all women and men in uniform.?

    Italy, however, has a long history of police departments abusing their power. In 2009, a 31-year-old man from Rome with a history of drug use was beaten to death in jail in a harrowing case of police brutality that shocked the country. Two were eventually convicted of involuntary manslaughter in 2019. Also in Rome, in 2013, four policemen were arrested for buying and selling drugs together with a gang of drug dealers. In 2017, 27 Carabinieri from the Toscana region were investigated and indicted for a total of 130 charges describing ?systematic and methodic? abuses against Italian and foreign citizens, often racially-motivated.

    In another famous 2017 case, two Carabinieri from Florence were accused and later convicted of raping two American students. Another 2015 investigation found that three Carabinieri from Rome stole confiscated drugs and sold them to dealers. In 2011, two Carabinieri from Rome were stopped while selling cocaine. That same year, another department near Padova, in northern Italy, was found to habitually throw ?pestering? migrants into a river to ?refresh their ideas.? One of them died.

    Even though Piacenza?s case is extreme, it is not isolated.

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    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/2-l...t-allegations/


    Two Los Angeles County sheriff’s captains are on administrative leave following allegations of sexual misconduct, officials and public safety sources said.

    Capt. Marc Lucio, who serves on the Chino City Council, was accused in July of sexual assault involving a child, but prosecutors said there was insufficient evidence to file charges, according to the San Bernardino County district attorney’s office.

    Capt. Donald Rubio’s case has been under review by prosecutors since January, the L.A. County district attorney’s office said. Two public safety sources say he was accused of rape by intoxication. The sources requested anonymity to discuss the case candidly.

    Neither captain responded to a request for comment.

  16. #1941
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    https://www.q13fox.com/news/oversigh...rotest-conduct

    SEATTLE - The Office of Police Accountability on Friday announced 53 new investigations into the Seattle Police Department?s conduct during recent demonstrations.

    The oversight agency has received about 19,000 complaints since protests started in the city at the end of May, sparked by the police killing of George Floyd in Minnesota. The complaints have resulted in 87 active investigations.

    The video of a screaming child being treated after getting pepper spray on his face at a demonstration on May 30 prompted about 14,000 of the complaints from the public, according to OPA Director Andrew Myerberg.

    Myerberg had initially set an ambitious goal of resolving this case in 60 days. That self-imposed deadline has come and gone.

    ?I think we were shooting for the stars, but I just think it was unrealistic and that?s just the reality,? Myerberg said.

    The reality is the flow of complaints kept coming in with continued protests and clashes with police. The next big surge in cases came with demonstrations the last weekend in July. Most of the complaints accuse police officers of using excessive force.

    ?One of the tricky parts about these protests is that we?re being hit all at the same time with very fact-intensive, video-intensive cases,? Myerberg said.

    Among the new investigations include instances of police force against legal observers, journalists and medical professionals.
    Most videos that are posted on Twitter that become viral, someone is sending those to us and even if they didn?t, we would likely open up a case,? Myerberg said.

    He said when they open up a case, they look at video and underlying evidence in addition to conducting interviews with the subjects of the force, the officers involved, and witnesses from the community and the force.

    After completing an investigation report, OPA submits it for a review by the Office of Inspector General, which is where the case involving the pepper-sprayed child is currently, according to Myerberg.

    Once OIG returns the report, Myerberg reviews the input and drafts the final conclusion before releasing it to the public. OPA has 180 days to complete an investigation, but the office is pressing to complete them sooner.

    ?I think you?re going to have people on all sides that will probably disagree with my findings and that?s just the nature of the job,? Myerberg said.

    In speaking of the 87 open investigations related to demonstrations, he said with certainty that some cases will result in officer discipline while others will not, noting that what is seen by the public in a 20-second Twitter video is not the entirety of the evidence.

    OPA typically receives about 1,500 complaints a year, according to Myerberg, compared with the 19,000 they?ve received in the past three months related to demonstrations. The intense public interest around these investigations prompted OPA to create a dashboard so the public can follow the progress.

    Myerberg said he expects to release findings from some of the cases in the next month.

  17. #1942
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    https://fox40.com/news/california-co...ice-shootings/

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The California Senate voted Sunday to require the state’s top prosecutor to investigate all police shootings that kill an unarmed civilian, advancing one of the highest profile reforms introduced this year in response to the killing of George Floyd.

    The Senate OK’d the bill despite opposition from Attorney General Xavier Becerra, who has called a previous version of the bill “untenable and unreasonable” because it would cost his office up to $80 million a year. But the legislation easily got enough votes to pass the Senate with bipartisan support and will soon head toward a final vote in the state Assembly.

    “I can assure you if white Americans were being killed at the same rate as African Americans and Latinos are being killed, not only in this state but across this country, you would be calling for the disbandment of police departments all across this state,” said Sen. Steven Bradford, a Democrat from Gardena. “Because it is black and brown people, people that you have never ever truly valued their lives in this country, it’s like, ‘Oh, they must have deserved it.’”

    Becerra opposed an earlier version of the bill, which would have given local law enforcement agencies discretion to ask for an investigation. Becerra’s office has said it is still reviewing the latest amendments.

    Assemblyman Kevin McCarty, a Democrat from Sacramento, has tried for years to get the bill passed but has been unable to overcome objections from the Attorney General’s Office. This year, Floyd’s killing in police custody has prompted a worldwide movement that has also pushed reforms to the forefront in state Legislatures.

    That momentum also led the Senate on Sunday to approve legislation that would ban police officers from using choke holds and carotid holds. A choke hold applies pressure to a person’s windpipe while a carotid hold applies pressure to a person’s carotid artery, which slows the flow of blood to the brain.

    Most law enforcement agencies in California have already banned choke holds after state and federal courts have found departments that use them are liable for damages in cases of death or serious injury. But the carotid hold is more common.

    Floyd died after a police officer put his knee on Floyd’s neck. It wasn’t a carotid hold, but the incident — which was filmed and quickly spread on social media — prompted police departments to rethink their use of dangerous neck holds. Police departments in Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego banned the use of carotid holds.

    Newsom also ordered the Commission on Police Officer Standards to stop teaching officers how to use the hold.

    Some Republicans have declined to support similar bills and many of them abstained from voting on Sunday. Sen. Jim Nielsen, a Republican from Red Bluff, voted against the bill requiring independent investigations of police shootings, calling it “another overreaction.”

    “This is really headed towards open season on law enforcement professionals who sacrifice their lives every day for us,” Nielsen said.

    Sen. Holly Mitchell, a Democrat from Los Angeles, scoffed at those comments, calling the legislation an “appropriate level of accountability.”

    “How, pray tell, is that disrespecting and not honoring law enforcement?” Mitchell said.

    The bill also faces objections from police reform groups that say it doesn’t go far enough to create an independent investigator. They believe the attorney general’s office is too tied to law enforcement.

    The legislation sets up an odd battle between Democratic lawmakers who control the Legislature and the state’s top law enforcement officer, also a progressive Democrat.

    “If he wanted to, he could prioritize independent investigations for police deadly force,” said Assemblyman Kevin McCarty of Sacramento. “He could join five other states, embrace this common sense reform and be on the right side of history.”

    Becerra has said his office has often intervened to investigate killings by police, including the 2018 fatal shooting of vandalism suspect Stephon Clark in Sacramento. His office currently is investigating allegations police in Vallejo in the San Francisco Bay Area acted improperly when they killed Sean Monterrosa while responding to a looting call during recent protests, then destroyed key evidence.

    Clark was found with only a cellphone; Monterrosa with only a hammer.

    McCarty’s bill would make those investigations mandatory by a department that already lacks sufficient resources, Becerra said in a letter of opposition even before the bill was amended.

    “We are not equipped or resourced to take on this work on a routine basis,” Becerra said. “Our small team of investigators and prosecutors have not a fraction of the capacity possessed by our local partners.”

  18. #1943
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    https://fox5sandiego.com/news/califo...-problem-cops/

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Police unions and other law enforcement organizations went into overdrive to thwart a measure that would have added California to the majority of states that can end the careers of officers with troubled histories.

    It failed as lawmakers scrambled to wrap up their work, and while the nation’s most populous state still has no way to permanently remove problematic officers, a number of other police reforms passed.

    With lobbyists and lawmakers mostly isolated by the coronavirus pandemic, it became a battle of phone calls, colorful graphics and Instagram posts from law enforcement organizations to counter celebrity tweets pushing lawmakers to rein in police brutality after the death of George Floyd last May in Minneapolis and the shooting of Jacob Blake last week in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

    “We ended up, for lack of a better term, playing a game of whack-a-mole,” Tom Saggau, a spokesman for police unions in Los Angeles and San Francisco, said of law enforcement efforts to counter support for what he called a deeply flawed proposal.

    Even intervention from Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom wasn’t enough to rescue the measure that died without a vote before the legislative session ended early Tuesday. It failed hours after Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputies fatally shot Dijon Kizzee after the Black man dropped a a bundle that included a gun.

    The legislation would have created a way to permanently strip badges from officers who commit serious misconduct. Law enforcement groups successfully argued that the proposed system would be biased and lack basic due process protections.

    Proposals to reveal more police misconduct records, require officers to intervene if they witness excessive use of force, and limit their use of rubber bullets and tear gas against peaceful protesters also died without final votes.

    Lawmakers, however, sent Newsom measures to ban choke holds and other neck restraints, require the state attorney general to investigate fatal police shootings of unarmed civilians, and increase oversight of county sheriffs, among other changes.

    “To ignore the thousands of voices calling for meaningful police reform is insulting,” Democratic Sen. Steven Bradford, who is Black, said after his legislation on removing officers failed. “Today, Californians were once again let down by those who were meant to represent them.”

    Five states have no way of decertifying police officers who commit misconduct — California, Hawaii, New Jersey, Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

    Removing California from that list was a top priority of the California Legislative Black Caucus and had support from hundreds of entertainers, including Rihanna, Mariah Carey and Robert De Niro. Kim Kardashian West caused a stir with a late tweet backing the measure Monday.

    Law enforcement organizations and unions insist they also want a way to permanently remove troubled officers so they can’t simply move from one department to another.

    The California Police Chiefs Association and a separate coalition of eight Black police chiefs in June called for stripping officers’ training certifications following due process proceedings if they break the law or have a history of egregious misconduct.

    s a top priority of the California Legislative Black Caucus and had support from hundreds of entertainers, including Rihanna, Mariah Carey and Robert De Niro. Kim Kardashian West caused a stir with a late tweet backing the measure Monday.

    Law enforcement organizations and unions insist they also want a way to permanently remove troubled officers so they can’t simply move from one department to another.

    The California Police Chiefs Association and a separate coalition of eight Black police chiefs in June called for stripping officers’ training certifications following due process proceedings if they break the law or have a history of egregious misconduct.

    RELATED CONTENT
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    The Los Angeles Police Protective League and San Francisco Police Officers Association, which together represent 12,000 officers, on Tuesday reiterated their willingness to negotiate “a fair, reasonable and workable decertification process.”

    Their main complaint with Bradford’s bill was the makeup of a proposed nine-member disciplinary panel to consider if officers’ conduct is enough to end their careers. Six of the nine members would be required to have backgrounds opposing police misconduct, while the remaining three would represent law enforcement.

    The opponents said that would make the board inherently biased against officers, while Bradford said the mix was needed to restore community trust in police and the disciplinary process.

    Law enforcement organizations offered alternative wording, and Newsom’s office weighed in with proposed amendments that Saggau, the police union spokesman, said “would have made it more palatable, more reasonable.”

    Bradford rejected those but accepted 40 other changes by Saggau’s count.

    “Rejecting some compromise language from the governor, but accepting 40 amendments that drove a wedge further with law enforcement, we think that’s what derailed the measure,” he said.

    Bradford declined an interview request Tuesday, but Saggau and Brian Marvel, president of the rank-and-file Peace Officers Research Association of California, said Bradford hurt his bill’s chances by refusing to talk with law enforcement officials.

    “When you’re changing a profession, and you don’t talk to the people it’s actually affecting, I think good leaders stand up and say that’s probably not a fair process,” Marvel said.

    The lobbying was so intense that Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon set up a special voicemail on his office phone to field comments.

    “l think there were a lot of concerns, even with some of our allies,” said Rendon, who supported the legislation.

    He said lawmakers have bucked the police lobby in the past, but the measure also ran into opposition from organized labor.

    Bradford said he intends to try again next year, and Senate President Pro Tempore Toni Atkins said more work is to be done on several of the policing measures that failed this year.

    “Clearly some colleagues felt like there needed to be more conversation, more discussion,” she said, adding that “I think it is our job to make sure we keep the momentum and the conversation happening.”

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    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/o-c...recently-died/

    An Orange County sheriff’s deputy suspected of breaking into the Yorba Linda home of a man who died in July is now on paid leave after being arrested, officials said Thursday.

    Orange County Sheriff's Deputy Steve Hortz appears in a booking photo released by the agency on Sept. 10, 2020. He was arrested that day on suspicion of burglarizing a Yorba Linda home.
    Orange County Sheriff’s Deputy Steve Hortz appears in a booking photo released by the agency on Sept. 10, 2020. He was arrested that day on suspicion of burglarizing a Yorba Linda home.
    Surveillance footage captured Deputy Steve Hortz breaking into the home on at least three occasions and leaving with stolen possessions such as weapon safes, ceiling fans and cases of unknown items, according to the O.C. Sheriff’s Department. He was booked into Santa Ana Jail on suspicion of burglary.

    He is currently on paid administrative leave, said Carrie Braun, spokeswoman for the Sheriff’s Department.

    However, she said, the agency is “looking into the possibility” of getting him on unpaid leave.

    Hortz responded to a call for service at the home on July 20, 2020 regarding the death of a man in his 70s, who apparently died from natural causes, officials said.

    On Wednesday, an attorney representing the family estate of the man contacted the Sheriff’s Department about items reported missing from the home, officials said. He gave the department footage showing the deputy breaking in.

    “Yesterday was when the surveillance video was brought to our attention,” Braun said.

    Braun said the department was investigating the alleged thefts after they were first reported about a week earlier. But the allegations were linked to Deputy Hortz for the first time on Wednesday, she said.

    Hortz, a 12-year veteran of the department, first returned to the residence on July 27, a week after he responded to a call for service about the resident’s death, sheriff’s officials said.

    “While in uniform, he broke into the unoccupied residence through the rear and left a short time later,” Sheriff’s Department said in a news release.

    Officials said it’s not clear if Hortz stole items from the home during that incident.

    However, during the early morning hours of Aug. 10 and Aug. 16, he allegedly returned to the home wearing civilian clothes and walked away with several stolen items, according to sheriff’s officials.

    The department will investigate prior calls handled by Hortz to determine whether similar incidents occurred in the past, officials said.

    “I will do everything we can to make sure he does not return to a uniform in this organization or anywhere else for that matter,” O.C. Sheriff Don Barnes said during a news conference Thursday.

    Barnes said he expects Hortz will be charged and convicted “based on the evidence we have against him.”

    And if he is convicted, Barnes said, “he does not deserve to work in this profession anymore.”

    “He’s embarrassed this profession, he’s embarrassed this organization, and he’s embarrassed the almost 4,000 members who do good work everyday,” Barnes said.

    On Wednesday, the Orange County District Attorney’s Office announced a felony charge against another O.C. sheriff’s deputy suspected of stealing.

    Deputy Angelina Cortez allegedly took a bank card from a theft suspect back in November 2018 and gave it to her son, who then used it, prosecutors said.

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