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Thread: Bad Cops. BAD! BAD!

  1. #1876
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    https://apnews.com/104e29aeba6f4ffe99bd26bc6391d4d4

    SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) — A special prosecutor was requested Monday to investigate the fatal shooting of a black man by a white police officer in a case that has inflamed tensions between black residents and law enforcement in the community and has roiled the Democratic presidential campaign of Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

    St. Joseph County Prosecutor Kenneth Cotter filed a petition asking a judge to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate the June 16 shooting of 54-year-old Eric Logan by South Bend police Sgt. Ryan O’Neill. It comes a day after Buttigieg said he would write the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division and notify Cotter that he’d like an independent investigator appointed.

    Cotter’s petition also revealed that O’Neill had been accused of making “inappropriate racial remarks” as a patrol officer 11 years ago. The South Bend Fraternal Order of Police, which represents local officers including O’Neill, issued a statement Monday saying that it supports O’Neill and accusing Buttigieg of “driving a wedge between law enforcement officers and the community they took an oath to serve.”

    Buttigieg, who has surged from obscurity to become a top-tier 2020 presidential candidate, left the campaign trail for several days to deal with fallout from the June 16 shooting. He faced criticism Sunday from angry residents of South Bend at an emotional town hall meeting, where some community members questioned whether he had done enough to reform the police department in his two terms as mayor. Buttigieg created controversy during his first term when he fired the city’s black police chief.
    Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg faced criticism Sunday from angry residents of South Bend, Indiana, at an emotional town hall meeting a week after a white police officer fatally shot a black man in the city where he is mayor. (June 24)

    The mayor praised the prosecutor’s decision to request an independent investigator.

    “I respect and support Prosecutor Cotter’s decision to seek an outside, special prosecutor to investigate the circumstances of Eric Logan’s death,” Buttigieg said in a statement Monday. “Our community is in anguish, and for all of us to come to terms with what happened, it is vital that the investigation be fair, thorough, and impartial.”

    The shooting occurred after O’Neill responded to a call about a suspicious person going through vehicles, Cotter has said. O’Neill spotted Logan leaning inside a car. When confronted, Logan approached O’Neill with a 6- to 8-inch knife raised over his head, the prosecutor said. O’Neill fired twice, with one shot hitting a car door. The shooting was not recorded by the officer’s body camera.

    Cotter’s petition requests a special prosecutor to “avoid any appearance of impropriety, conflict of interest or influence upon the ultimate prosecutorial decision to be made.”

    The petition also noted his chief investigator, Dave Newton, was a South Bend police lieutenant in 2008 while O’Neill was a patrol officer and had filed a report at the time quoting two other officers “that voiced a concern of inappropriate racial remarks made by Ryan O’Neill.”

    It wasn’t clear whether O’Neill received any department discipline as a result of the report.

  2. #1877
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    https://www.sbsun.com/2019/06/28/san...obref=obinsite

    Like many rookie deputies fresh out of the San Bernardino County sheriff’s training academy, 22-year-old Luke Van Ginkel began his law enforcement career at the West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga.

    But unlike most deputies, Van Ginkel had a sadistic streak during his stint there, according to interviews with more than a half-dozen inmates at West Valley. Not only did Van Ginkel threaten some inmates, they said, but more often he provoked inmates to fight one another in the jail’s protective custody unit.

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    A May 22 criminal complaint filed in San Bernardino Superior Court charges Van Ginkel with criminal threats and assault. Fellow rookie Deputy Arthur Enriquez, who inmates say often went along with and covered up for Van Ginkel’s alleged iniquity, is charged with a felony count of accessory after the fact.

    West Valley inmate Alex Garcia is charged with one felony count of assault likely to produce great bodily injury for an alleged assault on fellow inmate Richard Freeman on Dec. 31, 2018.

    Van Ginkel, Enriquez and Garcia all pleaded not guilty to the charges during their June 17 arraignment. They will next appear in Rancho Cucamonga Superior Court on Aug. 5 for a pretrial hearing.


    West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga. (SCNG)
    ‘Staged multiple fights’
    In interviews, inmates say Van Ginkel instigated more than just Garcia’s alleged New Year’s Eve assault on Freeman.

    “They staged multiple fights,” West Valley inmate John Rodriguez said in an interview at the jail. Rodriguez said he witnessed the alleged assault on Freeman, as well as another inmate assault facilitated by Van Ginkel by inmate Jose Angel Carrillo.

    Carrillo admitted to the assault during a recent interview at the jail, saying he did it out of fear of Van Ginkel and concern for his own safety.

    “I didn’t want to become someone’s bitch,” Carrillo said.


    Culture of abuse?
    The charges against Van Ginkel and Enriquez come five years after allegations of inmate abuse by at least three rookie deputies surfaced in the same unit at the jail, prompting investigations by the Sheriff’s Department and the FBI in March 2014.

    Inmates alleged a pattern of Taser gun torture by rookie Deputies Brock Teyechea, Andrew Cruz and Nicholas Oakley. The three deputies, along with Deputies Robert Escamilla, Russell Kopasz, Robert Morris and Eric Smale, were either fired or resigned from the Sheriff’s Department, authorities said. None of the deputies was criminally charged.

    In March 2018, the Berkeley-based prisoner advocacy nonprofit, Prison Law Office, settled a class-action lawsuit with the county alleging inmate civil rights violations at county jails, including excessive use of force by deputies on inmates and inadequate medical and mental health care.

    Under terms of the settlement, Sheriff John McMahon agreed to, among other things, revise the department’s deputy use-of-force policy and expand inmate health-care services. A federal judge approved the consent decree in December 2018.

    Some allege a culture and pattern of inmate abuse in county jails, especially in West Valley’s protective custody unit, where accused child molesters, gang dropouts and others who face danger from the general population are housed.

    “It’s a complete and total culture of violence handed down from one generation to the next,” said Victorville defense attorney Jim Terrell, who along with attorney Sharon Brunner represented 33 inmate plaintiffs in seven federal civil rights lawsuits stemming from the Taser gun torture allegations. Those cases were settled in July 2017 for a total of $2.75 million.

    “It appears conditions have not improved at San Bernardino County jails,” Brunner said. “I continue to be very concerned and disheartened at the number of inmates who contact me about beatings, denial of medical care and the cruel indifference of (West Valley Detention Center) staff.”

    Since January, Terrell and Brunner say they have received more than 20 complaints from inmates alleging Van Ginkel staged fights or assaulted them at the jail.

    McMahon, as he did in 2014, maintains there is no culture of inmate abuse at West Valley or any other county jail, and that there is nothing to tie the allegations against Van Ginkel and Enriquez to the Taser gun abuse cases of the past.

    “There’s nothing to connect the two. There’s nothing to suggest a pattern,” he said during a recent tour of the jail.

    Van Ginkel’s attorney, Michael Begovich, said his client resigned from the Sheriff’s Department amid the internal affairs and criminal investigations. He declined to comment for this story. The Sheriff’s Department confirmed Van Ginkel was no longer working for the department as of April 1.

    Enriquez is still employed at the department, but remains on paid administrative leave.


    The West Valley Detention Center in Rancho Cucamonga . (Image via Google Maps)
    Inmates allege abuse
    During interviews over the past month, inmates said inmate Freeman was assaulted by Garcia in a hair-cutting room, housed in the “G Room” of the unit, which also has a nurse’s office and upstairs phone bank for inmates to talk to visitors.

    Inmate Rodriguez said he was a chow server preparing meals in the G Room when Van Ginkel brought in a handcuffed Freeman and sat him in the “barber room,” as it is called. Rodriguez said Van Ginkel instructed him to push a food cart in front of the barber room to obstruct the view.

    “You know what time it is,” Rodriguez quoted Van Ginkel as saying.

    He said he complied with Van Ginkel’s orders out of fear of what would happen to him if he didn’t. Rodriguez said Garcia, at Van Ginkel’s urging, went into the room and began punching Freeman. Garcia also is charged in connection with the May 2018 fatal shooting of an Ontario man.

    Freeman filed a claim with the county on Jan. 23 alleging abuse, denial of medical care and cruel and unusual punishment. He signed a settlement agreement with the county on Jan. 31 for $250,000, and agreed to keep details of the incident confidential, according to the claim and settlement agreement.

    Carrillo, who is in custody for attempted murder, said he assaulted an inmate inside his cell on Christmas Eve 2018 after Van Ginkel opened both his and the other inmate’s cell doors. Van Ginkel orchestrated the whole thing, even telling Carrillo to use the excuse of needing a toilet plunger as the reason for leaving his cell, Carrillo said.

    Carrillo said he beat the inmate until he pleaded for him to stop, then returned to his cell, where he said Van Ginkel got on the cell intercom and said, “I hope you enjoyed your Christmas present.”

    Neither Carrillo nor other inmates interviewed for this story could remember the name of the inmate victim, only the cell number and cell block where he was housed in and that he went by the nickname “Smokey.”

    Carrillo is named in the criminal complaint against Van Ginkel, but not as a charged assault suspect like Garcia. Rather, he is considered a victim of criminal threats by Van Ginkel on Dec. 23, 2018.

    Deputy District Attorney Debbie Ploghaus, who is prosecuting Van Ginkel, Enriquez and Garcia, said she did not have enough evidence to support a criminal assault or battery charge against Carrillo that would have held up at trial. She did, however, believe her evidence was solid in proving Van Ginkel threatened Carrillo.

    Ploghaus said she was unaware of allegations by other inmates — including Michael Flores and Darrell Jones — that Van Ginkel assaulted them.

    Other assaults alleged
    Flores alleges he was physically attacked in his cell by Van Ginkel and Enriquez last November after he exchanged words with a female custody specialist. He claims Van Ginkel entered his cell and “sucker punched” him on the right side of his face. He said he fell to the floor and put his hands behind his back to show he wasn’t resisting, when Van Ginkel and Enriquez allegedly kicked and punched him repeatedly.

    Flores said other deputies, sergeants and nurses were aware of the incident but did nothing.

    “Sergeants and deputies all knew about it, and they turned a blind eye,” said Flores, who has since been transferred to the High Desert Detention Center in Adelanto.

    Flores said he filed a grievance about the incident, but could not remember the findings from the investigation, only that they were not in his favor.

    Jones, who is in custody for the the January 2016 beating death of his mother, Barbara Crumity, said Van Ginkel in December cuffed one of his hands through the food tray slot of his cell door, then pepper sprayed his cell with the other hand. Jones said Van Ginkel firmly held him in place for a minute or two as he inhaled the caustic chemicals.

  3. #1878
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    Former Florida officer allegedly planted drugs during traffic stops, 'tailored' body cam video
    https://www.yahoo.com/news/former-fl...180952213.html

    ALLAHASSEE, Fla. — A former Florida deputy was arrested Wednesday morning on numerous charges that he planted street drugs like meth on unsuspecting motorists before hauling them off to jail.

    Zach Wester, 26, was arrested on felony charges of racketeering, official misconduct, fabricating evidence, possession of a controlled substance and false imprisonment.

    The one-time Jackson County deputy faces misdemeanor charges of perjury, possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement said.

    He was arrested by FDLE agents and taken to the Wakulla County Jail, where he is being held without bail.

  4. #1879
    Senior Member Nic B's Avatar
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    I anticipate a lot of lawsuits!


    Quote Originally Posted by marakisses View Post
    yes i said i will leave it under you storage he said cuddle with me i said shut up it over??? what am i doing wrong??

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    https://ktla.com/2019/07/19/l-a-coun...ui-conviction/

    When Alex Villanueva appeared onstage in December to be sworn in as Los Angeles County sheriff, his son was standing nearby cheering him on.

    Now, 33-year-old Johannes Jared Villanueva is working for the department as a deputy sheriff trainee, on track to graduate from the academy in November.

    The son, an Army veteran, was hired in June despite a record that department watchdogs said would generate scrutiny. It comes as the sheriff is facing questions about other hiring decisions.

    In 2009 and 2010, he was the subject of two bench warrants for failing to comply with a court-ordered treatment program tied to his 2009 conviction of a misdemeanor DUI in San Diego County, resulting in an extension of his probation until 2015, according to court files.

  6. #1881
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    http://www.ktvu.com/news/ktvu-local-...ice-department


    PALO ALTO, Calif. (KTVU) - Palo Alto Police Department is defending itself against charges several officers violated a suspect’s civil rights. Attorneys for Gustavo Alvarez say the officers in question filed false police reports and did not reveal the use-of-force during his arrest.

    The charges in the criminal case last year were dropped against Alvarez because the Santa Clara County Superior Court judge ruled Palo Alto police did not have reasonable suspicion to stop and arrest him for a traffic violation.

    Alvarez’ lawyer has now filed charges against the department in federal court, saying police violated his client’s 4th Amendment rights against illegal search and seizures.

    It’s aimed at deterring this type of unlawful behavior, this dishonest behavior by the police,” said attorney Cody Salfen, who is representing Alvarez.
    \
    Salfen laid out hundreds of pages of evidence he says prove four Palo Alto police officers are unfit to wear a badge. His case centers on home surveillance video from the rough arrest of Gustavo Alvarez in February 2018.

    Officer Chris Conde initially tried to conduct a traffic stop because – according to the police report – the subject was known to have a suspended driver’s license. According to Conde’s report the, “suspect was seen driving in the roadway.” But in the audio from the surveillance video, Conde can be heard responding to Alvarez’ repeated question “did you see me driving,” by saying, “I didn’t.”

    In the video, Alvarez makes a hand gesture and goes back into his mobile home. Conde leaves for a few minutes and calls in back up. Now several patrol shift officers return, demanding Alvarez surrender. Sgt. Wayne Benitez eventually kicks in the door, grabs the suspect and – with help – throws him to the hood of a car.

    Benitez said in his report, officers moved to make an arrest, “since officers had two on-view charges against him [Alvarez], driving on a suspended license and now resisting officers.” The report goes on to say, “…Agent DeStafano and I put Alvarez on the hood of his car where he was handcuffed. No other force was used on Alvarez.” But the surveillance video shows officers punching Alvarez and slamming him face-first into the car’s windshield.

    “I’m bleeding,” Alvarez told officers as they pull him toward a patrol vehicle. “You’re gonna be bleeding a whole lot more,” Sgt. Benitez responded.

    “Not a single one of those officers reported the incident properly. Not a single one of those officers adhered to the written policy in terms of informing their superiors about the use-of-force. The use of force. The violence. The unlawful acts by Sgt. Benitez were specifically from Benitez’ report. They were omitted from Officer Conde’s report,” said Salfen.

    Salfen’s civil rights lawsuit against the Palo Alto Police Department claims officers deprived Alvarez of his 4th Amendment right against unlawful search and seizure. Palo Alto police referred us to the city manager for comment, who issued a statement that reads in part, “The police department has procedures to investigate allegations of misconduct thoroughly and to hold officers accountable if misconduct is determined to have occurred.”

    According to police officials, only Sgt. Benitez is on administrative duty. The others are working their normal shifts.

    “These officers have no business being peace officers. They are dishonest. They are violent. They have a veil of secrecy that they’ve created,” said Salfen.

    This incident involves only a handful of Palo Alto police officers, and is not an indictment of the entire department. The federal civil rights case is still on going and could take months to either go to trial or reach a settlement.

  7. #1882
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    https://www.lohud.com/story/news/cri...se/1825651001/

    Nicholas Tartaglione a former Cop under investigation for murder is now under investigation over Jefferey Epstein.

    Nicholas Tartaglione made headlines in 2016 when the former Briarcliff Manor police officer was charged with killing four men in Orange County.

    There have been various developments in his story as his case lingers, including this week, when WNBC reported that Tartaglione was questioned about jail-cell injuries found on financier and accused child sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein.

    Here's a timeline of events in Tartaglione's case and federal custody.

    Dec. 19, 2016: Tartaglione, then 49, was arrested and accused of killing Martin Luna, Urbano Santiago, Miguel Luna, and Hector Gutierrez in and around the Likquid Lounge, a bar his brother operated in Chester. He was also charged with conspiracy to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine, and federal prosecutors said the killings were part of that drug conspiracy.

    Tartaglione pleaded not guilty to the charges, which were filed in a five-count superseding indictment. The original indictment was sealed. The charges referred to co-conspirators, but did not identify other people allegedly involved.

    Dec. 20, 2016: The bodies of those four men were found on property that Tartaglione had rented in Otisville in Orange County. The four men had been missing since April 11, 2016.


    March 8, 2017: Gerard Benderoth fatally shot himself when FBI agents pulled him over while driving in Haverstraw. Questions swirled about a possible tie between Benderoth — a 48-year-old power weightlifter, Stony Point resident, retired Haverstraw police officer, and father of four — and Tartaglione.

    Tartaglione's lawyer, Bruce Barket, said at the time that Benderoth had surfaced in the case, but it's unclear in what capacity.

    June 1, 2017: Joseph Biggs, a Nanuet resident and security guard for the Greenburgh-Graham school district in Hastings-on-Hudson, was arrested in the case. He and Tartaglione were charged in a 17-count superseding indictment, which added firearms and kidnapping charges to the murder and drug conspiracy charges.

    Joseph Biggs, of Nanuet, is charged along with ex-Briarcliff
    Joseph Biggs, of Nanuet, is charged along with ex-Briarcliff Manor cop Nicholas Tartaglione in the April 2016 deaths of four men in Orange County (Photo: Submitted)

    September 19, 2017: A brief appearance in White Plains federal court revealed that prosecutors believed Tartaglione was not present when three of the men were killed in April 2016. Prosecutors had said that Tartaglione and Biggs are believed to have lured Martin Luna to Likquid Lounge because he owed money from a drug operation, and that Luna brought the other three men, who were not involved in the narcotics ring.
    If Tartaglione Beat Up Jefferey Epstein then pardon him!! He deserves to be pardoned.

  8. #1883
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    https://www.lohud.com/story/news/cri...es/1824385001/

    Speculation that accused child sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein may have been assaulted in his Manhattan jail cell by a former Briarcliff Manor police officer awaiting trial in a quadruple homicide is false, the lawyer for ex-cop Nicholas Tartaglione said Thursday afternoon.

    "Any suggestion that Mr. Tartaglione assaulted anyone is a complete fabrication," the lawyer, Bruce Barket, said in a statement. "This story is being leaked to retaliate against Mr. Tartaglione for complaining to the court about the deplorable conditions at the MCC. We made those complaints on Monday in open court. We warned the judge that officials at the jail would retaliate against Nick because we have been exposing the inhumane conditions at the facility.”

    Epstein, a wealthy financier, has been held at the federal Metropolitan Correctional Center since his arrest July 6. He was found this week in his cell, lying in a fetal position, semi-conscious, with marks on his neck, wnbcnewyork.com reported Wednesday night.

    Investigators are looking into the possibility that Epstein might have tried to hang himself, or that it might have been a ruse to try to get transferred, according to NBC, which also reported Epstein is on suicide watch.

    Nick Tartaglione, a former Briarcliff Manor police
    Nick Tartaglione, a former Briarcliff Manor police officer, was arrested on Dec. 19, 2016, and charged in a quadruple homicide in Orange County. (Photo: Courtesy of Nick Tartaglione)

    Investigators talked to Tartaglione, who is the same unit at MCC, as they also look into the possibility that Epstein might have been assaulted, NBC reported.

    Epstein, 66, was treated and, according to the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, remains in custody at MCC. Jail records obtained by The Associated Press show no indication he was taken to a hospital.

    In a statement, the bureau gave no other details and would not comment on Epstein’s condition. An Epstein lawyer had no immediate response.


    Epstein has been accused of sexually abusing dozens of underage girls in the early 2000s. He was indicted on federal charges in New York this month more than a decade after he secretly struck a deal with federal prosecutors in Florida to dispose of similar charges of large-scale sex trafficking. He pleaded guilty in 2008 to soliciting a minor for prostitution and served 13 months behind bars.


    A judge denied him bail last week, ruling that he might flee the country if released. The judge also said Epstein is a danger to the public because of his “uncontrollable” urges to engage in sexual conduct with underage girls.

    Barket told NBC that Tartaglione and Epstein get along well. He said the two men have been complaining about rodents, flooding, and food in the jail.

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    Tartaglione has been complaining about the conditions for more than two years. It got so bad this year that U.S. District Judge Kenneth Karas intervened and requested updates from officials at the prison about efforts to make improvements. Last month, the situation seemed to have improved, Barket said, but he told Karas Monday that the situation had worsened.

    Tartaglione made headlines recently after correction officers confiscated an illicit cell phone that was found in his cell on July 3, according to court records. He claimed his cellmate had tossed it to him as correction officers approached the cell, prosecutors said.

    Tartaglione was assaulted at MCC in 2018, when he was hospitalized for two weeks for surgery to repair a fractured eye socket bone, Barket said at the time.

    Jeffrey Epstein
    A 2006 photo provided by the Palm Beach (Fla.) Sheriff's Office shows Jeffrey Epstein. (Photo: Palm Beach (Fla.) Sheriff's Office)

    Tartaglione is facing the death penalty in the killing in the killing of four men — Martin Luna, Miguel Luna, Urbano Santiago, and Hector Gutierrez — who were found buried in December 2016 on property that Tartaglione had previously rented in Otisville, in Orange County.

    The four men went missing on April 11, 2016, after going to the Likquid Lounge, a bar in Chester that Tartaglione's brother operated.

    Prosecutors contend that Tartaglione had been involved in a drug ring and that Martin Luna owed money after failing to deliver cocaine. Luna was lured to the bar, where he brought his two nephews and Gutierrez, a family friend.

    According to court records, Tartaglione is believed to have killed Martin Luna at the bar, and the other three men were brought to the Otisville property and fatally shot there.

    The Associated Press and Journal News staff writer Jonathan Bandler contributed to this report

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    The former Westchester police officer charged in a quadruple homicide was hospitalized for more than two weeks last month after getting assaulted in federal prison, his lawyer said in a court document.

    Nicholas Tartaglione needed reconstructive surgery for a fractured eye socket bone, following the Feb. 11 incident at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in Manhattan.

    The details of Tartaglione's injury were contained in a letter asking U.S. District Judge Kenneth Karas for help getting Tartaglione safer accommodations with better access to legal assistance and "human necessities such as a toothbrush and eating utensils."

    "He is quite literally in a box staring at walls," Bruce Barket wrote last week of MCC's Special Housing Unit, known in prison lingo as 'the hole'. "Not surprisingly his mental health has declined."

    He suggested the conditions have hampered efforts to defend Tartaglione and prepare a mitigation case in the event prosecutors seek the death penalty.


    A spokesperson for the federal Bureau of Prisons did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment.

    FEDS: Tartaglione transported body while three other victims were shot

    FOUND: Four bodies dug up from ex-cop's property

    Checkered career
    Tartaglione had a checkered career working in several Westchester police departments, primarily Briarcliff Manor, where he retired in 2008.

    He was arrested in December 2016, the day before the bodies of the four victims were found buried on property he had previously rented in Otisville in Orange County.


    The men had been missing since April 11 that year, when prosecutors allege that Martin Luna was lured to a bar in Chester, NY, that was owned at the time by Tartaglione's brother.

    Luna had been involved in a botched drug deal with a group that included Tartaglione, prosecutors contend. He brought along two nephews, Urbano Santiago and Miguel Luna, and a family friend, Hector Gutierrez.

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    Authorities do not know how Martin Luna was killed but suspect that Tartaglione had left to bury the body on his property when the others were fatally shot.

    Months after Tartaglione was arrested, a second defendant, Joseph Biggs, was charged. Biggs lived in Nanuet and worked security at the Greenburgh-Graham School in Hastings-on-Hudson.

    Jail accommodations
    Barket said Tartaglione was initially kept in a Special Housing Unit at MCC and then transfered last spring to the Metropolitan Detention Center in Brooklyn, where he was housed in a unit set aside for defendants who were in law enforcement or needed similar protection.

    He was cited for two violations there. First he lost commissary privileges for six months because he wrote an email to a former inmate's wife. When he accepted commissary from another inmate, he was barred from having visitors and having phone and email privileges for three months.

    In December, Tartaglione was put in MDC's special housing unit and then transfered back to MCC.

    But despite his career in law enforcement, Tartaglione was put in general population, where the assault occurred last month.

    When Tartaglione got out of the hospital he was returned to the SHU at MCC, where he is denied books, legal documents, access to a telephone and computer

    When Barket asked a guard earlier this month why Tartaglione was in a completely empty cell, he said the guard replied, "It's jail."

    "There is a tendency in our system to verbally acknowledge a defendant's right to humane treatment and reasonable access to counsel, but then to normalize the severe and often inhumane conditions in the detention facilities," Barket wrote, calling the guard's attitude "all too pervasive."

    He acknowledged that the Constitution does not require "comfortable prison conditions" but suggested that Tartaglione's rights to prepare his defense and be free of cruel and unusual punishment are in jeopardy.

    Twitter: @jonbandler
    https://www.lohud.com/story/news/201...ide/441672002/

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    https://apnews.com/f6f14016c7b64a6d883a35a48b330298

    A Louisiana police chief apologized Thursday to his city and to the family of a black man shot and killed by a former police officer in 2016, saying the officer never should have been hired, at the same time his office announced a settlement reversing the officer’s 2018 firing and allowing him to resign instead.

    At a news conference in Baton Rouge, Police Chief Murphy Paul and a police lawyer detailed repeated problems with Officer Blane Salamoni that they said should have raised red flags long before Alton Sterling was shot and killed.

    Paul was not the chief at the time of the shooting, which launched days of protests over police treatment of black people.

    In particular, the lawyer, Leo Hamilton, said Salamoni had been arrested for a physical altercation prior to joining the police department, which normally would have prevented him from being hired. He also failed to disclose his arrest in his application, Hamilton said.

    The chief said the Sterling shooting was part of a well-documented pattern of “unprofessional behavior, police violence, marginalization, polarization and implicit bias by a man who should have never ever wore this uniform.”

    “I want to apologize to the family of Alton Sterling and also to his kids. We’re sorry because he (Salamoni) should’ve never been hired,” Paul said.

    Both state and federal officials declined to prosecute Salamoni and another officer involved in the altercation with Sterling, Howie Lake II. Salamoni — who fired all the shots that killed Sterling — was fired by Murphy in March 2018.

    Salamoni appealed and under the settlement announced Thursday, he’ll be allowed to voluntarily resign retroactive to March 2018 instead of being fired. He will not receive any compensation, Hamilton said.

    Hamilton said authorities continue to believe Salamoni’s firing was justified but said they advised settling because there was no guarantee that the firing wouldn’t be reversed in litigation. And Paul emphasized that Salamoni would never police Baton Rouge streets again.

    Salamoni’s lawyer, John McLindon, said they’re happy the settlement withdraws his termination and allows him to resign.

    McLindon said his client would have easily won reinstatement in an upcoming hearing but that he and Salamoni questioned what that would have achieved. McLindon said his client can resign and become an officer elsewhere if he wants.

    He said his client had been cleared by both state and federal officials and emphasized that Sterling had a gun and was pulling it out when Salamoni shot him. He criticized the chief’s comments critical of Salamoni, calling them “inappropriate.”

    McLindon also disputed that Salamoni had been arrested before starting with the police department.

    Officials did not give any information about Salamoni’s pre-employment arrest but The Advocate newspaper described a 2009 incident in downtown Baton Rouge in which Salamoni was detained by police after an off-duty sheriff’s deputy saw him yell at and shove a woman at a bar.

    Alton Sterling’s death came at a time of intense scrutiny across the country over the treatment of black people by police.

    Salamoni and Lake encountered Sterling after responding to a report of a man with a gun outside the Triple S Food Mart.

    Federal authorities, who opened a civil rights investigation immediately after the shooting, said Salamoni yelled that 37-year-old Sterling was reaching for a gun in his pocket before shooting him. The officers recovered a loaded revolver from Sterling’s pocket.

    Lake helped wrestle Sterling to the ground, but didn’t fire his gun.

    Two cellphone videos of the shooting quickly spread on social media, leading to nightly protests.

    Many of the protesters complained about historic tensions between Baton Rouge police and the city’s African American residents. The police chief addressed those concerns Thursday, acknowledging past problems with law enforcement behavior.

    “While we obviously cannot change the past, it is clear that we must change the future. And I sincerely apologize for the actions of the past and the role that our profession has played in building barriers in communities of color in the city of Baton Rouge,” Paul said.

    Hamilton listed numerous problems investigators discovered about Salamoni, including regular use of profanity and unnecessary force during his work.

    He even had problems with other officers. In one instance, Hamilton said Salamoni had a “blow up” with another officer that was so troublesome it caused another officer to say that if something wasn’t done about Salamoni, he could “eventually kill someone.”

    Sterling’s relatives have filed a lawsuit against the city. Michael Adams, a lawyer representing three of Sterling’s children in the civil suit, said it was “refreshing” to hear a police chief come out and speak so frankly about the officer’s shortcomings. But he said the city knew Salamoni was a bad cop who was poorly trained and protected from within the department.

    ___

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    https://ktla.com/2019/08/05/san-dieg...-dead-in-home/

    A San Diego Police Department sergeant arrested by fellow officers last week on suspicion of soliciting a minor for sex was found dead in his Carmel Valley home after missing a court appearance, authorities said.

    Joseph Ruvido, 49, was found unresponsive about 4:24 p.m. and ultimately pronounced dead, the San Diego Police Department said in a written statement.

    He had been scheduled to appear in San Diego County Superior Court at 1:30 p.m. for a hearing in his sex crime case, but never showed up, officials said. Officers went to the sergeant’s home to find out why he missed court.

    “After several attempts to reach him, the decision was made to force entry into his apartment,” Police Chief David Nisleit said during a press conference on Monday evening.

    “Once inside, officers found him deceased from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound,” the chief said.

    Ruvido was arrested on July 26 after his department received a tip regarding people looking for sex with minors, police said. He was a 21-yer veteran of the department.

    Details of the allegation against Ruvido have not been released.

    “Like many of you, I, too, have many questions that remain unanswered,” Nisleit said. “This is still an unfolding investigation.”

    Following Ruvido’s arrest, he was released from custody on $100,000 bail pending legal proceedings, officials said. In the meantime, he had been suspended from the police department without bail.

  12. #1887
    Senior Member blighted star's Avatar
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    Sydney's so fucked these days. This has been an issue for the last few years & it's getting ridiculous. Even before the last state election NSW Police had started doing mass strip search operations in public places, during broad daylight - this has included Central Station during peak hour.

    If a drug dog sits near you, you have to strip behind a portable screen they set up in a busy public area. It's fucked.


    I grew up in Sydney & I miss living there but I hate visiting now because it's so aggressively over-policed


    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-08-...scope/11435260


    Strip Searches In Spotlight After 21 Year Old Claims She's Been Targeted Six Times


    NSW Police's use of strip searches skyrocketing, report finds



    PHOTO: Crystal Smithers has been strip searched six times. (ABC News: David Collins)


    Police in NSW are using strip searches more than ever before, and many of them could be unlawful, according to a new report.

    Key points

    Thirty per cent of all strip searches result in a criminal charge

    One 21-year-old woman told the ABC she had been strip searched six times by police

    A police spokesperson said all recruits were taught how to undertake a strip search

    Under law, strip searches are only meant to be carried out as a last resort when circumstances are deemed serious and urgent, but experts claim searches are routinely used in non-urgent circumstances.


    "In many cases police aren't turning their minds to the legal criteria for conducting a strip search," said Dr Vicki Sentas, the lead author of a new report by the University of NSW.

    The research, commissioned by Redfern Legal Centre, has revealed there has been an almost 20-fold increase in the number of searches in the past 12 years.

    The study found between 2014-2015, and 2017-2018, searches in the field found nothing between 62.6 and 65.6 per cent of the time.

    Music festival fanatic Crystal Smithers, 21, said she had been strip searched six times at festivals.

    During her worst experience, Ms Smithers said she was made to strip naked, squat and cough, all while she was on her period.

    "I was made to take my clothes off completely, squat and told I'd have to take my tampon out if they believed I had something concealed inside me," she said.

    The officer didn't follow through, and Ms Smithers said no drugs have ever been found on her, but the whole experience made her feel humiliated and embarrassed.

    "She was a woman herself so surely she could have understood how uncomfortable that would have made me feel," Ms Smithers said.

    "I don't want to have to be pulled aside and strip searched and it ruin my whole night. It would be easier to stay at home and not go."

    She is now reconsidering her love of "hardstyle" festivals, which has involved attending 30 music festivals in the past three years.

    Wide interpretations
    Dr Sentas said laws governing strip searches in NSW were unclear and open to wide interpretations.

    "It's not very clear to police what exactly the definition of a strip search is," she said.

    "If [officers] don't realise what a strip search is, they don't realise it needs to be recorded as a strip search and then they won't need to follow the very serious mandatory rules to protect a person's privacy and dignity."

    According to the report, asking someone to remove their clothing and to squat and cough to dislodge secret items in their body does not legally amount to a strip search.

    "A strip search is not meant to be a cavity search," Dr Sentas said.

    "It's only meant to be a visual search and inspection of the body without touch."

    "There's no special legal provision in New South Wales authorising police to conduct the procedure known as squat and cough.

    "It's still a cavity search and in New South Wales a cavity search is defined as a forensic procedure and only a court can order it."

    Dr Vicki Senta holds her report at UNSW, she is wearing glasses and is standing next to a tall white man, another researcher.
    PHOTO: Dr Vicki Sentas said cavity searches can only be ordered by a court. (ABC News: David Collins)
    A NSW Police spokesperson said in a statement that all recruits were taught how to undertake a strip search and further training was provided throughout their career.

    "Police officers do not enjoy carrying out strip searches," the spokesperson said.

    "But it is a power that has been entrusted to us and searches reveal drugs and weapons."

    NSW police also said strip searches represented only 1 per cent of all searches conducted across NSW, but the searches were sometimes the only way to locate dangerous items, including weapons and drugs.

    "During this season's music festivals, police found many persons had secreted trafficable quantities of illegal drugs in their underwear or internally, including an 18-year-old woman who internally concealed 394 MDMA pills," the police spokesperson said.

    Data obtained by UNSW showed 30 per cent of all strip searches result in a criminal charge.

    The researchers say young people aged 25 and younger are among the most likely to be strip searched.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people also account for 10 per cent of all recorded strip searches in the field.

    In recent years there has been a sharp increase in the amount of young people seeking legal advice about strip searches, according to Sam Lee, head of Police Accountability at Redfern Legal Centre.

    "We actually need a change in the law to direct education of police on the ground," Ms Lee said.

    Ms Lee claimed safeguards like being searched in private, sealed off areas were also not being followed.

    The NSW Minister for Police, David Elliott, did not respond to requests for an interview but in a statement said that strip searches are governed by a "comprehensive legislative framework" that has "key safeguards".


    Also, fuck everyone in NSW who voted for 4 more years of this bullshit.

  13. #1888
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    Quote Originally Posted by blighted star View Post
    Sydney's so fucked these days. This has been an issue for the last few years & it's getting ridiculous. Even before the last state election NSW Police had started doing mass strip search operations in public places, during broad daylight - this has included Central Station during peak hour.

    If a drug dog sits near you, you have to strip behind a portable screen they set up in a busy public area. It's fucked.


    I grew up in Sydney & I miss living there but I hate visiting now because it's so aggressively over-policed


    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-08-...scope/11435260






    Also, fuck everyone in NSW who voted for 4 more years of this bullshit.
    Are they doing this to everyone or only the pretty girls? The article doesn't say what happens if the person doesn't agree to being strip searched, so what happens?, jail?

  14. #1889
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    Has anyone ever had drugs on them in the presence of a drug dog and the dog did nothing?

  15. #1890
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    https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/25/us/la...ted/index.html

    The California sheriff's deputy at the center of what was described as a sniper shooting admitted that he made it all up, authorities said.

    "There was no sniper, no shots fired and no gunshot injuries sustained to his shoulder," Los Angeles County Sheriff's (LASD) Homicide Bureau Capt. Kent Wegener told reporters at a news conference Saturday night.

    Deputy Angel Reinosa, 21, had previously said he was shot while walking to his personal car outside of the sheriff's station in Lancaster on Wednesday. The bullet came from a four-story apartment building across the street that houses people with mental health problems, Mayor R. Rex Parris said at the time, adding that a bulletproof vest saved Reinosa's life by deflecting the bullet into his shoulder.

    Police said Reinosa was taken to the hospital where he was treated for a minor, non-penetrating wound and that a pellet gun was retrieved from one of the apartments.

    The sheriff's department said the incident was targeting a deputy. The mayor described the shooter as a sniper.

    Police didn't find a shooter. But a nearby school was put on lockdown and officials said students were evacuated.

    Reinosa said he fabricated the entire incident, but did not provide a motive, Wegener said.

    Reinosa will be relieved of his duties and a criminal investigation into the incident is ongoing, LASD Assistant Sheriff Robin Limon said. Upon completion of the investigation, the case will be presented to the district attorney's office for filing consideration.

  16. #1891
    Senior Member Jumaki15's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    What fucking moron

  17. #1892
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    https://www.orlandosentinel.com/opin...bhq-story.html

    Lake County Deputy Sheriff Rick Palmer was responding to a noise complaint in an area with sand roads when a woman in a gold Mercury Marquis ran a stop sign and nearly plowed into him. He yelled at her to stop.

    She pulled over, got out and stepped toward him. He told investigators she was pulling “a dark object” out of her left pocket and kept coming though he ordered her to stop. He shot and wounded her.

    Later, Palmer would tell investigators his dashboard camera wasn’t recording because he hadn’t had time to turn on his overhead emergency lights and siren, which would have activated it.

    Perhaps that’s why the now 58-year-old Palmer felt comfortable telling the fairy tale he did about what happened in the remote Central Florida darkness that night.

    One snag: He turned out to be wrong about the camera.

    It was recording, and what it shows could now lead to a prison sentence. In late August, he was indicted on federal charges of violating Robin Pearson’s civil rights and misleading investigators about the shooting. The charges came two years after a state grand jury cleared him of a wrongful shooting and went on to apologize for investigating the incident at all.

    What Palmer didn’t know was that the Sheriff’s Office was testing several different camera brands, and one of them — his — ran all the time. Activating emergency lights only prevented erasing what was captured.

    And this camera captured it all. The video, obtained this week by the Orlando Sentinel, shows Pearson, now 54, getting out of the Mercury with her hands up and within two seconds stumbling backward and dropping to the ground after taking a bullet that hit her hip and lodged in her backside.

    Pearson drops her hands slightly as she stepped toward Palmer, but they are always visible and never go near any pocket, as Palmer claimed.

    The average thoughtful reader might presume Palmer, a 19-year veteran with a clean disciplinary record, got in trouble at least for telling a version of the incident that so clearly contradicts the evidence.

    But, no.

    State Attorney Brad King’s office took the Palmer case before a grand jury, a one-sided proceeding in which prosecutors have the power to shape the outcome — whether to indict or not.

    This case was no exception.



    King’s office declined to discuss the grand jury but released its report, which was one long wail of excuses for Palmer’s untruthfulness and his actions — it was dark, he was in a dangerous area, he was under stress, human memory isn’t reliable. It went on to explain why grand jurors explored the case — as if they shouldn’t? — saying police do “dangerous” and “important work” and often are “undervalued” by a community.

    By the time Palmer testified six months after the shooting, his account had become more elaborate.

    The report indicates Palmer testified that he saw a “dark object” in Pearson’s hand before she got out of the car, and he claims to have seen her put it into her pocket as she climbed out of the Mercury.

    The report refers to Pearson by her initials:

    “Deputy Palmer said that R.P. then got out of the car, began walking quickly toward him, did not obey his commands to stop and got something out of her pocket, which he perceived to be a gun, whereupon he fired one shot,” the grand jury report stated.

    Now, grand jurors may be gullible, but they are not blind. They could clearly see in the video that Pearson’s hands never went near her pockets.

    That’s where the state apparently started calling witnesses to explain it all away.

    First, grand jurors were told that just being mistaken about the “dark object” being a gun isn’t enough “malice” to charge a deputy.

    But then, the report indicated, prosecutors went further — deep where they shouldn’t have tread.

    “We have heard testimony about the effects of stress on human perception and recall. Specifically, it is well known among experts in the field that, in times of high stress, human beings often experience distortions of time, of sight, of hearing and of memory.

    “It can also cause decision-making to rely less upon judgment and more upon instinct,” stated the report, dated March 24, 2017.

    Huh? Ask this: When was the last time the state brought in “experts” to help explain away a suspect’s actions?

    “Given the totality of the circumstances, we cannot exclude the possibility that Deputy Palmer may have fired the shot in genuine fear for his safety, even though there was no actual threat to him,” stated the report, signed by the grand jury foreman.

    Uh-oh. If Palmer hallucinates under stress, what other cases has he made in which he “saw” things that he didn’t happen?

    This grand jury was a charade. The prosecutor’s office, behaving as Palmer’s defense attorney, conducted a secret mini-trial of its own behind closed doors and cleared the deputy.

    Let’s remember that this is the office run by the same prosecutor trying death cases in Orange County because former Gov. Rick Scott appointed King to the job after Orange prosecutor Aramis Ayala said she wouldn’t seek the death penalty any more. Can King be trusted to provide equal justice for everyone? His office’s actions in this case certainly raise questions.

    Now the feds are intent on giving the case a legitimate airing in public.

    It’s unclear what prompted this second look at the case, which resulted in a federal grand jury in Orlando indicting Palmer on a charge of depriving Pearson of her civil right to be left free of “unreasonable force” from a law-enforcement officer. He faces a second count of “knowingly” misleading FDLE agents to cover up the civil rights violation.

  18. #1893
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    https://www.cnn.com/2019/11/01/us/an...ing/index.html

    A former Georgia police officer was sentenced to 12 years in prison Friday for the killing of a mentally ill, unarmed and naked black man in 2015.

    DeKalb County Superior Court Judge LaTisha Dear Jackson gave Robert "Chip" Olsen a 20-year term, with 12 years to be served in custody. Under the sentence, Olsen is prohibited from working in law enforcement, possessing firearms or profiting from the case.

    Dear Jackson praised what she said was the strength, fortitude and compassion of the family of the victim, 26-year-old Afghanistan war veteran Anthony Hill. She said she had also watched the defendant closely during the trial.

    "Many might have thought you were stoic and void of emotion," the judge told Olsen. "From the time opening statements started, I saw the tears that you've had. I saw how you replayed March 9, 2015, in your head."

    Prosecutors had asked the court for a 25-year sentence with five years probation.

    A jury last month acquitted Olsen of murder in the March 2015 death of Hill but found him guilty of aggravated assault, making a false statement and two counts of violation of oath.

    Jurors deliberated for more than a week. Olsen had faced up to 35 years in prison.

    Before sentencing, the court heard from Hill's mother, father and sister.

    "The decision Robert Olsen made that day changed my life forever," said his mother, Carolyn Baylor Giummo. "It was the worst day of my life."

    She remembered her son as a compassionate child, a talented choir singer and student-athlete whose life seemed to change after his deployment to Afghanistan.

    "He didn't come back unscathed," she said. At the time of the shooting, Hill had had stopped taking his medications because of side effects and suffered a breakdown, she said.

    Giummo recalled her father always telling her and his grandchildren that "if you're ever in trouble, run to the police."

    "The jury may have found Mr. Robert Olsen not guilty of murder but he still killed my son," she told the court. "He has never taken responsibility for taking my son's life. He's never just said, 'I'm sorry for killing Tony.'"

  19. #1894
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    https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article...m-george-floyd

    How Police unions escalate racism and Brutality is coming into the forefront as the George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and now David McAtee fallout are escalating.

    More than a year before a Minneapolis police officer, Derek Chauvin, pinned George Floyd to the ground in a knee chokehold, Mayor Jacob Frey banned “warrior” training for the city’s police force.

    Private trainers across the country host seminars, frequently at taxpayer expense, teaching “killology” and pushing the notion that if officers aren’t willing to “snuff out a life” then they should “consider another line of work.” Frey explained that this type of training — which has accompanied the increasing militarization of the police over the last few decades — undermined the community-based policing he wanted the city to adopt after a string of high-profile killings in the region.

    But then the police union stepped in.

    The Police Officers Federation of Minneapolis worked out a deal with a company to offer warrior training. For free. For as long as Frey was mayor.

    Like in Minneapolis, police unions across the country have bucked reforms meant to promote transparency and racial equity in law enforcement. Many of these unions have pushed collective bargaining agreements that make it all but impossible for departments to punish, much less fire, officers. These agreements defang civilian review boards and police internal affairs departments, and they even prevent police chiefs from providing meaningful oversight, according to community activists and civil rights lawyers. Meanwhile, the unions have set up legal slush funds to defend officers sued for misconduct.

    In Albuquerque, where officers have been monitored by the federal government under what’s called a consent decree after a yearslong pattern of killing its own citizens, the police union had been paying $500 to officers who’d killed someone in the line of duty. The union called it a supportive service to the officer during a traumatic time. Critics called it a bounty, and only public outrage over the practice persuaded the union to stop. In the wake of Floyd’s death, violent protests have rocked the city.

    Last year in Phoenix, a report revealed police officers had posted racist memes on social media, including one officer thanking George Zimmerman, the man who shot 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, “for cleaning up our community one thug at a time.” Their union officials sought a deal to offer its members a service to scrub their profile pages. Phoenix officers last Saturday arrested 114 Floyd demonstrators.

    And in St. Louis, the city’s first black woman to serve as lead prosecutor, Kimberly Gardner, sued the police union claiming it has tried to obstruct her efforts to reform the force. A separate union of black police officers sided with Gardner, saying the department and union has a culture “accepting of racism, discrimination, corruption.” Police in nearby Ferguson, site of Michael Brown’s killing by an officer in 2014, fired tear gas Sunday night at police violence protests — as they had done in the aftermath of Brown’s death.

    Police unions have made important strides like raising pay, improving working conditions and instituting due process procedures. Officers in unions make almost 40% more than their nonunionized colleagues. Some unions, particularly those representing black and brown officers, have backed reforms and spoken out against what they view as bad practices. Yet a University of Chicago study found that between 1996 and 2015, newly unionized law enforcement agencies saw a 27% uptick in misconduct complaints — a phenomenon the researchers tied largely to protections afforded by union contracts.

    The phone number for the Minneapolis Police Officers Federation wasn’t working when BuzzFeed News made several attempts on Sunday to call for comment. As of Sunday, the union’s website and Facebook account had been taken down, although it was unclear why. The National Fraternal Order of Police issued a statement condemning Chauvin’s actions.
    Part 1

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    https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article...m-george-floyd

    Part 2

    This incident should not “be allowed to define our profession or the Minneapolis Police Department,” the statement reads, “but there is no doubt that this incident has diminished the trust and respect our communities have for the men and women of law enforcement. We will work hard to rebuild that trust and we will continue to protect our communities.”

    These police unions have grown larger in membership and farther to the right in their political ideologies in recent years. The Minneapolis chapter sold “Cops for Trump” T-shirts on its website, and national police unions have publicly endorsed Trump. There’s an alphabet soup of organizations representing police, from the International Union of Police Associations in Florida to the Fraternal Order of the Police in Tennessee. The FOP, one of the nation’s largest police unions, swelled to 341,946 at the end of 2019, its highest total in a decade. Unions represented about 60% of officers scattered among more than 18,000 police departments across the country. The rise in their memberships, police observers say, was a backlash to the demands for police reforms by the Obama administration and by grassroots organizations like Black Lives Matter.

    Yet police observers, scholars, and civil rights lawyers and activists told BuzzFeed News that the strength of these unions and the deals they struck with local governments that offer rigorous job protections have helped create cultures in which the officers are left unaccountable and black and brown people are left dead.

    Jonathan M. Smith, who oversaw the investigation of 26 police departments as a Department of Justice attorney and is executive director of the Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs, said labor agreements that prioritize police job security over public safety aren’t in the officers’ best interests, either.

    “If you leave a bad officer on the street, that has a very damaging effect on every other officer,” Smith said. “No one on the street is going to say that’s a good officer and that’s a bad officer.”

    He pointed to Chauvin, who had racked up a number of complaints yet remained on the force, as an example.

    “Had those been addressed in an appropriate way, not only would Mr. Floyd be alive, we wouldn’t have the disruption in the community and you might have actually saved his career if you put him on the right path earlier on,” Smith said.

    Instead, Minneapolis’s contract governs everything from officer pay rates to patrol areas and discipline. Minneapolis’s contract, similar to others, states that “investigations into an employee’s conduct which do not result in the imposition of discipline shall not be entered into the employee’s official personnel file.” Translation: Since only around 1% of complaints adjudicated since 2012 have resulted in an officer being disciplined, city records show, most complaints will be erased. That helps to explain why the department’s Internal Affairs listed 17 complaints for Chauvin, while the city’s public database of officer complaints had 12, and a local advocacy group, Communities United Against Police Brutality, had 10, but several that didn’t match the other two sources. Minneapolis isn’t alone. Cleveland had a policy that required complaints to be removed from the city’s misconduct database after six months. At least 40 other municipalities allow for some form of erasure of disciplinary records, according to a database maintained by the police accountability organization Campaign Zero.

    Law professor Stephen Rushin of Loyola University Chicago found that those investigating misconduct have to wait at least 48 hours before they can interview the suspected officer, per provisions in union contracts in at least 50 cities. Investigators in at least 34 cities also have to provide accused officers of all the evidence against them ahead of their interrogations, according to Rushin’s study.

    Some advocates claim this waiting period is nothing more than an opportunity for officers to get their stories straight and escape scrutiny.

    And even if an officer is found in violation of department policies, police chiefs don’t always have the final word in firing them. Like most labor union contracts, members have a contractual right to a grievance process. That process, in most contracts, means that fired officers can plead their cases in front of an arbitrator, as outlined in state labor laws. A St. Paul Pioneer-Press investigation found that about 46% of the time arbitrators ruled in favor of fired officers, allowing them to rejoin the force.

    Dave Bicking is a community activist with the group Minneapolis for a Better Police Contract who describes himself as “an old union guy” and a supporter of officers’ grievance and arbitration rights. He said he’s read chilling accounts of officer behavior but has agreed with the arbitrator’s decision to reinstate the officer because the decision hewed to the rights laid out in the contract.

    “Because the city never disciplines anybody, any discipline is inconsistent with past practice,” he said, referring to the common practice of basing decisions on past precedent. “You can’t discipline now because you’ve never disciplined before. It’s a real Catch-22.”

    Ron DeLord, a former Texas state police union leader and an attorney who has negotiated scores of law enforcement contracts, said blame for robust officer protections shouldn’t rest with the unions.

    “Who hires the police?” DeLord asked. “Who trains the police? Who writes the policies? Who pays for the continuing training and who pays the salaries to get the type of people that you want to be there? Not the union.”

    That’s on the cities, DeLord said.

    Bicking, the activist, agrees. He said Minneapolis has shirked responsibility for reforming the department by hiding behind a contract they’ve done little to change.

    “Always in the past, you bring up anything to city council and they’re like, ‘Ahhh, we wish we could do that but our hands are tied by the police contract,’” he said. “And then every three years, they ratify the exact same language and days later they’re back to, ‘We can’t do anything.’”

    “This kind of inaction is why the city is burning,” Bicking said.

    Yet there’s a reason why so many elected officials relent when police contracts come up for renewal. The unions have political clout — offering politicians a big voting block of their members and those who support them. They also raise campaign contributions for elected officials who support their agenda.



    The FOP has its own political action committee complete with its own lobbyists to push legislation benefiting police. Local chapters have been political actors, too, pouring $700,000 into a Santa Ana City Council race to unseat a councilor who voted against a pay increase for officers.

    In San Francisco, the city’s police officers’ association also spent $700,000 to try to beat former public defender Chesa Boudin, who successfully ran for district attorney on a progressive agenda. That union money was almost as much as Boudin had raised for his own campaign.

    Police unions in cities across the country have a force with which few city officials want to reckon. In Los Angeles, for example, the city is looking to save $139 million by furloughing 16,000 employees who will see a 10% pay cut after the coronavirus cratered the economy. But the mayor won’t back away from a 4.8% LAPD raise that will cost the city $123 million in the next budget year, according to a report in the Los Angeles Times.

    New York, too, faces a budget shortfall estimated at $10 billion in the wake of the coronavirus crisis. New York Mayor Bill de Blasio has proposed chopping 3% from schools while only cutting the police budget by 0.3%.

    Yet the unions’ political power isn’t without its limits.

    Activists in Austin pressured city officials in 2017 to reject a proposed contract with the police department that didn’t provide enough police oversight. Through those efforts, the city council voted down the contract, becoming what’s thought to be the first governing body to do so. The Austin Justice Coalition pressed the union to cede more ground, including increasing the amount of time to investigate civilian complaints, an independent oversight board, and an online complaint system.

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    https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article...m-george-floyd

    Part 3

    DeLord, the police union negotiator, was on the other side of the table from the Austin advocates.

    Some of the reforms wanted by advocates remind DeLord of 1969, when he joined the Beaumont, Texas police. The Supreme Court had recently decided that police had to read suspects their rights before questioning them. That line heard time after time in cop shows and movies? “You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say or do can be used against you” is the byproduct of that ruling.

    DeLord remembers a sergeant bemoaning that reading those rights signaled “the end of policing.”

    The resistance by some police officers to the changes activists want now remind DeLord of that Beaumont sergeant and his reaction to the Supreme Court ruling — that these changes, surely, will be the ones to end policing.

    “We’re entering a new world but it’s a new world that each generation entered,” he said. “Are we ever going to get to 100%? Gandhi and Mother Teresa aren’t available ... But it’s an evolution.”

    In Minneapolis, Floyd’s death has made the need for that evolution even more urgent.

    It comes at a time when the city is in the middle of negotiating a new police contract.

    But neither Bicking nor other activists pressing for more oversight can say much about those talks. That’s because, earlier this year, the union asked to move the talks behind closed doors.

    The city didn’t oppose it.

  22. #1897
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
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    https://www.ktnv.com/news/crime/las-...of-child-abuse

    LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department said it had arrested two of its officers in connection with a child abuse incident.

    The situation involved a child's mother, Destini Woodruff, 26, and stepfather, John Woodruff, 29, who are both LVMPD police officers.

    The investigation determined that the Woodruffs hit a child multiple times to inflict pain on May 9 that left the child with numerous bruises.

    Investigators with the criminal investigation section received their information about the incident on May 14, and the two were then arrested on May 19 and transported to the Clark County Detention Center.

    Preventing child abuse and neglect in Las Vegas valley

    Destini and John Woodruff are facing the following charges, according to LVMPD:

    -Conspiracy to commit child abuse
    -Child Abuse (three counts)
    -Domestic battery by strangulation


    Destini and John Woodruff have been employed by the Las Vegas police department since 2016 and were assigned to the Southeast Area Command, Community Policing Division.

    However, on May 19, Destini Woodruff was relieved of duty and placed on administrative leave without pay. Also, as a result of a separate internal investigation, John Woodruff's employment with the department was terminated.

  23. #1898
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    https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...m_content=news

    SARASOTA, Fla. — A video that surfaced Monday shows a Sarasota policeman kneeling on a man’s back and neck while he was arrested in May. It prompted Sarasota Police Chief Bernadette DiPino, who 48 hours earlier condemned the tactic, to put the officer on administrative leave.

    The Sarasota Police Department issued a statement Monday saying it was tagged in a social media post showing “a portion of a video” of an arrest of Patrick Carroll, a black 27-year-old Sarasota man who was later charged with felony possession of ammunition by a convicted felon.

    He was also charged with misdemeanor resisting arrest and domestic violence.

    DiPino put the male officer, who has not yet been identified, on leave after viewing the videos.

    “Chief DiPino was disturbed to see an officer kneeling on the head and neck of an individual in the video,” SPD said in an emailed statement. “While it appears the officer eventually moves his leg to the individual’s back, this tactic is not taught, used or advocated by our agency.”

    Warning: This video contains graphic content. Viewer discretion is advised.

    Carroll, who was allegedly involved in a fight on Dixie Avenue with a woman, did not require medical attention and did not complain about injuries during the incident, the statement said.

    An unidentified man who took cellphone video of the arrest, which shows Carroll lying handcuffed facedown on the ground, shouts at officers, “You got your knee on my man’s neck, man, on his neck, bro.”

    The officer appears to adjust his position and move his knee onto Carroll’s back, while two other male officers stood over them watching.

    While the incident apparently did not cause harm to Carroll, it strikes an eerie resemblance to video of George Floyd, who was killed after Minneapolis policeman Derek Chauvin kneeled on his neck, leaving him unable to breathe, in a nearly 9-minute-long video.

    The incident has sparked nationwide protests that have resulted in demonstrations in major cities. Police have responded by firing tear gas and non-lethal munitions to disperse the activists.

    In response to the incident, law enforcement agencies around the country have denounced the action of Chauvin and other Minneapolis officers who witnessed Floyd’s death.

    DiPino wrote a message to the community and posted it on social media.

    An excerpt from her letter said, “The men and women of the Sarasota Police Department are not trained to use tactics I’ve seen in the videos in Minneapolis. The actions of the officers in Minneapolis were inexcusable.”

    DiPino promised transparency to keep the community safe.

    SPD submitted a redacted arrest report to the Herald-Tribune on Monday night.

    According to the report, which was also posted on the police department’s social media accounts, three officers responded to Dixie Avenue for a report of a battery.

    A suspect, identified as Patrick Carroll, got into a fight with a female victim, whose identity has been withheld because of Marsy’s Law. She had swelling on her arms, face, and chest area, officers reported.

    The victim told police that Carroll came to her home and said he would not leave because his children were there. She said Carroll told her to “shut up” or he was going to hit her in the mouth. A verbal argument ensued and she said Carroll grabbed her hair, the report stated.

    The victim said she grabbed Carroll’s hair to free herself and he began to swing her. She used her arms to block him. She said Carroll threw her to the ground and left. She called 911.

    Carroll was found in the 1800 block of 23rd Street in Sarasota. He was wearing a light blue backpack and, at first, was cooperative with the police.

    Carroll said he went to the victim’s house to pick up some clothes. He found some of his clothes strewn on the lawn. He said she began yelling and cursing at him and threatened to call the police, so he packed a few things and left.

    Carroll denied striking the woman, according to the report.

    Carroll allegedly told his cousin to grab his blue bag before the police got it.

    When an officer tried to put him into the patrol car he turned his body and yelled at them. He dropped his body weight to avoid being put into the car, police said. They took him to the ground with “minimal force,” the report said.

    The report did not mention how police restrained Carroll.

    A search of Carroll’s body found a baggie of marijuana; his backpack contained a box of change and four .22-caliber bullets, police said. A criminal search found that he had one felony conviction.

    The victim declined domestic violence services and the Florida Department of Children and Families was notified because the alleged act occurred in front of children.

    Carroll was placed in a patrol car and taken to the Sarasota County jail without incident. He paid $37,500 bail — $30,000 on a count of misdemeanor battery — and was released May 19.

    SPD said it did not receive any complaints from citizens regarding the video “but is taking this incident seriously.”

  24. #1899
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    https://www.9news.com/article/news/l...b-171c767583f1

    DENVER, Colorado — Police are investigating an incident captured on multiple videos that show police spraying a man with pepper ball rounds while he screams that there’s a pregnant woman inside his car.

    “Honestly I thought I was going to die. I thought I was going to be the next black man shot by police,” Shaiitarrio Brown told 9NEWS. “I still feel that way.”

    The incident happened early Saturday morning in downtown Denver amid the protests and riots when crowds gathered to call for justice in the death of George Floyd.

    RELATED: Dumpster fires, vandalism in Denver during 3rd night of protests

    Brown said he and his pregnant fiancee, Brittany King, were doing mobile food orders that night.

    He said his car was hit by a pepper ball round, which prompted him to confront police just before he was sprayed.

    “We’re not protestors, we are not part of the riots," Brown said. "We were delivering food. We were working. For them to just go out of their way to shoot innocent people was unfair. And then I proceeded to tell them that there’s a pregnant woman in the car, and that’s when they unloaded 50 to 75-plus rounds into my car with my pregnant girlfriend in it,” Brown said.

    King said she is 18 weeks pregnant and that her unborn child had a high heart rate when she finally was able to get to the hospital. She said her hand was also fractured when she tried to block her face.

    The incident was captured on video by several different people and has been widely shared. One of them, originally captured by a YouTuber named “Ghost Writer,” spread to Twitter where it now has more than 4 million views.

    RELATED: Complaint filed against City of Denver alleges misuse of less-lethal weapons by police

    Denver Police Chief Paul Pazen requested an investigation when he saw the video, according to spokesperson Sonny Jackson.

    “Denver Police Chief Paul Pazen has ordered an investigation into this matter. That investigation is ongoing," Jackson said in a statement sent over email. "Chief Pazen is currently listed as the complainant, as the persons featured in the video have not come forward so no outside formal complaint has been filed.”

    Brown and King have retained an attorney who said DPD needs to change their behavior and their policies surrounding the use of pepper ball rounds.

    “There’s so many agencies and officers that do their job in an excellent manner, but this on the other hand, is bias policing," attorney Scott Melin said. "It’s militarized policing. It’s abusive policing and a violation of my client's constitutional rights.”

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    https://www.washingtonpost.com/inves...82b_story.html

    Protests against the use of deadly force by police swept across the country in 2015.

    Demonstrators marched in Chicago, turned chaotic in Baltimore, and occupied the area outside a Minneapolis police station for weeks. Protesters repeatedly took to the streets of Ferguson, Mo., where a white police officer had killed a black teenager the previous year and fueled anew a national debate about the use of force and how police treat minorities.

    That year, The Washington Post began tallying how many people were shot and killed by police. By the end of 2015, officers had fatally shot nearly 1,000 people, twice as many as ever documented in one year by the federal government.

    A dozen high-profile fatal encounters that have galvanized protests nationwide

    With the issue flaring in city after city, some officials vowed to reform how police use force.

    The next year, however, police nationwide again shot and killed nearly 1,000 people. Then they fatally shot about the same number in 2017 ? and have done so for every year after that, according to The Post?s ongoing count. Since 2015, police have shot and killed 5,400 people.

    This toll has proved impervious to waves of protests, such as those now flooding American streets in the wake of George Floyd?s death at the hands of police in Minneapolis. The number killed has remained steady despite fluctuating crime rates, changeovers in big-city police leadership and a nationwide push for criminal justice reform.

    Even amid the coronavirus pandemic and orders that kept millions at home for weeks, police shot and killed 463 people through the first week of June ? 49 more than the same period in 2019. In May, police shot and killed 110 people, the most in any one month since The Post began tracking such incidents.

    The year-over-year consistency has confounded those who have spent decades studying the issue.

    ?It is difficult to explain why we haven?t seen significant fluctuations in the shooting from year to year,? former Charlotte police chief Darrel Stephens said. ?There?s been significant investments that have been made in de-escalation training. There?s been a lot of work.?

    The overwhelming majority of people killed are armed. Nearly half of all people fatally shot by police are white. Most of these shootings draw little or no attention beyond a news story.

    Some become flash points in the country?s ongoing reckoning about race and police. The ones prompting the loudest outcries often involve people who are black, unarmed, or both, shootings that have led to the harshest scrutiny of police.

    Since The Post began tracking the shootings, black people have been shot and killed by police at disproportionate rates ? both in terms of overall shootings and the shootings of unarmed Americans. The number of black and unarmed people fatally shot by police has declined since 2015, but whether armed or not, black people are still shot and killed at a disproportionately higher rate than white people.

    Some of the most incendiary moments in recent years involving police and race occurred without a gunshot.

    Eric Garner was videotaped pleading for air with a New York police officer?s arm around his neck before his death in 2014. Freddie Gray died of a severe spinal injury in Baltimore the following year, suffered when he was transported in a police van wearing shackles but not a seat belt.

    The outrage now rippling across America began when a video from Minneapolis showed Floyd, hands cuffed behind his back and prone on the ground, gasping ?I can?t breathe? as a white police officer drove his knee into the black man?s neck. The officer held it there for nearly nine minutes, prosecutors said. For almost three of those minutes, Floyd was not responsive, they said.

    It was the kind of use-of-force incident that might have gone otherwise unnoticed. Minneapolis police initially reported that Floyd ?physically resisted officers? and then ?appeared to be suffering medical distress.? No weapons of any kind were used, police added.

    Then the video footage emerged. It showed Floyd pinned on the street, begging for air, calling for his mother, for minute after minute. He was pronounced dead not long after. The officer and three others with him at the scene were fired, and all face criminal charges.
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