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Thread: Geraldine Anita Largay, (66) missing since July 2013 from Appalachian Trail

  1. #1
    Senior Member raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Geraldine Anita Largay, (66) missing since July 2013 from Appalachian Trail

    http://www.mpbn.net/Home/tabid/36/ct...6/Default.aspx

    Maine Authorities Search for Missing Tenn. Woman
    Authorities say 66-year-old Geraldine Anita Largay of Brentwood, Tenn., was supposed to meet her husband Monday in Wyman Township in western Maine, but never showed up.

    Geraldine is on the left in the photo:

    SANDY RIVER PLANTATION, Maine (AP) _ Maine authorities are continuing their search for a Tennessee woman who went missing while hiking the Appalachian Trail.

    A spokesman for the Maine Warden Service says 66-year-old Geraldine Anita Largay of Brentwood, Tenn., was supposed to meet her husband Monday in Wyman Township in western Maine, but never showed up.

    Wardens learned that on Wednesday, an employee of a nearby motel received a call from a female hiker who said she had spent Tuesday night with Largay in a lean-to on the trail.

    She did not leave a name and wardens are asking that woman to come forward.

    Authorities say they will continue their search for Largay on Friday.

    The 5-foot-5, 115-pound Largay was last seen wearing a black pullover shirt, tan pants, a blue hat and a black-and-green backpack.

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    http://www.pressherald.com/news/sear...l?pagenum=full
    Searchers puzzled by why hiker vanished
    The case of Geraldine Largay, who disappeared on the Appalachian Trail last week, is an anomaly.


    One day last week, Kathy Odvody said 12 people asked her if she was Geraldine Largay, the missing hiker from Tennessee.

    "One night, I couldn't sleep," said Odvody, 62, who thinks she was hiking a portion of trail between Rangeley and Wyman Township a day behind Largay last weekend, but never saw her. "I was thinking about her."

    Every year, about 28 Appalachian Trail hikers get lost in Maine, said Lt. Kevin Adam of the Maine Warden Service.

    But almost every time, they're quickly found: 95 percent of the time, searchers find them in 12 hours. Within 24 hours, 98 percent of lost hikers are found.

    That makes the case of Largay, 66, of Brentwood, Tenn., who had set out for Baxter State Park on the trail from Harpers Ferry, W.Va., an anomaly.

    She text-messaged her husband last Sunday, saying she was atop Saddleback Mountain, near Rangeley. That night, she planned to stay at Poplar Ridge at a lean-to on the trail in Redington Township. Her last message to him Monday said she was headed north on the trail, according to the warden service.

    But she never made a scheduled meeting with her husband, set for Tuesday in the parking lot near where the Appalachian Trail crosses Route 27 in Wyman Township.

    After Poplar Ridge, Largay's next stop would have been Spaulding Mountain in Mount Abram Township, a seven-mile hike, wardens say.

    A hiker has reported seeing Largay -- who went by the name "Inchworm" on the trail -- between those two places, but it isn't clear whether she made it to Spaulding Mountain, from where she should have headed north toward Sugarloaf and the crossing.

    On day five of the search, Adam, running the search for Largay from a command post at Sugarloaf, a ski and golf resort in Carrabassett Valley, was worried.

    "It is a mystifying search because we've done a lot of tactics that would normally produce results by now," he said. "Why, all of a sudden, did she disappear?"

    Adam said crews -- in total, made up of 70 people -- were searching an 18-mile area of trail between Route 4, near Rangeley, and Route 27 on Sunday.

    The wardens have used "hasty searches" mostly, aimed at covering the most obvious places a lost person should be in the shortest amount of time possible, Adam said.

    On Saturday, the warden service said 130 people searched for Largay. Wardens, dog teams, the Maine Association for Search and Rescue, U.S. Border Patrol and Civil Air Patrol members on ATVs, on horseback and in aircraft, have searched the area around Spaulding Mountain, about seven miles as the crow flies to the Route 27 crossing.

    The topography of the area makes the search difficult, Adam said.

    That's shown best by taking a chairlift ride 3,600 feet up Sugarloaf Mountain. A short hike to the northern bank of the mountain shows a treacherous environment.

    Between the mountain and Flagstaff Lake, there's a deep valley and another steep peak. That descends into the man-made lake 10 miles away in a basin.

    Until you look at the search area, Adam said, "you don't have any appreciation for it."

    On most searches, crews search for two hours. If they don't find anything, they return to the command post and re-evaluate the search. On this search, it takes one or two hours just for them to get to the correct area, he said.

    And if a hiker were to get off the trail near Spaulding Mountain, there are hazards: big slides, streams and basins Adam calls "people-catchers," hard to search in and get in and out of, he said.

    "Some of those are very problematic to get down into the bottom of," he said. "We've got to do it, but why would she do it?"

    Odvody, the hiker from Waynesville, N.C., who goes by the name "Kaleidoscope" on the Appalachian Trail and said she has hiked half of it in her life, said the section of trail between Route 4 and Route 27 is "way more dangerous" than many other sections of the trail.

    "If you go like six inches over, you can fall into forever and ever and ever-land," said Odvody, ending a 65-mile, weeklong series of hikes at the Route 27 crossing in Wyman Township on Sunday.

    Wardens have said Largay is 5-foot-5 and weighs 115 pounds with brown hair and brown eyes. She was last seen wearing a black shirt, tan pants and a blue hat and carrying a black-and-green backpack.

    Her husband, George Largay, shook a reporter's hand at the warden service's command post, saying he shakes hands with each person helping to find his wife.

    But he declined an interview and returned to a warden service trailer, where Adam said wardens were keeping four family members in case they find belongings of Largay's that need identifying.

    "They're hopeful and very concerned that their wife, mother has been missing for multiple days in the woods of Maine," Adam said. "And I would be, too."

    Late last week, George Largay told Portland television station WCSH that if lost, his wife would "use a lot of common sense to give herself the best chance of getting rescued," and he would "call in the cavalry and throw in everything, including the kitchen sink, to find her in one piece."

    Until wardens find Largay, Adam said it's hard to speculate as to what happened to her. He said he is worried she is dead or injured because of the natural hazards off the trail, but there is also a chance she is still walking.

    Addressing the possibility of foul play, he said wardens haven't found any sign of violence, and crime on the Appalachian Trail, especially in Maine, is rare.

    Odvody, hiking the last portion of her trip alone, said the possibility of violence doesn't cross her mind on the trail. She's more worried about falling and getting injured.

    "I never feel afraid in the woods," she said. "This trail is so safe and there's so much community."

  3. #3
    Senior Member raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Looks like this site is giving daily updates:
    http://www.sjvalley-times.com/view/f...homesecondleft

    Search continues for missing hiker Geraldine Largay

    July 29 UPDATE: The search continues. Approximately 30 searchers will be out today, according to a press release from the Maine Warden Service. Searchers today will include Maine game wardens, Mahoosuc SAR, U.S. Border Patrol, and the Maine Forest Service. The high probability search area is approximately eight miles on the Appalachian Trail. It begins about one-half mile south of the Caribou Valley Road and extends south to Route 27, near Rangeley; encompassing roughly 81 square miles. Those with any information should call the Maine State Police Communications Center in Augusta at 207-624-7076 or 1-800-452-4664 (Maine only).

    July 27 UPDATE: Maine game wardens are seeking information concerning missing hiker Geraldine Largay from the following hikers using the trail names: ?Cowboy,? ?Marathon," ?Postman,? ?Breeze,? ?Paranoid,? ?Crunchmaster," ?Harpo/Groucho," ?Ice Pack/SOBO ?13,? "Luke 11:9,? ?Sandman,? ?BBTGR,? and ?.com/Queen.? Largay uses the trail name "Inchworm." Warden investigators need to speak with the listed hikers to determine and verify if Largay was seen between the Poplar Ridge Lean-to and the Spaulding Mountain Lean-to on the Appalachian Trail. Warden investigators also need to verify if the missing hiker stayed overnight at the Spaulding Mountain Lean-to on Monday night, July 22 into Tuesday morning, July 23. The Warden Service also wants to inform bear baiters baiting in the search area to be on the lookout for Largay. Those with any information should call the Public Safety Communications Center in Augusta at 207-624-6076. or 1-800-452-4664

    MOUNT ABRAM, Maine - No new information is available this evening , Friday, July 26, regarding missing hiker Geraldine Largay's location.

    Today, approximately 60 people searched for Largay. A Maine Forest Service helicopter was utilized today as well.

    Maine Warden Service fixed-wing aircraft was not used due to weather. A command post has been established at the Sugarloaf Mountain Resort and will be utilized tomorrow.

    Search efforts continue to concentrate on the Appalachian Trail north of the Spaulding lean-to in Mount Abram TWP toward the Route 27 crossing in Wyman TWP. (Mount Abram is located near Bethel, in western Maine.) Between those two points are numerous overlapping roads and trails. Search efforts will resume tomorrow morning. Information gathering and logistical planning will occur this evening.

    Wardens continue to seek information as to the identity of the female hiker who reported staying at the Spaulding lean-to with Largay on Tuesday night.

    Anyone with information regarding either Largay or the unknown female hiker is asked to call Augusta Public Safety Dispatch at 1-800-452-4664.

    Read more: St. John Valley Times - Search continues for Geraldine Largay

  4. #4
    Senior Member raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    'The uncertainty is the toughest part,' missing AT hiker's husband says
    George Largay, home in Tennessee, tries to figure out what to do next in wake of Geraldine Largay's July disappearance from Appalachian Trail in Franklin County


    http://www.onlinesentinel.com/news/T...band-says.html

    The last morning that George Largay saw his wife, they bid farewell as she set out for a three-day hike on a treacherous stretch of the Appalachian Trail in Maine.

    This photograph, posted to Geraldine Largay's Facebook page in April, shows George and Geraldine Largay at the Ramsey Cascades in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which straddles the borders of Tennessee and North Carolina. "She loved camping. She loved outdoors," George Largay said today of his wife, who disappeared from the Appalachian Trail in Franklin County last month.

    The goodbyes had become routine for the Brentwood couple. Geraldine Largay, known as Gerry, was in the final weeks of a 1,165-mile trek along the northern half of the trail. Since she began the journey in April, he had followed her along the way, meeting her at crossroads to replenish his wife's supplies.

    Hiking the trail was a lifelong dream for the 66-year-old retired nurse, and when she set out that Sunday morning, July 21, for 32-mile hike, she was a little more than 200 miles away from fulfilling it.

    "She loved camping. She loved outdoors," George Largay said in an interview today. "The ultimate hike for someone who really loves hiking as she does is the Appalachian Trail."

    Gerry carried her cellphone along, and throughout the trip she often sent text messages to her husband to let him know about her progress. Later that day, she messaged as she reached the peak of one of the first of several mountains on her three-day hike. The next day, July 22, she messaged again, this time saying she was heading toward her next stop, eight miles away.

    Largay was last reported by another hiker at the Spaulding Mountain lean-to on July 23, but wardens believe she never made it there.

    George Largay never heard from her again. When she didn't arrive at their meeting point on Tuesday evening, July 23, he figured she must have stopped because of the rain. By Wednesday, he contacted the authorities.

    Nearly three weeks have passed, during which an massive search effort across the area where she was last seen turned up no trace of evidence. After more than a week of searching, the Maine Warden Service scaled back its search to 4.2-square-miles of rough, mountainous terrain, but found no new evidence or information.

    Searches on Aug. 4 by 115 volunteers ? including wardens, dog teams, trained foot searchers and searchers on horseback ? was concentrated in 4.2 miles square between Lone Mountain and Mount Abrahm.

    The rugged, steep terrain, just off the trail in Franklin County, is rife with treacherous basins.

    Lt. Kevin Adam of the Maine Warden Service called the search for Largay mystifying, saying almost all hikers who disappear from the trail in Maine are found within a day.

    Last week, George Largay returned to Tennessee to try to figure out what to do next.

    "The uncertainty is the toughest part," he said. "Until they find Gerry, there's always the unknown, and that's almost tougher than the known."

    Today, he met with reporters at the Nashville offices of McNeely Pigott & Fox Public Relations to talk about his experience and his wife's legacy.

    "The more information that we can get out there that might help to an ultimate resolution to the whole situation, that's our main reason for being here today," he said. "If it helps in the whole process of finding her, that's great."

    While Largay is not giving up hope, his family is ready to move on. In October, they plan to have a memorial service for his wife, just outside of Atlanta, where they lived for many years.

    "I'm trying to do two things ? one is to focus on the positives, reminding myself that she was absolutely where she wanted to be, doing absolutely what she wanted to be doing with every fiber of her being," he said.

    Despite the tragedy, Largay wants his wife's life to serve as an inspiration for others.

    "She would want this to help inspire somebody who's maybe on the sidelines, and never thought about doing something like this at age 66, almost 67, to not hold back, just to really to go for it," he said. "Because she embraced life, and she would want anyone who reads about this to ? that this would serve as a reason to do it, or to do something else that they were thinking about, versus to sit on the sidelines and play safe."

    Largay too finds inspiration in his wife?s memory, and wants to find ways to keep her always in his thoughts.

    ?She was where she wanted to be,? he said. ?That?s easier said than done when you?ve been happily married for 42 years, and had visions of it being a lot longer than that. But she was following the dream, and I have to go with that.?

  5. #5
    Senior Member raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Search continues for missing AT hiker Geraldine Largay

    http://www.kjonline.com/news/Search-...ne-Largay.html

    A couple of dozen people plan to continue looking for missing Appalachian Trail hiker Geraldine Largay with the aid of search dogs in the coming weeks.

    George Largay and his wife, Geraldine, at the Ramsey Cascades in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which straddles the borders of Tennessee and North Carolina. Geraldine Largay has been missing since July from a portion of the Appalachian Trail between Route 4 near Rangeley and Route 27 in Wyman Township.


    Largay, 66, from Tennessee, was reported missing July 24 while hiking the Appalachian Trail from West Virginia to Maine. After a week of extensive searching, the Maine Warden Service scaled back the search but left the investigation open and welcomed any new leads.

    ?We will continue to search as long as we can reasonably believe that we can find something,? Cpl. John MacDonald said on Thursday, adding that any chance at closure for Largay?s family and friends is worth the search. ?It still hasn?t been too long, and if there is the likelihood that we can find something, we will search. That?s what we do.?

    While no new leads were reported, according to MacDonald, the search will pick up in a couple of weeks with about 25 searchers and some search dogs. The warden service also has put up posters at popular trails and hunting locations in the area, showing a photo of Largay and details about her and her disappearance.

    ?Every case is different, and we?re certainly not closing this one,? MacDonald said. ?As time goes on, we?ll continue searching, weather and schedule permitting.?

    The news of Largay?s disappearance has spread among hikers who continue to call or email wardens, MacDonald said.

    ?The hiking community is tightly knit, so I get the feeling that word about Largay has spread,? MacDonald said. ?Many hikers are more diligent, looking for anything that could help while they?re hiking.?

    MacDonald said dozens of them have called with potential tips, some of which have been helpful, while others prove to be fruitless.

    ?We?ve talked to people claming to see (Largay), and it wasn?t her,? MacDonald said.

    Largay?s last confirmed sighting, according to the warden service, was on July 22, when an unidentified female hiker took a picture of her at Poplar Ridge lean-to. MacDonald said the female hiker provided useful information that helped narrow Largay?s potential whereabouts, but he would not say anymore about the woman.

    He also said the warden service has contacted hiker Trevor Pike, whose father wrote in a blog that Pike had interacted with Largay, but he wouldn?t comment further.

    He said the information is kept confidential because of the ongoing missing-person investigation, which is typical during a search for a missing hiker.

    MacDonald also would not comment about the tip the warden service received about a hiker who reportedly stayed with Largay at the Spaulding Mountain lean-to the night before she was reported missing.

    ?We?re not naming who the caller is, because the information that she provided may have been interpreted incorrectly,? he said.

    MacDonald said in a previous email that the warden service knows Largay didn?t spend the night at the Spaulding lean-to before she disappeared.

    The posters have been placed throughout the region where Largay was hiking.

    ?Hunting season is coming up, and we want to get word out to those who haven?t heard about it yet,? MacDonald said.

    When Largay was reported missing, she was a day overdue for a meeting with her husband, George Largay, who had communicated with her throughout the trip via text messages and met her periodically to replenish her supplies. George Largay was planning to meet his wife July 23 in Wyman Township for supplies, but after a day passed with no sign of his wife, he reported her absence.

    MacDonald said Largay?s husband waited a day because the poor weather and the trail?s rough terrain prompted him to give her more time to show up.

    Largay started her hike in April, 950 miles south in West Virginia and was about 200 miles from the Appalachian Trail?s northern end, Mount Katahdin?s Baxter Peak, when she disappeared. The warden service said 98 percent of people reported missing are found within 48 hours.

    George Largay told the Tennessean newspaper in August that his family isn?t giving up hope but is moving on. Plans for a memorial service for his wife are set for Oct. 12 outside Atlanta, where the couple lived for many years, according to McNeely Pigott & Fox Public Relations. Largay has been a client of the firm for 15 years for business purposes, according to the company.

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    Senior Member Angiebla's Avatar
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    I don't mean to sound vulgar or harsh, but animals probably got to her body and there is nothing left. There are bears in that area, I sure as hell would not hike there alone.

    I want something good to die for, to make it beautiful to live.~Queens of the Stone Age

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    Senior Member raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    I don't mean to sound vulgar or harsh, but animals probably got to her body and there is nothing left. There are bears in that area, I sure as hell would not hike there alone.
    I totally think she is dead too! From what I have heard though (had a friend who was going to hike the length of the trail) it is quite populated, so I am just curious as to how no one could have seen something. I am inclined to think someone offed her as opposed to her just taking a fall and then dying somewhere. I think if the latter happened they would have found her body by now.

    I wouldn't hike alone either, but I have to admire her spunk in doing it...especially at her age. That's part of what keeps drawing me back to this story and hoping they find her.

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    Senior Member bermstalker's Avatar
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    From the updates, it says they have scaled back the search.

    Aug. 4 UPDATE: At the conclusion of today’s search efforts, the Maine Warden Service issued a statement that no new evidence or information has been found as to missing Appalachian Trail hiker Geraldine Largay's location. Therefore, the search will be extensively scaled back.
    http://www.sjvalley-times.com/view/f...homesecondleft

    Here is a pretty interesting facebook page. It is Maine's W&F and they post updates on all the missing on the trail.
    https://www.facebook.com/mainefishwi...51737226148609

    From everything I've read, it seems she was a very experienced hiker. I would think that's true for anybody that hikes the AT. The AT can be dangerous.
    'In the name of King David, I threw a piece of raw meat into the street in exchange for (giving) my husband to the wild rabid dogs,' (Jean Kasem)


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    a little ray of sunshine *crickets*'s Avatar
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    I hope this lady is OK but after this much time it's not looking good. The AT is not as safe as people would like to think...there were double murders along the AT in 1981 and 1991, plus this one in 2011:

    The hiker found murdered along the Appalachian Trial in Amherst County in June 2011 died of asphyxiation. That's according to investigators in the case, who have also revealed that 30-year-old Scott Lilly's body was buried after he was killed. FBI Agent Steven Duenas says they are very interested in talking to anyone that had come across any of Lilly's stuff, including a pair of brown and orange Ozark Trail hiking shoes. Officials announced a $10,000 reward for information about Lilly's death.
    of course, the AT is over 2,000 miles long so numbers-wise it's still pretty safe. Hiking alone is NOT recommended though.

    Every year there are people who hike the entire length of the AT, from GA to Maine, like this lady was trying to do. They're called thru-hikers. Why anyone would want to do this is beyond me. Sure there are parts that are gorgeous, with incredible views, but a lot of it is slogging thru the woods for days on end...rain or shine. And it can rain for days. Imagine going to sleep damp (on the ground!) and waking up damp every day for a few days. UGHHH.

    I live right by the AT and have hiked several sections, and it's always entertaining running into thru-hikers. They're pretty easy to spot, bedraggled but determined, (and, um...fragrant) and interesting to chat with. Colorful.

    There are old cabins scattered along the trail and each one has a guestbook for passersby to sign and record their observations. That's where I got the rain stories from, comments like "does it ever stop raining here" and "I never knew it was possible to be so wet for so long."
    Last edited by *crickets*; 10-09-2013 at 12:23 PM.

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    Senior Member bermstalker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by *crickets* View Post
    I hope this lady is OK but after this much time it's not looking good. The AT is not as safe as people would like to think...there were double murders along the AT in 1981 and 1991, plus this one in 2011:


    of course, the AT is over 2,000 miles long so numbers-wise it's still pretty safe. Hiking alone is NOT recommended though.

    Every year there are people who hike the entire length of the AT, from GA to Maine, like this lady was trying to do. They're called through-hikers. Why anyone would want to do this is beyond me. Sure there are parts that are gorgeous, with incredible views, but a lot of it is slogging thru the woods for days on end...rain or shine. And it can rain for days. Imagine going to sleep damp (on the ground!) and waking up damp for a few days. UGHHH.

    I live right by the AT and have hiked several sections, and it's always entertaining running into the through-hikers. They're pretty easy to spot, bedraggled but determined, (and, um...fragrant) and interesting to chat with. Colorful characters. There are old cabins scattered along the trail and each one has a guestbook for passersby to sign and record their observations. That's where I got the rain stories from, comments like "does it ever stop raining here" and "I never knew it was possible to be so wet for so long."

    IDK. In some strange way, I've always wanted to do the AT. The whole thing.

    I wouldn't do it alone, tho. There is a great documentary on Netflix about hiking the AT.
    'In the name of King David, I threw a piece of raw meat into the street in exchange for (giving) my husband to the wild rabid dogs,' (Jean Kasem)


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    Berm - what the name of that flick? I'd love to see it.

    The AT definitely has a certain allure to it. I would be beside myself to hike just a portion of it, let alone the whole thing. This story is so interesting to me because she was doing it alone but her husband was so supportive of her and meeting her at different spots. That's cool. Sad that she is probably dead, though.

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    Senior Member kevansvault's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bermstalker View Post
    IDK. In some strange way, I've always wanted to do the AT. The whole thing.

    I wouldn't do it alone, tho. There is a great documentary on Netflix about hiking the AT.
    My wife hiked many miles of the before we started dating. I always worried about the safety of shit like that though. She used to be big into the whole camping/hiking thing, a real outdoorsy kinda girl. That was something we never did together though, for one reason or another. Poor Mrs. Largay. I hope she is located safe, and soon.
    Don't like what I have to say? I respect that. Now go fuck yourself.

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    Moderator bowieluva's Avatar
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    My boyfriend's dad disappeared on the Pacific Crest trail. Presumed dead. Some people want to go out that way.

    You slept with mike so he would ban me. change your sig..the pretentious look how hipster face is so old ooh you like guys with glasses..ooooh

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    Senior Member kevansvault's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    My boyfriend's dad disappeared on the Pacific Crest trail. Presumed dead. Some people want to go out that way.
    Ack!! How long ago was that, bowie?
    Don't like what I have to say? I respect that. Now go fuck yourself.

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    Moderator bowieluva's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevansvault View Post
    Ack!! How long ago was that, bowie?
    I think about ten years ago. He'd been going on these 'explorations' for a while and a ranger would find him and bring him back, and then one day, they didn't find him.

    You slept with mike so he would ban me. change your sig..the pretentious look how hipster face is so old ooh you like guys with glasses..ooooh

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    Interesting, Bowie. Why did he always have to be "found and brought back."

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    fun hater Shins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elliss View Post
    Interesting, Bowie. Why did he always have to be "found and brought back."
    My thinking is that he didn't want to be found, but the rangers had to do their job and bring him back. Or something like that.

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    Moderator bowieluva's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elliss View Post
    Interesting, Bowie. Why did he always have to be "found and brought back."
    I don't think he cared to be found. He thought he could live off the land or something. We don't talk about it much as it's obviously a sensitive and emotional topic but there was a lot of mental illness involved.

    You slept with mike so he would ban me. change your sig..the pretentious look how hipster face is so old ooh you like guys with glasses..ooooh

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    Wow. Yeah, I can see why his family wouldn't want to discuss it. That's intense.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Angiebla's Avatar
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    21474840
    It's not looking too good for this lady.

    I want something good to die for, to make it beautiful to live.~Queens of the Stone Age

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