Page 24 of 24 FirstFirst ... 14 22 23 24
Results 576 to 584 of 584

Thread: The Death Penalty in action - issues updates and the ongoing debate

  1. #576
    Senior Member puzzld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    19,272
    Rep Power
    21474869
    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    I think this is a good way to look at the issue.

    I have been on both sides of the issue in my life, and done a complete 180. I was pro death penalty back when I was in LE, but over the years started changing my mind. Now I am very against it for many reasons: possibility of innocence, cost for death row inmates is much higher than life in prison inmates, barbaricness of it.

    When I lived in TX and was transitioning my viewpoint, I was talking with a bunch of coworkers about it and brought up the fact that if you support the death penalty you should be willing to advocate for death if your brother or mother was accused of a Capital Murder. They all got really mad and said "you can't bring family into this". That's the point though, you have to think about it like that in my mind, or you're a HUGE hypocrite. If it's good enough for every one else, then it's good enough for you and your family. I think looking at it from the victim's family viewpoint it also important...would you be willing to ask for no death penalty if your loved one was killed and you had been against the DP in the past?

    I actually think we would be a lot better off as a nation if we would look at more things (abortion, immigration, etc) in this manner, but we as a nation want to pretend that it only happens to other people and doesn't affect us, so as a nation we develop very set in stone viewpoints on things we don't fully understand or think is beneath us.
    It's just so pointless. The Ted Bundy's of the world are obviously not deterred by the possibility of the dp. And if it's not about deterrence, what's the point? Vengeance? We keep someone on ice for 16 years and then we put them to sleep? That doesn't seem very satisfactory to me. We spend a ton of money and for what.

    If we want to reduce crime we need to find a way to deal with the causes. If we want vengeance, give the victims survivors the power to determine the punishment. (not practical, but...)
    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    lol at Nestle being some vicious smiter, she's the nicest person on this site besides probably puzzld. Or at least the last person to resort to smiting.
    Quote Originally Posted by nestlequikie View Post
    Why on earth would I smite you when I can ban you?

  2. #577
    Senior Member Queena's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Illinois but the Southern part, which kind of sucks
    Posts
    2,544
    Rep Power
    21474846
    I agree with all of your points Puzzld and RBW. I take no pleasure in most deaths. Sure there are some that I do not feel sorry for, but if given the chance, I wouldn't kill anyone. Legally or illegally. I think back to the guy in Texas who was killed, and they used faulty science (it was a fire). Think about the people because of teeth marks. Or those who are only there based on eyewitnesses. It's such a slippery slope and I don't think that you can ever be 100% sure. I remember one guy who said that he was innocent right up until the very last moment. Years later DNA test says that he was guilty. Let's just do away with the dp and let them rot in prison.

  3. #578
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    4,073
    Rep Power
    6720189
    Quote Originally Posted by Queena View Post
    I agree with all of your points Puzzld and RBW. I take no pleasure in most deaths. Sure there are some that I do not feel sorry for, but if given the chance, I wouldn't kill anyone. Legally or illegally. I think back to the guy in Texas who was killed, and they used faulty science (it was a fire). Think about the people because of teeth marks. Or those who are only there based on eyewitnesses. It's such a slippery slope and I don't think that you can ever be 100% sure. I remember one guy who said that he was innocent right up until the very last moment. Years later DNA test says that he was guilty. Let's just do away with the dp and let them rot in prison.
    I agree too in Theory but I doubt it would be in practice. Every time I read an article or petition of a men convicted or on trial for killing rapists. Hint it starts with the victim deserved to die because they are rapists and child molesters they do not deserve a murder investigation and a waste of tax payer dollars to investigate vigilantes who kill predators. Yes this end with if the death penalty was applied then you are part of the conspiracy to "Blame the Hero". And some of the commentators especially on James Fairbanks and Jay Maynor petition would take the joy that the person killed a "Disgusting person" and the killer took the Trash out and the person needs to be free immediately the point is people are against the death penalty if the people think that a certain type of murderer will make their neighborhood safe IE Police and vigilantes. Umm have anybody outside of known Filipino neighborhoods heard of President Duterte of the Philippines? He kills criminals and he ended up insane and paranoid in office once he is away from the cameras and the tough guy image wears off.

    https://news.abs-cbn.com/halalan2016...ist-kidnappers

    MANILA - Killing criminals who commit heinous crimes is not a crime, especially if they are armed and resist arrest, at least for presidential aspirant Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte.

    In an interview on radio dzMM's "Ikaw Na Ba? Para Sa Pamilyang Pilipino" Wednesday, Duterte admitted that he has actively participated in the execution of several criminals in his city ever since he was elected mayor.

    "Ay susmaryosep, marami na," said Duterte, who was first elected mayor of Davao City in 1988.

    Duterte, who filed his certificate of candidacy (COC) for president under the Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan (PDP-Laban) replacing Martin Di?o, again recalled during the interview the instance when he shot to death three men who abducted a Chinese girl.

    He said he was just three months into his first term as mayor in 1988 when the suspects kidnapped a girl and brought her to a neighboring province where they repeatedly raped her, before they went back to Davao City supposedly to get the ransom money from the victim's family.

    Duterte, accompanied by three men, said that after he was assured that the victim had already been safely secured, he did not think twice about shooting the kidnappers, who, he said, were holding carbines.

    undefined
    "Hinintay ko na lang. Nung bumaba sila, wala na ako, basta pinagbabaril ko na lang. May hawak na carbine e," he said.

    "I was part of it," he admitted. "Actually, I was the most active kasi nakaubos ako ng dalawang magazine ng .45."

    He said they were then able to retrieve the ransom money, which, he said, was smeared with blood.

    In the interview, Duterte said he does not believe his act of killing the three rapist-kidnappers can be considered a crime.

    "Hindi crime yun because they were committing a crime in my presence and I was the person in authority under the law...Pagsabi ko 'Taas ang kamay', walang tumaas ng kamay. Binira ko na," he said.

    OTHER INCIDENTS

    He also recalled how he shot "at a distance" suspects in the kidnapping of the wife of a landed gentry in Davao.

    He said the suspects were stopped at a police checkpoint after the kidnap victim's spouse spotted them.

    "Ako, I took a shot. Maybe pam-practice rin, kung makatama," he said.

    Duterte was also asked if reports that he killed a drug dealer by dropping him from a helicopter are true.

    Duterte was initially silent for a few seconds before saying: "Wala naman nakatingin noon."

    READ: Duterte warns outlaws: 'I can eat your heart in front of you'

    READ: Enrile: Duterte challenging roughness, smoothness of PH society

    'SARCASM'

    Despite his admission, the tough-talking mayor said he is not in favor of extrajudicial killings "in the sense na yung nakatali yung kamay sa likod tapos nakaluhod."

    "Ayaw kasi maniwala ng tao, pati yung [Commission of] Human Rights, na itong mga kriminal, may armas ito. Most of them, if not all, pagdating niyan may armas talaga yan, lumalaban yan. And that is really the insanity caused by drugs," he stressed.

    "At ang sinasabi ko naman sa mga pulis, 'Palabanin mo. Please naman, lumaban ka, kriminal, para mapatay ka na namin,'" he said.

    The 70-year-old mayor also said it was "pure sarcasm" when he said he had already executed a total of 1,700 people.

    Speaking to reporters at the Commission on Elections (Comelec) Tuesday, Duterte said: "700 daw ang pinatay ko? Nagkulang ho sila sa kwenta... Mga 1,700."

    "That's pure sarcasm," he said in the dzMM interview. "Parang binabastos mo ako eh, 700, eh saan yung death certificates? Ipakita mo nga. Pati yung malaria diyan na bumagsak, sa akin."



    He, however, did not deny that there were cases of extra-judicial killings in Davao, especially during the martial law period, when there was a "war" between the government and the New People's Army (NPA).

    "We used to lose about, on the average, 3 to 5 soldiers a day sa Davao," he said.

    "Kaya yang death squad na yan, nadagdagan na nga ng 'D,' naging DDS. During my time, since it was repeatedly used against me, pulitika, 'Sige, I accept it, totoo yang DDS.' May spin. That is what I used, Davao Development System. O, nakita mo, maganda na tayo."

    READ: Duterte backtracks on death squad 'admission'

    Asked how many he has actually killed, he just said: "Yung iba, baka sa panaginip ko lang."

    The Human Rights Watch earlier denounced the more than 1,000 killings committed by the so-called Davao Death Squad (DDS) since the late 1990s.

    Amnesty International (AI) Philippines has likewise said it is "bothered" by the presidential candidacy of Duterte. "Yes, we are bothered. Naaalarma kami when he said that when he becomes president, he will impose the death penalty on a weekly basis," AI Philippines chairperson Ritz Lee Santos said.

    'BAKIT AKO MATATAKOT?'


    Duterte, who has time and again warned lawbreakers, especially drug traffickers, not to go to his city or else they will be killed, said he is not afraid of any criminal.

    "Bakit ako matatakot? Sila yung masama, ako yung nagsasabi sa kanila na gobyerno ito, tumahimik sila."

    According to Duterte, he will also not think twice about killing members of the police force when they commit any "wrongdoing."

    He cited two separate instances when cops involved in kidnapping incidents in Davao ended up dead.

    "Sinasabi ko sa mga pulis, 'Pag gumawa kayo ng masama, mauuna talaga kayo. You have to go first,'" he said.

    Duterte, meanwhile, admitted that there are still many incidents of crime in Davao. But, he said, "As long as yung namatay, yung dapat mamatay. In protecting the community... I do not care if we were the highest in the country, kung lahat naman ng napatay diyan eh kriminal, eh di maligaya ako."

    The mayor said he is in favor of restoring the death penalty, especially for drug-related and other heinous crimes.

    "There are about 1,000 pwedeng i-execute, dapat i-execute but because it was put off maybe because of the strongest influence of libertarians in the Church, the previous president decided not just to implement it," he said.


    https://www.change.org/p/kay-ivey-an...ghter-s-rapist


    https://www.change.org/p/jail-for-ge...endez-brothers

    https://www.change.org/p/leslie-abra...endez-brothers

    https://www.change.org/p/donald-j-tr...redirect=false

    https://www.change.org/p/louisiana-s...-brittany-monk

    https://www.change.org/p/parole-boar...robertmaudsley

    https://www.change.org/p/the-british...hile-locked-up

  4. #579
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    4,073
    Rep Power
    6720189
    Quote Originally Posted by Queena View Post
    I agree with all of your points Puzzld and RBW. I take no pleasure in most deaths. Sure there are some that I do not feel sorry for, but if given the chance, I wouldn't kill anyone. Legally or illegally. I think back to the guy in Texas who was killed, and they used faulty science (it was a fire). Think about the people because of teeth marks. Or those who are only there based on eyewitnesses. It's such a slippery slope and I don't think that you can ever be 100% sure. I remember one guy who said that he was innocent right up until the very last moment. Years later DNA test says that he was guilty. Let's just do away with the dp and let them rot in prison.
    I agree too in Theory but I doubt it would be in practice. Every time I read an article or petition of a men convicted or on trial for killing rapists. Hint it starts with the victim deserved to die because they are rapists and child molesters they do not deserve a murder investigation and a waste of tax payer dollars to investigate vigilantes who kill predators. Yes this end with if the death penalty was applied then you are part of the conspiracy to "Blame the Hero". And some of the commentators especially on James Fairbanks and Jay Maynor petition would take the joy that the person killed a "Disgusting person" and the killer took the Trash out and the person needs to be free immediately the point is people are against the death penalty if the people think that a certain type of murderer will make their neighborhood safe IE Police and vigilantes. Umm have anybody outside of known Filipino neighborhoods heard of President Duterte of the Philippines? He kills criminals and he ended up insane and paranoid in office once he is away from the cameras and the tough guy image wears off.

    https://news.abs-cbn.com/halalan2016...ist-kidnappers

    MANILA - Killing criminals who commit heinous crimes is not a crime, especially if they are armed and resist arrest, at least for presidential aspirant Davao City Mayor Rodrigo Duterte.

    In an interview on radio dzMM's "Ikaw Na Ba? Para Sa Pamilyang Pilipino" Wednesday, Duterte admitted that he has actively participated in the execution of several criminals in his city ever since he was elected mayor.

    "Ay susmaryosep, marami na," said Duterte, who was first elected mayor of Davao City in 1988.

    Duterte, who filed his certificate of candidacy (COC) for president under the Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan (PDP-Laban) replacing Martin Di?o, again recalled during the interview the instance when he shot to death three men who abducted a Chinese girl.

    He said he was just three months into his first term as mayor in 1988 when the suspects kidnapped a girl and brought her to a neighboring province where they repeatedly raped her, before they went back to Davao City supposedly to get the ransom money from the victim's family.

    Duterte, accompanied by three men, said that after he was assured that the victim had already been safely secured, he did not think twice about shooting the kidnappers, who, he said, were holding carbines.

    undefined
    "Hinintay ko na lang. Nung bumaba sila, wala na ako, basta pinagbabaril ko na lang. May hawak na carbine e," he said.

    "I was part of it," he admitted. "Actually, I was the most active kasi nakaubos ako ng dalawang magazine ng .45."

    He said they were then able to retrieve the ransom money, which, he said, was smeared with blood.

    In the interview, Duterte said he does not believe his act of killing the three rapist-kidnappers can be considered a crime.

    "Hindi crime yun because they were committing a crime in my presence and I was the person in authority under the law...Pagsabi ko 'Taas ang kamay', walang tumaas ng kamay. Binira ko na," he said.

    OTHER INCIDENTS

    He also recalled how he shot "at a distance" suspects in the kidnapping of the wife of a landed gentry in Davao.

    He said the suspects were stopped at a police checkpoint after the kidnap victim's spouse spotted them.

    "Ako, I took a shot. Maybe pam-practice rin, kung makatama," he said.

    Duterte was also asked if reports that he killed a drug dealer by dropping him from a helicopter are true.

    Duterte was initially silent for a few seconds before saying: "Wala naman nakatingin noon."

    READ: Duterte warns outlaws: 'I can eat your heart in front of you'

    READ: Enrile: Duterte challenging roughness, smoothness of PH society

    'SARCASM'

    Despite his admission, the tough-talking mayor said he is not in favor of extrajudicial killings "in the sense na yung nakatali yung kamay sa likod tapos nakaluhod."

    "Ayaw kasi maniwala ng tao, pati yung [Commission of] Human Rights, na itong mga kriminal, may armas ito. Most of them, if not all, pagdating niyan may armas talaga yan, lumalaban yan. And that is really the insanity caused by drugs," he stressed.

    "At ang sinasabi ko naman sa mga pulis, 'Palabanin mo. Please naman, lumaban ka, kriminal, para mapatay ka na namin,'" he said.

    The 70-year-old mayor also said it was "pure sarcasm" when he said he had already executed a total of 1,700 people.

    Speaking to reporters at the Commission on Elections (Comelec) Tuesday, Duterte said: "700 daw ang pinatay ko? Nagkulang ho sila sa kwenta... Mga 1,700."

    "That's pure sarcasm," he said in the dzMM interview. "Parang binabastos mo ako eh, 700, eh saan yung death certificates? Ipakita mo nga. Pati yung malaria diyan na bumagsak, sa akin."



    He, however, did not deny that there were cases of extra-judicial killings in Davao, especially during the martial law period, when there was a "war" between the government and the New People's Army (NPA).

    "We used to lose about, on the average, 3 to 5 soldiers a day sa Davao," he said.

    "Kaya yang death squad na yan, nadagdagan na nga ng 'D,' naging DDS. During my time, since it was repeatedly used against me, pulitika, 'Sige, I accept it, totoo yang DDS.' May spin. That is what I used, Davao Development System. O, nakita mo, maganda na tayo."

    READ: Duterte backtracks on death squad 'admission'

    Asked how many he has actually killed, he just said: "Yung iba, baka sa panaginip ko lang."

    The Human Rights Watch earlier denounced the more than 1,000 killings committed by the so-called Davao Death Squad (DDS) since the late 1990s.

    Amnesty International (AI) Philippines has likewise said it is "bothered" by the presidential candidacy of Duterte. "Yes, we are bothered. Naaalarma kami when he said that when he becomes president, he will impose the death penalty on a weekly basis," AI Philippines chairperson Ritz Lee Santos said.

    'BAKIT AKO MATATAKOT?'


    Duterte, who has time and again warned lawbreakers, especially drug traffickers, not to go to his city or else they will be killed, said he is not afraid of any criminal.

    "Bakit ako matatakot? Sila yung masama, ako yung nagsasabi sa kanila na gobyerno ito, tumahimik sila."

    According to Duterte, he will also not think twice about killing members of the police force when they commit any "wrongdoing."

    He cited two separate instances when cops involved in kidnapping incidents in Davao ended up dead.

    "Sinasabi ko sa mga pulis, 'Pag gumawa kayo ng masama, mauuna talaga kayo. You have to go first,'" he said.

    Duterte, meanwhile, admitted that there are still many incidents of crime in Davao. But, he said, "As long as yung namatay, yung dapat mamatay. In protecting the community... I do not care if we were the highest in the country, kung lahat naman ng napatay diyan eh kriminal, eh di maligaya ako."

    The mayor said he is in favor of restoring the death penalty, especially for drug-related and other heinous crimes.

    "There are about 1,000 pwedeng i-execute, dapat i-execute but because it was put off maybe because of the strongest influence of libertarians in the Church, the previous president decided not just to implement it," he said.


    https://www.change.org/p/kay-ivey-an...ghter-s-rapist


    https://www.change.org/p/jail-for-ge...endez-brothers

    https://www.change.org/p/leslie-abra...endez-brothers

    https://www.change.org/p/donald-j-tr...redirect=false

    https://www.change.org/p/louisiana-s...-brittany-monk

    https://www.change.org/p/parole-boar...robertmaudsley

    https://www.change.org/p/the-british...hile-locked-up

  5. #580
    Senior Member Queena's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Illinois but the Southern part, which kind of sucks
    Posts
    2,544
    Rep Power
    21474846
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnLanders View Post
    I agree too in Theory but I doubt it would be in practice. Every time I read an article or petition of a men convicted or on trial for killing rapists. Hint it starts with the victim deserved to die because they are rapists and child molesters they do not deserve a murder investigation and a waste of tax payer dollars to investigate vigilantes who kill predators. Yes this end with if the death penalty was applied then you are part of the conspiracy to "Blame the Hero". And some of the commentators especially on James Fairbanks and Jay Maynor petition would take the joy that the person killed a "Disgusting person" and the killer took the Trash out and the person needs to be free immediately the point is people are against the death penalty if the people think that a certain type of murderer will make their neighborhood safe IE Police and vigilantes. Umm have anybody outside of known Filipino neighborhoods heard of President Duterte of the Philippines? He kills criminals and he ended up insane and paranoid in office once he is away from the cameras and the tough guy image wears off.

    https://news.abs-cbn.com/halalan2016...ist-kidnappers





    https://www.change.org/p/kay-ivey-an...ghter-s-rapist


    https://www.change.org/p/jail-for-ge...endez-brothers

    https://www.change.org/p/leslie-abra...endez-brothers

    https://www.change.org/p/donald-j-tr...redirect=false

    https://www.change.org/p/louisiana-s...-brittany-monk

    https://www.change.org/p/parole-boar...robertmaudsley

    https://www.change.org/p/the-british...hile-locked-up
    I wish I could fix the child abuse and molestation problem. I think that those things are passed down. Hurt people hurt people. Some are just sick and I always say that I would kill anyone who touched my son. That's because I've seen boys who were molested go on to become the molester. It's a sickness. A disease. I'm not sure if killing them vigilananty style is the answer. They rarely give the dp for molestation, they usually only reserve it for murder. It's as if the lasting pain that the victim feels doesn't matter.

  6. #581
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    4,073
    Rep Power
    6720189
    https://slate.com/news-and-politics/...xecutions.html

    The Trump administration on Friday dramatically expanded the federal government’s ability to carry out the death penalty and use archaic methods of execution that would prove to be a national embarrassment if used in Trump’s waning days as president.

    At a time when every other constitutional democracy and many religious faiths have condemned capital punishment because of its cruel assault on human dignity, Trump and his cronies have again thumbed their noses at the world and at common decency.

    The new rule is worded with deceptive simplicity: “Federal executions are to be carried out by lethal injection or by any other manner prescribed by the law of the State in which the sentence was imposed.” Behind this bureaucratic prose hides a stark fact: In our supposedly civilized nation, the federal government now will be able to hang, electrocute, gas, or shoot individuals if it does not want to kill them by lethal injection.


    While lethal injection is by no means an execution panacea, Trump and his minions have embraced outdated ways of carrying out death sentences. They have revived them almost entirely for their symbolic value rather than their need to use them in the unlikely event something goes awry with the lethal injection protocol. But, practically speaking, nothing now stands in the way of the federal government’s plan to put people to death by a single dose of pentobarbital.

    The Trump administration is cruelly taking advantage of the fact that this country’s 22 remaining death penalty states, because they have had real difficulties obtaining lethal injection drugs, have kept older methods on the books as a last resort.

    Today, nine Southern and border states prescribe death by electrocution as an alternative method of execution. Six states authorize execution by gas, and the firing squad is the alternative in three more. Remarkably, three states—Delaware, New Hampshire, and Washington—still allow for death by hanging if lethal injection is unavailable or impractical.

    Until Friday’s change to federal law, Mississippi and Oklahoma were the most permissive, authorizing electrocution, gas, and the firing squad in addition to lethal injection. Now the federal government, which represents all Americans, has outdone even those death belt bastions in its promiscuous embrace of execution methods.

    Its decision reveals two remarkable things about America’s death penalty.

    First, while most nations that still use capital punishment historically have employed only a single method of execution, over the last century the United States has added one method to another until today, when we have the full range that the Trump administration has embraced.

    Second, neither our laws nor our Constitution has prompted these developments. In fact, while a few state courts have struck down one of their state’s methods of execution, the United States Supreme Court has never imposed a nationwide ban on any method of execution. Dating back to the late 19th century, it has approved the firing squad, the electric chair, and lethal injection, while other federal appellate courts have sanctioned hanging.

    In fact, throughout most of our history, hanging was the primary method of execution. The first instance occurred in 1622 in Virginia to punish a cattle thief, and from then until now several different hanging methods have been tried. None of them has proven foolproof, and many have been botched, with a slow death frequently caused by strangulation, accompanied by convulsions, defecation, and protruding eyes and tongue.
    Slate is now hosting virtual events. Be the first to find out when and how to join.



    At the end of the 19th century, critics of hanging proposed replacing it with the electric chair, which they claimed was less painful than hanging. First introduced in New York, the electric chair became the iconic image of execution in the United States and epitomized the modern approach until the late 20th century.

    Death by electrocution is largely the same today as it was then. The condemned is strapped to a wooden chair, and a metal cap connected to electrodes is placed on his/her head. Thirty-second jolts of between 500 and 2,000 volts are then applied multiple times, with executioners checking for a heartbeat in between. The process repeats until the prisoner is dead.

    But, like hanging, electrocution has proved to be far from reliable. Even when the process is done correctly, it is brutal, with the prisoner convulsing, swelling, and defecating.

    Another alternative to the noose, the firing squad, became common in Utah in the middle of the 19th century, as well as in the U.S. military. Typically, the condemned is hooded and strapped to a chair; a white cloth is pinned over the heart. Five (or sometimes eight) shooters line up, with between one and three of them firing blanks. All shooters shoot simultaneously, aiming at the heart.

    Lethal gas, also an allegedly humane execution method, was first adopted by Nevada in 1922. The condemned is seated in an airtight room, and hydrogen cyanide gas is pumped into the room. He is supposed to lose consciousness and die painlessly; however, witnesses have often reported evidence of extreme pain, with eyes popping and skin turning purple. The gas chamber notably fell out of favor after World War II, when gassing became associated with the Holocaust, but it persisted in some cases and was last used in 1999.

    Almost 50 years ago, Oklahoma led the way in putting lethal injection, today’s preferred execution method, on the books.

    Although it carries with it the appearance of medical efficiency, this method has turned out to be the most problematic of all of America’s execution technologies. Since its introduction, more than 7 percent of all lethal injections have been botched.
    Popular in News & Politics

    The story of execution methods in the United States is one of conflict between modern notions of humaneness and the desire to keep the machinery of death running. The state has attempted to reconcile this conflict through the constant reinvention and technological modernization of the execution apparatus, even as it has retained previously discredited execution methods of the kind the Trump administration now is ready to use.

    Today it is unclear if any of the 54 people on the federal death row will actually be hanged, electrocuted, gassed, or shot, but Friday’s new regulation is sure to terrify them and remind them of their current government’s cruelty. For the rest of us, it is another reminder of the lengths to which Trump will go to take America down the low road, to flout our ideals, and to embarrass us in front of the world. And for what?

    The death penalty makes none of us any safer, and it perpetuates forms of racial discrimination that elsewhere mark our criminal justice system. One can only hope that the government’s desire to kill as many people as it can, and by any means necessary, will cause the Biden administration to end the federal death penalty, and to provide leadership and energy to see its abolition entirely in the United States.

  7. #582
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    4,073
    Rep Power
    6720189
    https://www.vox.com/21736993/trump-f...ution-december

    Donald Trump death penalty is playing the Martial Law card









    When five Black and Latino teenagers were wrongfully convicted of the rape of a jogger in New York City’s Central Park in 1989, prominent businessman Donald Trump bought newspaper advertisements calling on New York state to “bring back the death penalty” in the wake of the attack. Little did the country know, Trump’s views on capital punishment then would inform his presidency decades later: In July, the Trump administration reinstated the death penalty at the federal level after a 17-year hiatus.

    The return of federal executions demonstrates an unprecedented and grim picture of Trump’s legacy in contrast to previous administrations. The Washington Post’s editorial board described it as a “sickening spree of executions.” To put it in perspective, only three people had been executed by the federal government in the past 50 years. Meanwhile, in less than five months, eight people have already been put to death by Trump’s Justice Department, with five more executions scheduled to happen before Trump leaves office.

    “The Trump administration’s policy regarding a death penalty is just historically abhorrent,” said Robert Dunham, executive director of Death Penalty Information Center, a bipartisan organization that does not take a position for or against the death penalty, but rather is critical of the way capital punishment is administered.

    If the remaining executions in December are carried out — making a total of 10 for 2020 — it will mark more civilian executions in a single calendar year than any other presidency in the 20th and 21st centuries. “No one has conducted this number of federal civilian executions in this short period of time in American history,” Dunham added.

    Of the five upcoming federal executions during the lame-duck period, four of them are Black men, while the fifth will be the first woman to be executed by the federal government in nearly 70 years. These federal executions come in concert with the rallying cry for racial justice and an overhaul of America’s policing and criminal justice systems that has left a disproportionate number of Black people arrested, jailed, convicted, and dead. More than 44 percent of the remaining 54 people on federal death row are Black, according to the Death Penalty Information Center, even though Black people make up only 13 percent of the US population. “The fact that we’re having a record-high number of federal executions, at the same time that we’re near a record low in state executions, in the middle of a pandemic, shows how much the Trump administration is either out of touch or that it cannot resist gratuitous acts of cruelty,” Dunham said, adding that only seven state executions will occur this year — the lowest since states began carrying out executions in colonial times. “Nobody needs to carry out an execution during a pandemic.”

    Just last week, the Justice Department also published a rule that would allow other methods for capital punishment, such as firing squads, lethal gas, and electrocutions; Attorney General Bill Barr is currently racing to finalize that rule.

    Trump’s push for additional methods and a number of federal executions will be part of his presidential legacy and highlights a stark divide between the administration’s actions and dwindling support for the death penalty among Americans.
    Four Black men are scheduled for federal execution weeks before Trump leaves office

    On November 19, Orlando Hall, a Black man sentenced to death for kidnapping, rape, and murder in 1994, became the eighth and latest inmate to be executed by the federal government since it reinstated federal executions this summer. He is also the first in more than a century to be put to death during a lame-duck period. Shortly before Hall was executed by lethal injection, the US Supreme Court had denied his request to stop the execution — with new Justice Amy Coney Barrett joining the majority ruling.

    While Hall is the second Black man to be executed out of the eight so far since July, the remaining men scheduled to be put to death are all Black. “In an apparent effort to forestall criticism that the federal executions were racist, the administration selected white prisoners first,” Dunham said; the executions were reinstated as racial justice protests broke out across the country this summer. “What’s striking about that, though, is that it still tells us a lot about whose lives matter because only one of the people executed so far was convicted for killing an African American.”

  8. #583
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    4,073
    Rep Power
    6720189







    Apparently the Trumps are running executions before he leaves office. But its going to end up in a dictatorial way though.

  9. #584
    Senior Member JohnLanders's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    4,073
    Rep Power
    6720189
    https://fox40.com/news/national-and-...-put-to-death/

    TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (NewsNation Now) — A Louisiana truck driver who severely abused his 2-year-old daughter for weeks in 2002, then killed her by slamming her head repeatedly against a truck’s windows and dashboard, was put to death Friday night in the second federal execution carried out this week.

    Alfred Bourgeois, 56, was pronounced dead at 8:21 p.m. Eastern time at a federal prison in Terre Haute, Indiana. His lawyers had argued he had an IQ that put him in the intellectually disabled category, saying that should have made him ineligible for the death penalty.

    In his last words, Bourgeois, strapped to a gurney, offered no apology and instead struck a deeply defiant tone, insisting that he neither killed nor sexually abused his baby girl.

    “I ask God to forgive all those who plotted and schemed against me, and planted false evidence,” he said. He added: “I did not commit this crime.”

    Later, the girl’s relatives released a joint statement calling Bourgeois “a monster.”

    “None of us thought she would return from (visiting Bourgeois) in a casket,” it said. “It should not have taken 18 years to receive justice for our angel.”

    Bourgeois was the 10th federal death-row inmate put to death since federal executions resumed under President Donald Trump in July after a 17-year hiatus. He was the second federal prisoner executed this week, with three more executions planned in January.

    Bourgeois met with his spiritual adviser Friday as he sought to come to terms with the possibility of dying, and he was also praying, one of his lawyers, Shawn Nolan told The Associated Press just hours before the scheduled execution.

    “He certainly doesn’t want to die — and it’s harder for him to grasp being killed by the federal government. But he does get it that this is bad.”

    The attorney added: “He’s praying for redemption.”

    Bourgeois took up drawing in prison, including doing renditions of members of his legal team. Nolan said he hasn’t been a troublemaker on death row and has a good disciplinary record.

    The last time the number of civilians executed federally was in the double digits in a year was under President Grover Cleveland, with 14 in 1896.

    The series of executions after Election Day, the first in late November, is the first time in over 130 years where federal executions have occurred during a lame-duck period.

    Bourgeois’ lawyers contend that the apparent hurry by the Republican president to get executions in before the Jan. 20 inauguration of death-penalty foe Joe Biden, a Democrat, has deprived their client his rights to exhaust his legal options.

    The Justice Department gave Bourgeois 21 days notice he was to be executed under protocols that slashed the required notice period from 90 days, Nolan said.

    “It is remarkable. To rush these executions during the pandemic and everything else, makes absolutely no sense,” he said.

    Several appeals courts have concluded that neither evidence nor criminal law on intellectual disability support the claims by Bourgeois’ legal team.

    On Thursday, Brandon Bernard was put to death for his part in a 1999 killing of a religious couple from Iowa after he and other teenage members of a street gang abducted and robbed Todd and Stacie Bagley in Texas. Bernard, who was 18 at the time of the killings, was a rare execution of a person who was in his teens when his crime was committed.

    Several high-profile figures, including reality TV star Kim Kardashian West, appealed to Trump to commute Bernard’s sentence to life in prison, citing, among other things, Bernard’s youth at the time and the remorse he has expressed over years.

    US carries out execution of Brandon Bernard
    In Bourgeois’ case, the crimes stand out as particularly brutal because they involved his young daughter.

    According to court filings, he gained temporary custody of the child, referred to in court papers only as “JG,” after a 2002 paternity suit from a Texas woman. Bourgeois was living in Louisiana at the time with his wife and their two children.

    Over the next month, Bourgeois whipped the girl with an electrical cord, burned her feet with a cigarette lighter and hit her in the head with a plastic baseball bat so hard that her head swelled — then refused to seek medical treatment for her, court documents say. Prosecutors also said he sexually abused her.

    Her toilet training allegedly enraged Bourgeois and he would sometimes force her to sleep on a training toilet.

    It was on a trucking run to Corpus Christi, Texas, when he took the toddler with him that he ended up killing her. Again angered by her toilet training, he grabbed her inside the truck by her shoulders and slammed her head on the windows and dashboard four times, court filings say. She died the next day in a hospital of brain injuries.

    When the girl lost consciousness, Bourgeois’ wife pleaded for him to get help and he told her to tell first responders that she was hurt falling from the truck. She died the next day in a hospital of brain injuries.

    After his 2004 conviction in federal court in southern Texas, a judge rejected claims stemming from his alleged intellectual disability, noting he did not receive a diagnosis until after he had been sentenced to death.

    “Up to that point, Bourgeois had lived a life which, in broad outlines, did not manifest gross intellectual deficiencies,” the court said.

    Attorneys argued that such findings stem from misunderstandings about disabilities. They said Bourgeois had tests that demonstrated his IQ was around 70, well below average, and that his childhood history buttressed their claims of his disability.

    Bourgeois’ lawyers are not arguing that he should have been acquitted or should not have been handed a stiff penalty, just that he can’t be executed, Nolan said.

    The nature of the crime has made it more difficult to garner any sympathy for Bourgeois, including from some judges who can allow the brutality of what happened to trump execution law, Nolan said.

    “But that’s not the way these things are supposed to be done,” he added. “Based on past Supreme Court decisions and (federal law), he should not be executed.”

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •