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Thread: Jodi Ann Arias shot and stabbed her ex-boyfriend Travis Alexander to death (Part II)

  1. #40126
    Senior Member TupeloHoney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by emmy_dreamy View Post
    I didn't know that you could even request prison leave. WTH..jail is the new summer camp.

    I think sometimes prisoners are allowed to attend funerals, but it's few and far between, and usually not dangerous crazy people. And I would assume it would have to be someone who exhibits good behavior, which she has not, iirc.

    It seems like her presence would be such a huge distraction that I don't know why the family would even want her there. Buuut, they all act like they have a few bats in their belfries, so I dunno.
    Quote Originally Posted by Not your business View Post
    I will out think the fucking pants off of you and you would thank me for helping you out of them.

  2. #40127
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    I hope I don't get killed for this 😉😄

    Detective reveals the eerie details of the infamous Jodie Arias murder case.

    NATHAN Mendes is still haunted by the 2008 murder of salesman Travis Alexander and the media spectacle that ensued.

    Alexander was a 30-year-old Mormon whose body was discovered in his shower by friends. He was stabbed nearly 30 times and shot in the head with a .25 caliber pistol,*Fox News*reports.

    His ex-girlfriend Jodi Arias, who insisted at the time two masked intruders attacked her and killed Alexander, was found guilty in 2013 of first-degree murder.

    Prosecutors said it was a premeditated act carried out in a rage after Alexander wanted to end their romance and later planned a trip to Mexico with another woman.

    Her trial stirred headlines for televising salacious evidence, along with shocking testimony depicting the couple?s stormy relationship.

    The slaying also inspired numerous books and TV specials and would also become the subject of a 2013 Lifetime film titled*Jodi Arias: Dirty Little Secret.

    And now for the first time, the former detective for Siskiyou County, California, who arrested Arias at her grandparents? home after it appeared she was on the move, is coming forward.

    He discusses his involvement in the explosive investigation and trial in the three-part limited series on Investigation Discovery (ID) titled*Jodi Arias: An American Murder Mystery.

    The special explores the death of Alexander and the subsequent legal circus as Arias was tried.

    Mendes told*Fox News*he?s hoping it will help audiences focus on Alexander instead of Arias.

    ?I think people should realise the whole thing is a travesty,? he said.

    ?As sad as it is, everybody focused on Jodi. Books are named Jodi Arias, shows have the name Jodi Arias. Taglines are Jodi Arias. It?s almost like we forgot Travis even existed in all of this. It became such a circus about Jodi.

    He discusses his involvement in the explosive investigation and trial in the three-part limited series on Investigation Discovery (ID) titled*Jodi Arias: An American Murder Mystery.

    The special explores the death of Alexander and the subsequent legal circus as Arias was tried.

    Mendes told*Fox News*he?s hoping it will help audiences focus on Alexander instead of Arias.

    ?I think people should realise the whole thing is a travesty,? he said.

    ?As sad as it is, everybody focused on Jodi. Books are named Jodi Arias, shows have the name Jodi Arias. Taglines are Jodi Arias. It?s almost like we forgot Travis even existed in all of this. It became such a circus about Jodi

    He discusses his involvement in the explosive investigation and trial in the three-part limited series on Investigation Discovery (ID) titled*Jodi Arias: An American Murder Mystery.

    The special explores the death of Alexander and the subsequent legal circus as Arias was tried.

    Mendes told*Fox News*he?s hoping it will help audiences focus on Alexander instead of Arias.

    ?I think people should realise the whole thing is a travesty,? he said.

    ?As sad as it is, everybody focused on Jodi. Books are named Jodi Arias, shows have the name Jodi Arias. Taglines are Jodi Arias. It?s almost like we forgot Travis even existed in all of this. It became such a circus about Jodi.

    ?And she shouldn?t be the headliner here. And hopefully, some people will get to see that other side and realise Travis was the victim here. Jodi made that decision, but we shouldn?t have ever highlighted her. Books and shows should be based on Travis Alexander, not Jodi Arias ? I think Travis and his family deserve that.?

    Still, Mendes admitted there was no denying Arias? strange behaviour after her former lover was savagely killed in his own Mesa, Arizona, home.

    ?The crime scene was such a mess,? he said.

    ?? But when I first came across Jodi and we arrested her at her grandparents? house, my initial impression of her was she didn?t seem concerned at all ? The whole case was bizarre. Especially her demeanour ? Even when we booked her, she wanted to make sure her hair looked OK ? Things like that*were not sitting well with a lot of us.

    ?She was almost more concerned about her image ? She didn?t have a concern for consequence or outcome ? Like for me, I wouldn?t care what my hair looked like if I was being arrested or what my picture is going to look like. To me, that was just weird.?

    In the show, Mendes shared how he observed Arias while she was being interrogated and the jaw-dropping behaviour that quickly followed.

    Arias, who was initially sobbing through a four-hour police interrogation,*dramatically changed her attitude*when the prosecutor left the room.

    She was seen talking to herself, laughing, singing, playing with a garbage can and doing a headstand against the wall.

    ?At the time, we were watching it from the next room,? recalled Mendes.

    ?She was trying to burn off stress. That was an indicator of stress. When people are put under a lot of stress that energy has to go somewhere, so you do see a lot of bizarre things in the interrogation room. She was just kind of rambling. But the whole yoga scene was a little strange to me. I?ve seen some strange things, but that?s up on the top.?

    During the trial, Arias attempted to depict herself as a physically and emotionally battered woman who was forced to satisfy the perverted demands of her lover.

    However, it was revealed in court Arias was willing to chronicle her sexual escapades with Alexander through photographs and recordings.

    ?I was a little surprised by the relationship that they had,? said Mendes.

    ?And the relationship she had with other men. Sexually. I know everybody has their private lives that they don?t share with other people. But that was the thing with Jodi. The world got to see it.

    ?For a lot of folks that was the first time they had seen someone?s sexual exploitations plastered all over the media. And that was shocking for a lot of people. You read about it and you certainly hear about it, but in her case, it was just put out there.?

    Mendes also revealed Arias? family, whom he described as ?hardworking? and ?normal,? were stunned by their daughter?s horrific actions.

    ?She has a great family,? he said. ?They were devastated. Absolutely devastated ? I know*kind of surreal to them as far as her grandparents and parents were concerned. It was like, ?You guys must have made a mistake.? That was their initial reaction. ?You have the wrong person.? And that?s normal behaviour from parents, family members. No one wants to think that their child, [or] grandchild, can do something that brutal to anybody.

    Still, Mendes claimed Arias had no intention of becoming a celebrity.

    ?I think unfortunately, she was sensationalised by the media and I think at some point, it just got addicting. And she kind of ran with it. I don?t know if she had any intentions of making it about her. [But] a spotlight was put on her and she became sensationalised. I think that?s just the way things went.

    ?And that?s what happens when the media a lot of times get involved. Everybody was just so shocked by what happened and then the trial became a circus. I don?t think anybody had any intentions of it. It just happened, going the way it did.?

    In 2015, Arias was sentenced to*life in prison without parole. Mendes is now a supervisory special agent for the Department of Justice.

    Mendes said Arias was motivated to kill.

    ?I think she just wasn?t willing to share him with anybody else,? he said.

    ?That?s my personal opinion. Just seeing the evidence and seeing what was transpired before Travis was killed.

    ?I think she had come to the realisation that Travis wasn?t going to settle down with her and that she wasn?t willing to share him with anyone else or have him date or marry anybody else. It had to be Jodi. I think that?s what prompted a lot of this. She wasn?t willing to let him go. It?s the old, ?If I can?t have you, nobody can.'"

    http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/rea...c020d753f7329b

    Preview of investigation / doco at link.

    Please don't kill me ☺

  3. #40128
    Senior Member Josephine's Avatar
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    Tl;dr version:


    Investigator: it is a travesty that all of these shows are called "Jodi Arias". They should be called "Travis Alexander".

    Also investigator: you should totes watch mah new show, it's called "Jodi Arias"

    The end

  4. #40129
    Senior Member raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime...id=mailsignout

    Jodi Arias lawyers miss deadline to appeal murder conviction; request extension

    Jodi Arias’ lawyers say they need more time to appeal her 2013 murder conviction after missing the deadline last week to file their legal brief.

    The deadline came and went Wednesday for the brief. The next day lawyers filed a request for a three-month extension to submit the written document on behalf of Arias, who is in prison for the brutal slaying of her former boyfriend Travis Alexander.

    Arias’ defense team citied a computer problem, staff shortages and the chronic health issues of one of the lawyers in justifying their extension request, the Arizona Republic reported Sunday.

    If the extension is granted by the Arizona Court of Appeals, the appeal will be heard by a three-judge panel after briefs are submitted by the defense and the prosecution.

    The appeal had already been delayed by about a year after problems were discovered in transcripts of Arias' trial.


    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    He left an apology note? Ok he's crazy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Words Words View Post
    that's what makes him crazy? I thought it was the chips.

  5. #40130
    Senior Member faq_q's Avatar
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    Hmmm..appears Jodi is now requesting to have her appeal sealed. I forget how to copy the article...haha! Hope everyone is doing well!

  6. #40131
    Senior Member marycontrary's Avatar
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    Assumption is the mother of all fuck ups

  7. #40132
    Senior Member raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by faq_q View Post
    Hmmm..appears Jodi is now requesting to have her appeal sealed. I forget how to copy the article...haha! Hope everyone is doing well!
    Just in time for the 10th anniversary of the murder, coming up in just over 2 weeks.


    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    He left an apology note? Ok he's crazy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Words Words View Post
    that's what makes him crazy? I thought it was the chips.

  8. #40133
    Administrator mydeathspace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Just in time for the 10th anniversary of the murder, coming up in just over 2 weeks.
    10 years?! Wow! I think Gina needs to make a guest appearance and post her Microsoft Paint images of Travis.

  9. #40134
    Senior Member DiaDeLosMuertos's Avatar
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    10 YEARS!!!???? Holy crap.
    Jenn

  10. #40135
    Senior Member Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    No way. Wow. I'm old.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by animosity View Post
    I know, right? What the fuck, puke? Willing to take in Boston, an Irish dude and like, 17 dogs but not Ron? poor Ron.

  11. #40136
    Senior Member raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://www.azcentral.com/story/news...bid/658321002/

    Arizona Appeals Court rules against Jodi Arias' request for court secrecy

    The Arizona Court of Appeals on Wednesday denied a motion by convicted killer Jodi Arias to file her opening appeals brief under seal.

    Arias’ attorneys argued that keeping the brief secret was “in the interest of protecting the safety of certain parties," and that "the absurd level of interest in this case” had caused problems since her first trial in 2013.

    In its ruling Wednesday, a three-judge panel wrote that, “The court concludes that the current request is legally insufficient to overcome the strong presumption in favor of public access.”


    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    He left an apology note? Ok he's crazy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Words Words View Post
    that's what makes him crazy? I thought it was the chips.

  12. #40137
    Senior Member DiaDeLosMuertos's Avatar
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    Ugh. She needs to get over it. She brought on the circus herself and lost her right to privacy. Girl committed one of the most gruesome and heinous crimes of my life time and needs to just serve her sentence and stfu.
    Jenn

  13. #40138
    Senior Member blighted star's Avatar
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    I guess this goes here

    https://theappeal.org/meet-the-da-wh...-murder-trial/


    SEXUAL MISCONDUCT THAT AFFECTED A MURDER TRIAL

    In the era of #MeToo, can we hold law enforcement officials accountable?


    In June 2008, Travis Alexander, a 30-year-old salesman, fell off the radar, not answering calls and missing important work meetings. After a few days, a group of friends went to his home in the suburbs of Mesa, Arizona, to check on him. They found his mutilated body in the shower. "We think he's dead, there's lots of blood," one of his friends frantically told the 911 dispatcher. "There's blood in his bedroom, behind the door and all over," she said. It was a gruesome scene: Alexander had been stabbed almost 30 times, his throat had been slit, and he had been shot in the head. By the time his friends found him, he had been dead for five days.

    On July 9, exactly one month after Alexander was found, his ex-girlfriend Jodi Arias was charged with first-degree murder. Initially, Arias insisted she didn't do it. "No jury is going to convict me - because I'm innocent and you can mark my words on that one," she told "Inside Edition." She swore she hadn't seen Alexander in two months. But her story changed and then changed again. Eventually she admitted killing Alexander, but insisted it was self-defense. Her trial made national headlines, largely because of Arias, a young brunette woman the media breathlessly described as "beautiful," "lovely," "attractive," and "soft-spoken."

    The case was tried by Juan Martinez, a star prosecutor in the Maricopa County Attorney's Office. Martinez had handled some of the county's most prominent cases throughout his career, but the Arias trial was big enough to eclipse all of them.

    Martinez was known in Maricopa for being aggressive, charming, and playing fast and loose with the rules. Phoenix magazine described him as "the most reviled and revered person at the Maricopa County Courthouse." He is one of the few prosecutors who has what could reasonably be called a fan base - the Juan Martinez Prosecutor Support Page on Facebook has over 13,000 members, and is filled with praise for Martinez and disdain for defendants and their lawyers. There are no detractors here, just people calling Martinez "Mr juanderful," "a classy gentleman," and the "Best Prosecutor ever!!!!"

    But many feel differently. Martinez has what Phoenix described as a "proclivity for salacious yarn-spinning and below-the-belt tactics." Said one Phoenix lawyer, "He has a way of getting what he wants in the courtroom, and he is truly relentless. This is not necessarily a compliment." Mel McDonald, a former judge and prosecutor and current defense attorney, was more explicit. "Juan is a victory-at-any-cost prosecutor driven by his own ego," he stated. "He lies easily and he always overreaches, always plays to the mob mentality." He doesn't play clean, and he is far too devious for me to have any respect for him. He is dangerous."

    The stakes are as high as it gets. Martinez has been described as one of the top death-penalty prosecutors in the state, racking up at least eight death penalty sentences during his career. He has been accused of prosecutorial misconduct in six of those cases. The state court identified 17 instances of inappropriate behavior by Martinez in one case alone. And new allegations indicate that Martinez's misconduct doesn't stop at the courthouse. Since Arias's conviction in 2015, Martinez has been accused of sexual misconduct and inappropriate sexual behavior by multiple women. In February 2017, Karen Clark and Ralph Adams, attorneys representing Arias in her appeal, filed a bar complaint that accused Martinez of significant inappropriate sexual misconduct related to the case, including having sex with a member of the press in exchange for favorable coverage and sexting jurors. In March of this year, they presented the state bar with new sexual harassment allegations, supposedly from as many as eight women. The new allegations raise even more questions about his professional conduct, especially when it comes to his relationships with women.

    According to the attorneys, Martinez egregiously violated various ethical rules throughout the Arias trial. Martinez allegedly had sexual relationships with two bloggers who were covering the Arias trial. (Both women denied these claims, though Clark and Adams included extensive supporting evidence, including text messages and corroborating testimony. Martinez neither denied nor admitted to having sex with these women.) According to the complaint, Martinez "did so for his own selfish reasons, including so that they would publish certain non-public information that was damaging to Arias's defense."

    The attorneys went even further than accusing Martinez of leaking information that would be inadmissible in court to the media. Martinez allegedly used one of the bloggers to "help him gather "dirt" about a seated juror" because he thought the juror would be unwilling to sentence Arias to death. Martinez was unsuccessful in his effort to get the juror unseated, but his instincts were correct: That jury member was ultimately the only holdout on a death penalty conviction, resulting in a mistrial for the sentencing phase. (Mysteriously, "minutes" after a mistrial was declared, the juror?s name was made public.)

    Martinez's obsession with finding out private details about jurors resulted in additional violations of ethical boundaries during Arias's sentencing retrial, according to Clark and Adams's complaint. He allegedly engaged in an "inappropriate telephone and text-message relationship" with a juror who had been dismissed midtrial. The relationship, the complaint alleges, included the woman sending him nude photos and was encouraged by one of the bloggers. The dismissed juror later said that both Martinez and the blogger tried to get her to disclose private details about other jury members.

    Clark and Adams presented the state bar with a wealth of evidence to support these allegations, including text message records, interviews with persons involved, and corroboration from friends and family. What's more, Martinez did not explicitly deny most of the allegations, stating that his "private sexual life is no one's business but his own." Yet, in January, the state bar's legal counsel dismissed the charges outright, refusing to even refer the case to the bar's probable cause committee, which could have recommended consequences or sanctions, or to refer his case to a disciplinary hearing. Although the bar stated that "some of the charges relating to [his] conduct "would undermine public confidence that her case was administered justly," they said that there was not "clear and convincing evidence" that he engaged in the behavior he was accused of. And while the bar called these alleged relationships "ill-advised" and stated that they would "predictably result in allegations of misconduct," they also ultimately agreed with Martinez, concluding that sexual relationships with members of the media "does not constitute a violation of the ethical rules."

    Clark and Adams insist, in their appeal of the bar's decision, that, "the sex is not the point." The point, rather, is that Martinez allegedly "engaged in improper, undisclosed relationships with these members of the media covering the case; provided them after-hours access to non-public areas of the MCAO offices and non-public information about the case; used them in many ways "with the prosecution of a death penalty case," they wrote.

    "The improper relationships exist within the context of voluminous other acts of misconduct: which taken together constitute a gross violation of Respondent's duties as a minister of justice, and a gross lapse of judgment in how he should conduct himself in the most serious case for which a prosecutor can be responsible: a capital murder case in which he seeks the death penalty." (In March, the bar's Attorney Discipline Probable Cause Committee ordered the state bar to reinvestigate Martinez, in response to Clark and Adams?s appeal.)

    It's not the first time the State Bar of Arizona has dealt with allegations about Martinez's conduct. In just the three years since Arias was sentenced to life without parole in 2015, Martinez has faced six bar complaints on various grounds. All have been dismissed.

    Even now, in an era that demands both increased accountability for sexual harassment and increased prosecutorial accountability more broadly, almost no one seems willing to hold Martinez responsible - not his boss, County Attorney Bill Montgomery, not the courts, and not the state bar.

    The same leniency has not been extended to Martinez's opponents in court. In 2016, Arias's former attorney, Kirk Nurmi, self-published a book, Trapped with Ms. Arias. The book included what the state bar described as "disparaging remarks" about the defendant and revealed details about private conversations Nurmi had with Arias and members of her family. It also included evidence that had been deemed inadmissible by the trial judge. A bar complaint was filed against Nurmi, and he was disbarred for publishing the book.

    Like Nurmi, Martinez published a book in 2016 called Conviction: The Untold Story of Putting Jodi Arias Behind Bars. Similarly, his book promised to "unearth new details from the investigation that were never revealed at trial, explor[e] key facts from the case and the pieces of evidence he chose to keep close to the vest." The book also included unfavorable characterizations of Arias, and alleged that one juror was in love with her. A bar complaint was also filed against Martinez for his book. Although Nurmi was disbarred, Martinez?s complaint was dismissed.
    <<cont'd>>
    Last edited by blighted star; 05-31-2018 at 03:38 PM.

  14. #40139
    Senior Member blighted star's Avatar
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    <<cont'd>>

    Of course, as a defense attorney, Nurmi's decision to speak negatively about Arias has significantly different implications than Martinez's decision to do the same. But whether or not Martinez's decision to write a book was technically improper, it was certainly unprofessional. The state bar agreed. "The perception created when a prosecutor attempts to immediately profit from his participation in a high-profile case is also very concerning," stated the court's order of dismissal. Others also criticized Martinez's book. Dan Barr, an attorney in Phoenix and a former member of the State Bar of Arizona's Ethics Committee, said it was a "horrible idea."

    "I can't imagine what the County Attorney's Office is thinking," he stated. "There's no upside for the county here in Juan Martinez publishing. There obviously is an upside for Juan Martinez in promoting himself and publishing his book."

    Not only has the state bar declined to hold Martinez accountable, but judges have repeatedly turned down opportunities to penalize outrageous behavior. In 2005, Martinez compared a Jewish defense lawyer to Adolf Hitler, which the Arizona Court of Appeals described as "reprehensible." During that same trial, Martinez told the jury that the defendant had covered up past crimes, even though the judge had ruled that information could not be disclosed to the jury. The Court of Appeals called the disclosure "improper." Still, the case was not overturned and no action was taken against Martinez.

    Also in 2005, Martinez prosecuted Cory Morris, who was convicted of killing five sex workers and dumping their bodies in an alley. Martinez accused Morris of necrophilia, telling the jury that the defendant "continued to have sex with their bodies until they rotted and fell apart." There was only one problem - the medical examiner hadn't concluded any such thing. Yet, the Arizona Supreme Court excused his behavior, concluding that prosecutors have "wide latitude," and did not overturn Morris's case.

    Even without the state bar and the courts, Martinez is presumably accountable to his office. But his boss, County Attorney Bill Montgomery, has repeatedly swept aside the misconduct allegations. Montgomery has even blamed the recurring complaints against Martinez on the ability of people to file complaints, implying that they are frivolous. Montgomery and his line prosecutors are emphatic about being tough on crime, and adhere to an ethos of harsh consequences. Yet, when it comes to Martinez, that attitude does not seem to apply.

    Clark and Adams's petition is still under consideration, so there remains a chance that Martinez will be held accountable by the state bar. But until then, he continues to be one of the most powerful prosecutors in Arizona - and continues to evade consequences.
    Last edited by blighted star; 05-31-2018 at 03:43 PM.

  15. #40140
    Senior Member raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    https://nypost.com/2018/07/07/jodi-a...us-like-trial/

    Jodi Arias appeals murder conviction, cites ‘circus-like’ trial

    odi Arias is asking an appeals court to overturn her murder conviction in the 2008 death of her former boyfriend, saying a prosecutor’s misconduct and a judge’s failure to control news coverage during the salacious case deprived her of the right to a fair trial.

    In the appeal released Friday, Arias’ lawyers said prosecutor Juan Martinez improperly questioned witnesses, ignored rulings on evidence and courted news coverage. They also said Judge Sherry Stephens let news organizations turn the trial into a “circus-like atmosphere,” was slow to restrict journalists even when they broke the court’s media-coverage rules and allowed trial spectators to become emboldened by what they saw on the livestream from the Phoenix courtroom.


    Quote Originally Posted by Angiebla View Post
    He left an apology note? Ok he's crazy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Words Words View Post
    that's what makes him crazy? I thought it was the chips.

  16. #40141
    🤔 Angiebla's Avatar
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    Good luck with that one Jodi

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

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