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Thread: Life Goes On: Organ Donation Thread

  1. #351
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Not exactly organ donation (although now he will need a new heart...just a reminder of the constant need for donated organs) but what a cool story that they could do this and save his life!

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/te...ignout#image=2

    Tennessee doctors removed a man's heart to save his life

    – In an extraordinary operation, a Mississippi man's heart was removed and replaced with what Baptist Memorial Hospital doctors call a "total artificial heart" — battery-charged electromechanical devices that will keep the 41-year-old man's blood pumping until a heart transplant can be arranged.

    Wearing a surgical-style mask decorated with an American flag and the motto "United We Stand," artificial heart recipient Brian Pedigosaid Wednesday that his life since his first heart attack —which came "11 days before my 33rd birthday" — had been a constant struggle with heart disease, including a "massive" 2017 heart attack and the almost complete bodily shutdown that led to his Sept. 3 surgery at Baptist.

    "I was close to giving up," said Pedigo, who lives in Booneville, about 115 miles southeast off Memphis, with his wife, Amy Pedigo, their two dogs, Remington and Angel, and a pot-bellied pig named Sassy Mae, nicknamed Sassy Pants. ("She talks back to Brian, that's why I call her Sassy Pants," Amy explained.)

    Fortunately, the artificial heart — essentially, a pair of pumps that replace the removed ventricles of the heart — has given Pedigo a new lease on life, literally.

    "I feel great," said Pedigo, sitting on the edge of a hospital bed. Unsurprisingly, he looked thin and sounded hoarse. "For the last eight years, I've fought, gone down and come back," he said.

    Dr. Dmitry Yaranov, Pedigo's primary cardiologist at Baptist, said only about 15 operations of the type that saved Pedigo have been performed in history.

    "This is the most complex, the rarest and the highest-risk operation a heart patient can go through," he said.

    Also, "the most technically challenging," said Dr. Rachel Harrison, the surgeon who performed the operation with Dr. Martin Strueber, Baptist chief of cardiac surgery and thoracic transplantation.

    "It's a very unconventional approach," said Michelle Lorenz, administrative director of transplant services at Baptist. "But we had to do it to save his life."

    Pedigo had been receiving treatment in Corinth, Mississippi, before doctors there sent him to Vanderbilt University Medical Center. From there, he came to Memphis, where his failing health called for extreme measures.

    "His lungs were no longer oxygenating his blood," Harrison said. "His liver was starting to fail. His kidneys were starting to fail."

    Deemed too ill to survive a conventional heart transplant, Pedigo instead received what Yaranov called a "total artificial heart," even though the atria — the smaller upper chambers of the heart — are left behind in this type surgery, to receive blood from the veins. In place of the removed ventricles are a pair of "ventricular assist devices," sewn in place with felt-like "cuffs."

    The devices are regarded by doctors as "a bridge to transplantation," meaning that it is supposed to be replaced by a donor heart, eventually. To this end, Pedigo also received a type of breast implant, to fill the hollow left behind by the removed heart and act as a "spacer," to keep the chest ready for a future heart transplant.

    The surgery lasted hours. Amy Pedigo said that due to COVID-19 concerns, she couldn't spend all that time in the hospital. "I stayed in my vehicle, and they would call me every hour with updates."

    Surgery aside, "She never left my side," Pedigo said. The Pedigos have seven children, ages 13 to 25, and six grandchildren. "Family is everything to me," Brian Pedigo said.

    Although the extremity of Pedigo's case is unusual, heart troubles are not. Yaranov said "ischemic heart disease" — which involves the reduction of blood flow to the heart due to blockages in the arteries — is the top killer of white men in the United States. The Mid-South in particular is America's "coronary disease belt," he said, with the highest incidence of heart disease in the nation.

    Why? "Genetics, diet and lifestyle," Yaranov said. "That Southern diet."

    As a result of the surgery, Pedigo — a construction worker and auto mechanic — has to make what he called a "major life adjustment." Most notably, he now has two tubes emerging from this torso. These tubes connect the pumps of his artificial heart to outside-the-body batteries that he carries in shoulder-strap bags. The batteries keep the artificial heart running. They, in turn, must be charged periodically, like a cellphone.

    Is dealing with the batteries a burden? "If it keeps me alive," Pedigo said, "I don't care."

    In any event, a sure sign of Pedigo's progress is this very story: Baptist officials waited until they were certain the surgery was a success before contacting a reporter via email. The email contained this remarkable subject line: "Surgeons save a patient's life by removing his heart."

  2. #352
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    Chicago surgeons perform first double lung transplant with organs from former COVID patient

    https://www.nydailynews.com/coronavi...i6q-story.html

    Surgeons in Chicago for the first time have performed a double lung transplant using organs donated by a patient who previously had COVID-19.

    The 10-hour, life-saving procedure occurred at North Western Medicine in February, the health care provider revealed in a statement on Friday. The recipient, an Illinois healthcare worker in his 60s, was diagnosed with coronavirus in in May 2020, growing sicker and sicker until he was ultimately placed on a ventilator.

    After spending a week on the transplant list, doctors decided the man could no longer wait and elected to use the lungs of a former COVID-19 patient. The organ donor, who only experienced minor symptoms linked to the fast spreading illness, had made a full recovery by the time of their unrelated, accidental death.

    'This is a milestone for lung transplantation,' says Dr. Ankit Bharat, chief of thoracic surgery and surgical director of the Northwestern Medicine Lung Transplant Program, who performed the procedure.

    'To date, 30 million Americans have had COVID-19 and many of them are registered organ donors. If we say 'no' to them just because they had COVID-19 in the past, we will drastically reduce the donor pool and there's already a big supply and demand gap.'

    Since the global pandemic emerged late last year, Northwestern Medicine surgeons have completed 14 double-lung transplants on COVID-19 survivors ' more than any other hospital in the world. Health experts have expressed concern that even those who have recovered from the virus could face long term effects, which could increase the need for organ donations moving forward.

    'We will have a massive problem on our hands if Americans can't donate their organs after having a mild to moderate case of COVID-19,' Bharat added.

  3. #353
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    This is good news. I was wondering how they were going to treat donors who had already had COVID.

  4. #354
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    https://www.cnn.com/2021/04/09/asia/...hnk/index.html

    Japanese doctors perform world's first living donor lung transplant to a Covid-19 patient

    A Japanese woman whose lungs were severely damaged by Covid-19 has received what doctors say is the world's first lung transplant from living donors to a recovered coronavirus patient.

    Kyoto University Hospital said the woman underwent an 11-hour operation by a 30-strong medical team on Wednesday to transplant lung tissue from her husband and son.

    Covid-19 is known to cause severe lung damage in some patients, and people around the world -- including the United States -- have received lung transplants as part of their recovery from the disease.

    But the Kyoto hospital said this case was the first in which lung tissue had been transplanted from living donors to a Covid-19 patient.

    Dr. Hiroshi Date, a thoracic surgeon at the hospital who led the operation, said it gave hope to patients suffering from severe lung damage from Covid-19.

    "We demonstrated that we now have an option of lung transplants (from living donors)," he said at a Thursday news conference.

    The patient, identified only as a woman from Japan's western region of Kansai, contracted Covid-19 late last year, and spent months on a life support machine that worked as an artificial lung, according to Kyoto University Hospital.

    Covid-19 caused so much damage to her lungs they were no longer functional, and she required a lung transplant to live.

    The woman's husband and son offered to donate parts of their lungs. Transplants from brain-dead donors are still rare in Japan, and live donors are considered a better option, according to the hospital's statement.

    The husband and son are in a stable condition and the woman remains in intensive care. She's expected to be able to leave the hospital in about two months, according to the hospital.

    In June last year, US surgeons performed a successful double lung transplant on a Covid-19 patient -- believed to be the first such operation on a coronavirus patient in the country.

    Last month, US surgeons completed a "Covid to Covid" double lung transplant, using lungs from a donor who recovered from Covid-19, only to die from another cause, for a patient in his 60s whose lungs were damaged by the disease.

    A study released earlier this year of more than 1,700 patients treated in the Chinese city of Wuhan -- ground zero of the pandemic -- found that X-rays of severely ill patients showed evidence of lung damage months after their infection.

  5. #355
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    https://www.nbcnews.com/health/healt...ient-rcna12928

    In medical first, kidneys from gene-edited pig implanted into brain-dead patient

    In an operating room at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, the surgical team was nervous but hopeful. It was Sept. 30, and they were attempting a medical first: implanting kidneys from a genetically altered pig into the abdomen of a human.

    The lead surgeon, Dr. Jayme Locke, carefully sewed the first pig kidney into the patient, James Parsons, 57, a carpenter and father from Huntsville, Alabama. Days earlier, Parsons had been rendered brain-dead in an accident in a dirt bike race. A registered organ donor, he had long expressed a desire to his family to donate his organs after he died.

    If the surgical experiment succeeded, it could help revolutionize organ donation, because shortages have created yearslong waits for those desperately in need of transplants. But if the kidneys turned black within minutes, the dozen or so people in the operating room would know that Parsons’ immune system was rejecting the new organs. The team waited.

    “There was a lot at stake at that moment,” said Dr. Paige Porrett, the director of clinical translational research for the Comprehensive Transplant Institute at the university’s surgery department. “We’re talking about the life’s work of a lot of researchers, scientists. The hope of hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of patients who we haven’t met yet were depending on this to work.”

    Locke removed the clamps, and the team watched with joy as the kidney turned the pink color it was supposed to be. Twenty-three minutes later, it started making urine, evidence that the transplant had been a success.

    “I’m pretty sure there were high-fives at that moment,” said Locke, who is the director of the university’s Comprehensive Transplant Institute.

    Peer-reviewed results of the novel operation were reported Thursday in The American Journal of Transplantation. To conduct the experiment, the surgeons got permission from Parsons’ family and then removed his own kidneys. The gene-edited pig kidneys they implanted remained functional up until surgeons removed them about 77 hours later.

    The experiment is part of the growing field of xenotransplantation, or the sourcing of animal organs to try to solve the human organ supply crisis.

  6. #356
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    I have to honor James. He's a hero. This is amazing news and if it weren't for the selfless act of him and his family, this might not have happened.

    Here's to James!
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    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
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  7. #357
    Senior Member KimTisha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Babe 73 View Post
    I have to honor James. He's a hero. This is amazing news and if it weren't for the selfless act of him and his family, this might not have happened.

    Here's to James!
    WOW! This is amazing. Good for his family, letting someone go isn't easy under any circumstances, but bless them for carrying out his wishes AND facilitating a giant step for medicine in the process.

    Presumably, his healthy kidneys were donated and the pig kidneys were put in their place? The article isn't clear about that. I wonder if he donated any other organs in the end.
    You are talking to a woman who has laughed in the face of death, sneered at doom and chuckled at catastrophe.
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  8. #358
    Senior Member KimTisha's Avatar
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    I've donated my brain to the Concussion Legacy Foundation - after I'm finished with it naturally!

    These folks are doing amazing research and they need lots of donor brains (concussed and otherwise) to keep doing it. When I read their study and saw the photographs of Aaron Hernandez's brain, I wanted to cry. His brain looked like a wilted, rotten cauliflower. If you ever wonder why [some] football players and professional athletes make millions.... that's why - and it's still not enough to compensate for destroying the single most important organ in your body.

    https://concussionfoundation.org/get...earch-registry

    I worry about my son. Growing up, he was an Adventurer par excellence and suffered eight diagnosed concussions between the ages of 5-18 years (mostly sports-related), and a ninth when he was 24 (auto accident). After he became a father, he stopped extreme sports, but he's still very active. He is forty-three now, and over the past few years, has begun to show symptoms of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Of course, it can't be diagnosed without a brain autopsy, but his doctor is concerned about the possibility based on his documented history of concussions. When he was young, we didn't know anything about the brain. We thought brain damage could never be reversed because we didn't understand the neuro-plasticity of the brain. If I knew then, what I know now, I would never have allowed him to start playing competitive contact sports at the age of six. Football, soccer, wrestling.... for 19 years, this guy was banging his head around on a weekly basis since he was SIX YEARS OLD! Ugh, it sickens me to think about it.

    You are talking to a woman who has laughed in the face of death, sneered at doom and chuckled at catastrophe.
    ...Collector of Chairs. Reader of Books. Hater of Nutmeg...

  9. #359
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    I think that's really cool KT!

    ETA: not what might be with your son, the fact that you are donating your brain to help the research.
    Last edited by raisedbywolves; 03-07-2022 at 10:29 AM.

  10. #360
    Senior Member Bewitchingstorm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimTisha View Post
    I've donated my brain to the Concussion Legacy Foundation - after I'm finished with it naturally!

    These folks are doing amazing research and they need lots of donor brains (concussed and otherwise) to keep doing it. When I read their study and saw the photographs of Aaron Hernandez's brain, I wanted to cry. His brain looked like a wilted, rotten cauliflower. If you ever wonder why [some] football players and professional athletes make millions.... that's why - and it's still not enough to compensate for destroying the single most important organ in your body.

    https://concussionfoundation.org/get...earch-registry

    I worry about my son. Growing up, he was an Adventurer par excellence and suffered eight diagnosed concussions between the ages of 5-18 years (mostly sports-related), and a ninth when he was 24 (auto accident). After he became a father, he stopped extreme sports, but he's still very active. He is forty-three now, and over the past few years, has begun to show symptoms of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Of course, it can't be diagnosed without a brain autopsy, but his doctor is concerned about the possibility based on his documented history of concussions. When he was young, we didn't know anything about the brain. We thought brain damage could never be reversed because we didn't understand the neuro-plasticity of the brain. If I knew then, what I know now, I would never have allowed him to start playing competitive contact sports at the age of six. Football, soccer, wrestling.... for 19 years, this guy was banging his head around on a weekly basis since he was SIX YEARS OLD! Ugh, it sickens me to think about it.

    It is terrible to think about the damage that could have been caused to your son's brain engaging in sports all those years. The Foundation itself is doing tremendous work...such a great cause.

  11. #361
    Moderator puzzld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bewitchingstorm View Post
    It is terrible to think about the damage that could have been caused to your son's brain engaging in sports all those years. The Foundation itself is doing tremendous work...such a great cause.
    It really is tragic. A cousin of mine had a couple of concussions as a child and teen and I'm convinced that the damage done led to his suicide. I used to love football. Can't watch it now.

    Good for you donating your brain KT.
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    lol at Nestle being some vicious smiter, she's the nicest person on this site besides probably puzzld. Or at least the last person to resort to smiting.
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    Why on earth would I smite you when I can ban you?

  12. #362
    Senior Member Bewitchingstorm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by puzzld View Post
    It really is tragic. A cousin of mine had a couple of concussions as a child and teen and I'm convinced that the damage done led to his suicide. I used to love football. Can't watch it now.

    Good for you donating your brain KT.
    Very sad about your cousin, Puzz.

  13. #363
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    This made my day:

    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    That is too pretty to be shoved up an ass.

  14. #364
    Senior Member Bewitchingstorm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Babe 73 View Post
    This made my day:

    I that.

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