View Poll Results: What is your preferred climate?

Voters
175. You may not vote on this poll
  • Standard northern...warm summers, cold winters, frequent snow.

    47 26.86%
  • Hot, Hot, hot! And humid (think Florida)

    25 14.29%
  • Standard Southern...Hot summers, cool winters, little to no snow

    44 25.14%
  • Moderately warm, lots of rain (Pacific Northwest).

    32 18.29%
  • Desert...keep it warm with little rain.

    11 6.29%
  • Cold. Frozen tundra cold.

    16 9.14%
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Thread: Discuss the weather here...

  1. #2001
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Babe 73 View Post
    Hunker down and prepare. I know it's a PITA, but I think it's going to lose speed once it hits land. It's still unpleasant though.

    I had forgotten that Ireland gets hurricanes. It's not that common, but does happen and living on the South West Coast means that where we are is more susceptible. It's been EONS since I've had to worry about them at all.

    On the positive side, no more earthquakes, mud slides or wildfires.

    ETA: Ireland gets Cyclones and Tornadoes too. Party.
    Looks like it's turning north west away from us and is now being downgraded to a Cat 1 before hitting land up near the Panhandle. I will still keep an eye on it, because the worst hurricane that has hit since i moved here 17 years ago wasn't forecast to hit us, but I am relieved.

    If you ever need to evacuate Ireland you can come to Florida and stay with me.

  2. #2002
    Cousin Greg Angiebla's Avatar
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    Stay safe RBW!

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  3. #2003
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Well, the latest track puts it right over our area and they are saying 15 inches of rain where I live. I am VERY concerned about flooding.

  4. #2004
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Well, the latest track puts it right over our area and they are saying 15 inches of rain where I live. I am VERY concerned about flooding.
    Stay safe!!!!
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    That is too pretty to be shoved up an ass.

  5. #2005
    Moderator puzzld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    Well, the latest track puts it right over our area and they are saying 15 inches of rain where I live. I am VERY concerned about flooding.
    Stay safe!
    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    lol at Nestle being some vicious smiter, she's the nicest person on this site besides probably puzzld. Or at least the last person to resort to smiting.
    Quote Originally Posted by nestlequikie View Post
    Why on earth would I smite you when I can ban you?

  6. #2006
    Senior Member curiouscat's Avatar
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    I'm glad the event I was supposed to work in Jacksonville, this weekend, was canceled. There is no way I'm driving in a tropical storm and potentially not being able to find gas.
    It was bad driving across the causeway today. The wind was blowing and people were jerking back into their lanes.
    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Babe 73 View Post
    I don't have a thousand dollars hanging around to buy a fart in a jar lol.

  7. #2007
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by curiouscat View Post
    I'm glad the event I was supposed to work in Jacksonville, this weekend, was canceled. There is no way I'm driving in a tropical storm and potentially not being able to find gas.
    It was bad driving across the causeway today. The wind was blowing and people were jerking back into their lanes.
    Stay safe CC! My guess is that everything is going to be cancelled for awhile!

  8. #2008
    Moderator raisedbywolves's Avatar
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    I saw this on an article about whether a lot of people will leave Florida after Hurricane Ian. I thought it was a very apt description of what happens during a hurricane for those that have never been through the process-from initial forecast of the hurricane to the aftermath.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/other...2de8b470708faf

    We often speak of hurricanes in terms of the physical damage they cause. Already, some are predicting that Hurricane Ian, which made landfall Wednesday afternoon on Florida’s southwest coast, could result in up to $70 billion in destruction, which would make it one of the most costly storms in U.S. history. And a major hit for insurance companies.

    But there’s another toll that comes with the arrival of each hurricane — or even the looming threat of one. Namely, the stress that it causes.

    Certainly, the dread of dealing with storms is a reason cited by many former Floridians I know as one of the key reasons they left the Sunshine State. “It’s not the stress of it hitting you. It’s the stress of the anticipation,” said Tom Peeling, a former colleague of mine who spent most of his life and career in the state — we worked together at The Palm Beach Post in West Palm Beach, Fl. — before he retired to North Carolina a couple of years ago.

    It’s a bit hard to explain what this anxiety is all about, but let me try. Before I experienced my first true hurricane in 2004, I was actually semi-eager to see how a storm plays out. And I admit there is something breathtaking and bewildering about hearing those winds rattle your house — and if you’re stupid enough to go outside like I did for a brief moment or two, to feel their blunt force as well.

    But here’s the thing: Those winds aren’t a sudden gust that comes and goes. They are with you for what seems like an eternity, like a horror show of nature. To this day, I’ll never forget that sound they create — loud, violent and unrelenting. They say the sound of a tornado is like that of a freight train coming right at you. I say the sound of a hurricane is like that of a tornado that stubbornly refuses to pass through the darkest of nights.

    Then, finally, it’s over. But that’s where the real struggle begins, even if you’re lucky enough to have little to no damage to your house. (The worst I ever dealt with was some minor roof issues, though I had neighbors who saw their roofs and parts of their house destroyed.) The main problem: You’ve probably lost power — and in Florida, power means air-conditioning. Hurricanes arrive when you’re in what’s called the “mean season,” that roughly six-month period of days of 90-degree temperatures that are accompanied by 90% humidity. You basically live indoors for much of that time, even if it means racking up $300-plus monthly electric bills.

    After a hurricane, however, the great indoors becomes the great enemy. Your house is hot — I mean Hades hot — and you can practically feel the mold and mildew starting to envelop your sanctuary. But it’s almost as hot outside, so forget about seeking relief there. Meanwhile, all the food in your fridge is going bad, so you’re living off the peanut-butter from your hurricane supply stash and you’ve got a massive headache owing to the fact you can’t make coffee because your coffee-maker naturally needs power, too.

    This goes on for days. Even weeks in some instances. It takes time to restore all that electricity to all those homes, especially because every street is a mess of toppled trees and downed power lines. But again, you count your blessings that you’re still alive and have a home. The outcomes have been far worse for so many people with some storms, such as Hurricane Andrew in 1992 and Katrina in 2005.

    Still, imagine going through all this and now it’s later in the hurricane season — or it’s a whole new one — and a storm is approaching. You’re living in the cone. You know what can happen. Think of the stress you’ll feel.

    Making matters worse: Every time you turn on the TV, there’s a local weather forecaster basically saying it’s the end of days. And you’re trying to stay sane while putting plywood over your windows and getting all your stuff together, so it won’t blow to the heavens if your roof comes off: As Tom Peeling told me, “You don’t realize how much junk you have around the house until a hurricane is coming.”

    Or, even worse, you are forced to evacuate along with a gazillion other Floridians. You think Florida traffic is bad on a normal day? Try driving in the period leading up to the arrival of a hurricane.

    It all adds up … and can haunt you for the rest of your life, especially if you choose to remain in the state. Wayne Brackin, a former chief operating officer of Baptist Health South Florida who now heads KIDZ Medical Services, a network that serves hospitals in the state, dealt with Hurricane Andrew. He told me, “For many years after, I would feel a sense of fatigue when another storm threatened. Many, many of my fellow storm survivors have told me they have similar feelings.” The bottom line for Brackin: “Paradise has some hidden costs.”

  9. #2009
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisedbywolves View Post
    I saw this on an article about whether a lot of people will leave Florida after Hurricane Ian. I thought it was a very apt description of what happens during a hurricane for those that have never been through the process-from initial forecast of the hurricane to the aftermath.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/other...2de8b470708faf
    Yep. Same with blizzards, ice storms etc. Only you freeze to death because you have no heat. The good news is your food won't go bad, but if you put it outside you end up with all of it frozen lol. We would get the hurricanes too so it was all kinds of fun throughout the year.
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    That is too pretty to be shoved up an ass.

  10. #2010
    Senior Member curiouscat's Avatar
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    I have a stupid friend.
    She doesn't understand why the Causeway is blocked.
    Ummm... flooding caused by heavy rain. Duh!
    Quote Originally Posted by Boston Babe 73 View Post
    I don't have a thousand dollars hanging around to buy a fart in a jar lol.

  11. #2011
    Senior Member Bewitchingstorm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by curiouscat View Post
    I have a stupid friend.
    She doesn't understand why the Causeway is blocked.
    Ummm... flooding caused by heavy rain. Duh!
    Geez.

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