Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 49

Thread: Sometimes I just need a pick me up to start my day-Feel good stories

  1. #1
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    23,349
    Rep Power
    21474869

    Sometimes I just need a pick me up to start my day-Feel good stories

    We have so much doom and gloom. Lets start a thread where we can post heartwarming current event stories that might not be worthy of an entire thread by themselves.

    https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Wellness/...t_hero_bsq_hed

    Doctor erases cancer patients' medical debt totaling $650,000

    Around 200 people are starting 2021 off without any medical debt thanks to the kindness of an oncology doctor who erased $650,000 of his patients' debt.

    Dr. Omar Atiq, a medical oncologist for nearly 40 years, closed his cancer clinic in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, in March after nearly three decades in business.

    He worked with a billing company for several months after closing to try to collect payments from his former patients, but soon made a decision to stop reaching out.

    "Over time I realized that there are people who just are unable to pay," Atiq told "Good Morning America." "So my wife and I, as a family, we thought about it and looked at forgiving all the debt."

    "We saw that we could do it and then just went ahead and did it," he said.

    The week of Christmas, around 200 of Atiq's former patients received a holiday greeting that read, "I hope this note finds you well. The Arkansas Cancer Clinic was proud to serve you as a patient. Although various health insurances pay most of the bills for majority of patients, even the deductibles and co-pays can be burdensome. Unfortunately, that is the way our health care system currently works. Arkansas Cancer Clinic is closing its practice after over 29 years of dedicated service to the community. The clinic has decided to forego all balances owed to the clinic by its patients. Happy Holidays.?

  2. #2
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    23,349
    Rep Power
    21474869
    https://abcnews.go.com/Weird/wireSto..._headlines_hed

    Police officer pays for shoplifting suspects' holiday dinner

    A Massachusetts police officer declined to charge two women accused of trying to steal groceries for the children — and instead bought them Christmas dinner.

    Somerset Officer Matt Lima responded to a report of shoplifting Dec. 20 at Stop & Shop, where two women with two young children were accused of putting groceries into bags at a self-checkout kiosk without scanning them.

    The women said they had fallen on hard times and were trying to provide a Christmas dinner for the children. Lima says he was reminded of his own children and used his own money to buy $250 in grocery gift cards.

    “His actions exemplify what it means to protect and serve the members of our community," Chief George McNeil said on the department's website.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5,060
    Rep Power
    0
    https://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/2021/0...-through-coma/

    Does this story county for the thread

    MAULDIN, S.C. (WYFF) - A South Carolina man who spent more than two months in the hospital with COVID-19 credits his wife’s voice with helping him make it through a coma and into recovery.

    Don Gillmer, 43, did his best to stay healthy amid the COVID-19 pandemic, but on July 5, he tested positive for the virus. Four days later came the cough, so he went to the hospital. He wouldn’t leave for the next 63 days.

    “I received convalescent plasma twice, Remdesevir. Nothing was working. Nothing was helping me recover, so I’ll really never forget when they came in with papers I needed to sign to go on a ventilator. That scared me,” Don Gillmer said.

    About a month later, the 43-year-old’s temperature reached 104 degrees, and he was put in a medically induced coma. The doctor called his wife, Lacy Gillmer, and told her he might not make it through the night. She and his father rushed to see him.

    “I just told him that he was doing great, that they were taking such good care of him. He was in amazing hands,” Lacy Gillmer said.

    Don Gillmer says his wife’s words helped him make it through.

    “I swear I heard her, swear I heard her voice, and by the time she left, I was stable. She’s my angel. She’s the reason I’m here,” he said.


    But even after he woke up from his coma, Don Gillmer had a long road to recovery, including weeks of physical training as he relearned how to walk. He was finally discharged Sept. 11.

    The 43-year-old still has therapy twice a week, saying he wouldn’t get through it without his wife.

    “I think about her drive to the hospital the night they told her that I may not make it. You know, can’t imagine that. I tell her often I don’t know that I could have been as strong as her,” he said.

    He’s now asking others to take COVID-19 seriously.

    “We need to be smart and diligent and take care of each other. It’s about your fellow man,” he said.

  4. #4
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    23,349
    Rep Power
    21474869
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnLanders View Post
    https://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/2021/0...-through-coma/

    Does this story county for the thread
    Sure...anything heart warming and positive belongs here.

  5. #5
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    23,349
    Rep Power
    21474869
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/covid-i...-message-hope/

    ICU nurse throws baby shower for mother who survived COVID-19

    For ICU nurse Caitlyn Obrock, the last year has been a blur. She's treated hundreds of COVID-19 patients at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis. But, she says, one patient stands above.

    "From the very beginning Monique was special to me," Obrock said.

    Monique Jones, 28, came to the hospital deathly ill from COVID-19 and six months pregnant. "The baby was priority over her," Obrock said of Jones. "She would do anything for her baby."

    Jones was eventually intubated, but Obrock talked to her and prayed over her for countless hours. When doctors decided the only hope for mother and child was an emergency C-section, Obrock made a promise.

    "I was like, if Monique makes it, we're going to throw her the biggest baby shower there is to have," Obrock said.

    It was a promise she joyfully kept when Zamyrah arrived — all 2 pounds, 5 ounces of her. "I just started crying as soon as I saw everything, like this couldn't be for me," Jones said of the baby shower.

    Obrock raised thousands from friends, family and coworkers.

    And even though her favorite patients are now out of the hospital, Obrock still visits regularly. She has to — she's the godmother and Jones' new best friend.

    "I never really felt that special to somebody. I really needed somebody like her," Jones said.

    It's important, especially at the end of this God-awful week, to know that, while all that was going on, so was this. While chaos reigned in Washington, compassion ruled in this corner of the heartland and across the country. Because the soul of America can't be ransacked and the solution to what ails us sure as heck isn't under a dome.

    "It's not a matter of politics, it's just a matter of loving people," Obrock said. "That's what we need. Days that I feel like I can't go anymore — through those hard days when I don't think my patient is going to make it — I just know there's another Monique that needs us."

    And there's your battle cry, America, for a real uprising.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5,060
    Rep Power
    0
    https://www.bbc.com/news/stories-55559382

    Jesse Thistle spent more than a decade on the streets and in jail. But despite this he has managed to become an expert on the culture of his Indigenous Canadian ancestors - with the help of his mother, from whom he was separated as a young child.

    Sometimes, at night, feeling humiliated after a day of begging, Jesse Thistle would walk up to the fountain on Ottawa's Parliament Hill.

    Sitting on the edge of the monument, he would plunge his hands into the cold water, to fish out the coins visitors had thrown in for luck. The policemen on duty always saw Jesse coming. They'd watch as he shovelled handfuls of wet change into his pockets, then chase him away.

    Jesse was 32 and had recently relapsed from rehab, but he'd been living on the streets, on and off, ever since his grandparents kicked him out when he was 19.

    "My grandfather was a disciplinarian - old school - he believed in work, really hard work, and he would hit us if we did bad stuff," Jesse says.

    "He would say, 'If I ever catch you doing drugs, I will disown you, it's that simple,' and he meant what he said."

    So the day that Jesse's grandmother saw a bag of cocaine fall out of Jesse's pocket, he was told to pack his things and leave.

    "It was like my world had ended," he says. "I could see on their faces that I'd broken their hearts."

    Short presentational grey line
    Jesse's life had been chaotic from the start. His father, Sonny, had got into trouble with the law in Toronto and had run away to northern Saskatchewan, where he met a teenager from the M?tis-Cree Indigenous group.


    Her name was Blanche and she gave birth to three sons one after the other, Josh first, Jerry, and then Jesse.

    Sonny drank and used heroin, and was often violent, so eventually Blanche ran away, taking the boys with her.

    For a while they lived in Moose Jaw, sleeping on proper beds rather than piles of laundry and eating three meals a day. Then Sonny turned up again and told Blanche he had an apartment and a job in Toronto. Blanche was studying as well as working, and he persuaded her to let him take the boys for a few months, to give her a break.


    But there was no new job, and Sonny hadn't overcome his addictions. He'd disappear for days at a time, leaving the boys - all aged under six - alone in the apartment. There was little food when Sonny was there and none when he wasn't. He taught the boys how to beg, how to shoplift, and how to roll him cigarettes by harvesting tobacco from butts picked up off the streets.

    It was a few months before a neighbour alerted Child Services, and police came and took the boys away. Jesse was by now aged four, and he and his brothers would never see their father again.

    After a period in an orphanage and a foster home, they were sent to live with Sonny's parents.

    "I assume Child Services never called my mom because back then Indigenous women were thought of as unclean, unfit and derelict of their positions as mothers," Jesse says.

    "When Indigenous kids came across Child Services' desks, their natural inclination was to put them in white homes because white people were seen as prosperous and responsible. It was called the Sixties Scoop - thousands and thousands of Indigenous kids were taken that way - it was endemic."

    Presentational grey line
    The Sixties Scoop
    Despite its name, the Sixties Scoop started in the late 1950s and persisted for more than 20 years
    About 20,000 Indigenous Canadian children were removed from their homes by child welfare agencies and placed with non-Indigenous families
    These children lost their names, their languages, and their cultural identity
    Presentational grey line
    Jesse's grandparents barred Blanche from coming to see her children for a few years, and Jesse grew up with little knowledge of his M?tis-Cree heritage.

    "We knew we were 'Indian' and my brother remembers living in a tipi one summer in Saskatchewan," Jesse says, "but he went around and told all the kids that, and I gotta tell you, there's no faster way to get beat up in grade school in Canada than looking native and telling white kids that you lived in a tipi."

    Jerry, Jesse and Josh in Cape Breton, 1980
    image captionJerry, Jesse and Josh in Cape Breton, 1980
    Other families in the neighbourhood were reluctant to let their children play with the brothers, and at some stage Jesse decided that it would make his life easier if he pretended to be Italian.

    "I was denying who I was," he says. "I started to hate my heritage, hate myself and hate her [my mom] because she wasn't around. I felt like she had ditched us."

    At school Jesse was always fighting, was held back because of his poor grades, and never learned how to read or do maths properly. Then he joined a gang in high school and really started getting into trouble.

    "We were drinking, partying, going to raves and using drugs, and that soon became my identity," Jesse says. "I would lose myself on MDMA, ketamine and crystal meth for three, four and five days in a row."

    And then his grandparents kicked him out.

    One evening after becoming locked out of his brother Jerry's apartment in Toronto, Jesse fell three-and-a-half storeys to the ground while trying to break in. He survived and landed on his feet, but his right heel was shattered, his right ankle joint destroyed and both his wrists broken. Doctors couldn't believe that Jesse hadn't been killed. But his real problems began after he was discharged from hospital, when infection set in.

    Jesse was smoking crack to dull the pain in his leg, but when his toes started turning black and his toenails began falling off he realised he needed help.

    "My leg had rotten flesh, it was starting to go necrotic and it was gangrenous," he says.

    He vaguely remembers doctors telling him that his leg may have to be amputated, and that if the infection spread to his heart or brain it could kill him. In panic, Jesse fled.

    "I wanted to hide from the world and from my addictions, from all the mistakes and all the people that I'd hurt along the way. I just wanted to rot away and die," he says.

    "I thought, 'Why don't I do a crime and go to jail? I'll be safe in there, have a place to rest, access to food and medication.'"

    So he held up a convenience store and helped himself to the takings - but instead of waiting to be arrested, as he'd planned, he jumped into a large rubbish bin at the back of the shop and hid.

    "I was in the garbage bin, thinking, 'I can't even rob a store properly,'" Jesse says.

    He later discovered he'd taken less than $40 (Canadian dollars), and after a few weeks of drug-aggravated paranoia - imagining that he was about to be arrested at any minute - he turned himself in.

    "I did it," he told the police, "I'm the guy who robbed the store. Now lock me up and throw away the key."

    Short presentational grey line
    Prison was an unlikely turning point for Jesse.

    He received the medical help he so urgently needed for his leg, which quickly began to improve.

    But there was no support to come off the drugs and alcohol he'd been addicted to since he was a teenager, and he went through a "horrible, horrible" withdrawal, involving agonising seizures in solitary confinement.

    Surprisingly, the experience spurred him to resume his education.

    "To fight the cravings from crack I started re-teaching myself how to read and write properly," he says.

    After his release from prison, Jesse went into rehab to continue this work, while also dealing with his addictions.

    "I'd stay up late every night looking over encyclopaedias and my grades started topping the charts. I took etiquette courses to re-teach me how to eat at a table and take care of my hygiene - all the things that I'd forgotten because I'd been drifting around so long. I felt good about myself for the first time in many, many years."

    It wasn't plain sailing. He relapsed at one point, returning to the streets to beg - and take money from the Parliament Hill fountain - only managing to get back on track after he was sentenced to a one-year stint back at the same rehabilitation centre.

    While there he received a strange email - a woman was looking for him, it said, and there was a number to call. It turned out to be his mother, whom he'd seen on only a handful of occasions since she'd let Jesse and his brothers go with their father to Toronto as small children.

    Shaking and through tears, Jesse called Blanche but was so overwhelmed that he had to hang up several times while they were talking.

    "I was just terrified of being rejected and terrified of love," he says. "But it was a beautiful conversation - it was like a rain quenching the prairies after a long drought, that's what it felt like."

    Then more unexpected family news came, a message from his grandmother - the first contact he'd had with her since being banished from his grandparents' home years previously.

    She was dying, she said, and asked Jesse to visit her.

    "She gave me a tongue-lashing," Jesse says. "She was like, 'I'm really disappointed in you. I want you to make me a promise - follow through with this education, go to university, and go as far as you can.'"

    Jesse swore that he'd do as his grandmother asked. He urged her to get better and they hugged before Jesse returned to rehab. Two weeks later she died.

    Short presentational grey line
    The day after his grandmother's death, Jesse received a message of condolence from an old school friend of one of his brothers.

    "I think I fell in love with Lucie at that moment just because she was kind," Jesse says. "I light up thinking about it even now."

    Jesse and Lucie started talking often, sometimes for hours at a time on the phone, and they'd Skype one another regularly.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5,060
    Rep Power
    0
    https://www.arklatexhomepage.com/ent...ation-outfits/


    . NEXSTAR) — Michelle Obama tweeted kudos Monday to a preschool-aged pair of imitators who dressed up in an impressive recreation of the Obamas’ inauguration outfits.

    “Ryleigh & Zayden, you nailed it!” Obama said.

    The pint-sized pair, Ryleigh Madison, 3, and Zayden Lowe, 4, donned a replica of the attire worn by the former first lady and her hubby, former President Barack Obama. The kids’ Instagram photos have garnered more than 14,700 likes.



    “It’s an honor to have Michelle Obama post their pictures because she is someone worthy of Ryleigh looking up to and we believe representation matters to children,” said Zoe Hampton, Ryleigh’s aunt.

    Michelle Obama turned heads during President Joe Biden’s inauguration on Jan. 20 in a wine-colored monochrome outfit featuring an ensemble of wide-legged pants, coat and top designed by 36-year-old Black designer Sergio Hudson. She finished the look with a gold accent belt. Barack Obama wore a dark suit and overcoat.


    “It had been a while since Michelle Obama had been in the public eye, so when we saw her and her outfit we literally gasped,” said Hampton. “My mother, who had just done a Kamala Harris and Prince photoshoot for Ryleigh, thought this would be an amazing idea.”


    Hampton said the pictures of Ryleigh and Zayden were snapped with an iPhone in front of a library.

    “Ryleigh loves to dress up and take pictures, so this was fun for them both to do,” she said.

    Meredith Koop, Michelle Obama’s stylist, shared design details of the former first lady’s inauguration look on Instagram.

    “What I want to convey most, though, is that this particular outfit is about the woman wearing it more than anything. It is about her and what she means to you and to America,” Koop wrote. “She is powerful and she needs to move. She is stunning and she represents what is possible.”

    Vice President Kamala Harris’ inauguration evening dress was also designed by Hudson.

  8. #8
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    23,349
    Rep Power
    21474869
    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/good-...out&li=BBnb7Kz

    Kansas mom gets 'incredible' response for foam coolers to shelter animals in winter


    In December, Stephanie Lindquist-Johnson of Roeland Park, Kan., placed a post on Nextdoor, a neighborhood social media site, seeking unwanted foam coolers, the type often used to ship steaks or holiday hams.

    "The response was incredible," said Lindquist-Johnson, 43, a web designer for Waddell & Reed, an asset management company in Overland Park. People from around northeast Johnson County were soon dropping off coolers at her house.

    Then, with her son's help, Lindquist-Johnson turns them into shelters for feral cats - or "anything with four paws."

    "I feel so sorry for all the animals out there. It's been so cold," Lindquist-Johnson said.

    Phillip Johnson, a soon-to-be 6-year-old, is a kindergartener at St. Agnes Catholic School who loves animals. She and her son volunteer at Another Chance Cat Rescue in Waldo.

    "He's dying to go back to the cat rescue and help," Lindquist-Johnson said.

    To make the shelters, Lindquist-Johnson glues the pieces of the coolers together and cuts out portholes. After the glue dries, the coolers are tightly covered in heavy-duty, plastic black trash bags secured with duct tape. The house is then stuffed with straw or hay. The whole process takes about an hour per house.

    "I'm kind of addicted to making them and we're having fun with it," she said. "I'll keep making them as long as I don't go into terrible debt."

    A couple of people who read the Next Door posts have donated cash to the cause. "One person donated $40 and another $50," Lindquist-Johnson said.

    After creating 33 feral cat houses, Lindquist-Johnson posted a photo of her and her son on Nextdoor and offered them for free. Nearly all of the shelters have been donated back to people in the community who will use them for cats, raccoons and even opossums.

    There were many positive comments from neighbors about her efforts, including one from Natosha Halling of Upper Fairway, who commented, "Stephanie = A cat's best friend!"

    Jose Ramirez of Crestview wrote: "Atta girl!!! Great and wonderful contribution to nature. You have a good heart. The world needs more like you. You are wonderful and kind."

    Lindquist-Johnson hopes people will continue donating their foam coolers, which aren't picked up by curbside recycling.

    Jennifer Franken of Roeland Park commented, "Love this! Love that animals are being helped and the landfills aren't being filled with Styrofoam!"

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5,060
    Rep Power
    0
    https://ktla.com/news/nationworld/af...hance-at-life/

    Here is a good one

    Almost six months after a rare face and hands transplant, Joe DiMeo is relearning how to smile, blink, pinch and squeeze.

    The 22-year-old New Jersey resident had the operation last August, two years after being badly burned in a car crash.

    “I knew it would be baby steps all the way,” DiMeo told The Associated Press. “You’ve got to have a lot of motivation, a lot of patience. And you’ve got to stay strong through everything.”

    Experts say it appears the surgery at NYU Langone Health was a success, but warn it’ll take some time to say for sure.

    Worldwide, surgeons have completed at least 18 face transplants and 35 hand transplants, according to the United Network for Organ Sharing, or UNOS, which oversees the U.S. transplant system.

    But simultaneous face and double hand transplants are extremely rare and have only been tried twice before. The first attempt was in 2009 on a patient in Paris who died about a month later from complications. Two years later, Boston doctors tried it again on a woman who was mauled by a chimpanzee, but ultimately had to remove the transplanted hands days later.

    “The fact they could pull it off is phenomenal,” said Dr. Bohdan Pomahac, a surgeon at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital who led the second such attempt. “I know firsthand it’s incredibly complicated. It’s a tremendous success.”

    DiMeo will be on lifelong medications to avoid rejecting the transplants, as well as continued rehabilitation to gain sensation and function in his new face and hands.

    In 2018, DiMeo fell asleep at the wheel, he said, after working a night shift as a product tester for a drug company. The car hit a curb and utility pole, flipped over, and burst into flames. Another driver who saw the accident pulled over to rescue DiMeo.

    Afterward, he spent months in a medically induced coma and underwent 20 reconstructive surgeries and multiple skin grafts to treat his extensive third-degree burns.

    Once it became clear conventional surgeries could not help him regain full vision or use of his hands, DiMeo’s medical team began preparing for the risky transplant in early 2019.

    “Within the world of transplantation, they’re probably the most unusual,” said Dr. David Klassen, UNOS chief medical officer.

    Almost immediately, the NYU team encountered challenges including finding a donor.

    Doctors estimated he only had a 6% chance of finding a match compatible with his immune system. They also wanted to find someone with the same gender, skin tone and hand dominance.

    Then during the search for a donor, the pandemic hit and organ donations plummeted. During New York City’s surge, members of the transplant unit were reassigned to work in COVID-19 wards.

    In early August, the team finally identified a donor in Delaware and completed the 23-hour procedure a few days later.

    They amputated both of DiMeo’s hands, replacing them mid-forearm and connecting nerves, blood vessels and 21 tendons with hair-thin sutures. They also transplanted a full face, including the forehead, eyebrows, nose, eyelids, lips, both ears and underlying facial bones.

    “The possibility of us being successful based on the track record looked slim,” said Dr. Eduardo Rodriguez, who led the medical team of more than 140 people. “It’s not that someone has done this many times before and we have a kind of a schedule, a recipe to follow.”

    So far, DiMeo has not shown any signs of rejecting his new face or hands, said Rodriguez, who revealed details of the transplant Wednesday.

    Since leaving the hospital in November, DiMeo has been in intensive rehabilitation, devoting hours daily to physical, occupational and speech therapy.

    “Rehab was pretty intense,” DiMeo said, and involves a lot of “retraining yourself to do stuff on your own again.”

    During a recent session, he practiced raising his eyebrows, opening and closing his eyes, puckering his mouth, giving a thumbs up and whistling. DiMeo can feel his new forehead and hands get cold, and often reaches up to push his long hair off of his face.

    DiMeo, who lives with his parents, can now dress and feed himself. He shoots pool and plays with his dog Buster. Once an avid gym-goer, DiMeo is also working out again — benching 50 pounds and practicing his golf swing.

    “You got a new chance at life. You really can’t give up,” he said.

    As with any transplant, the danger of rejection is highest early on, but lasts indefinitely. The medications he takes also leave him vulnerable, for the rest of his life, to infections.

    “You’re never free from that risk,” Klassen said. “Transplantation for any patient is a process that plays out over a long period of time.”

    Still, Rodriguez said he’s amazed to see that DiMeo has been able to master skills like zipping up his jacket and putting on his shoes.

    “It’s very gratifying to all of us,” Rodriguez said. “There’s a tremendous sense of pride.”

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5,060
    Rep Power
    0
    https://ktla.com/news/california/76-...r-did-in-1918/

    She’s 76 years old but nurse practitioner Sigrid Stokes is in no mood to retire.

    Stokes is too busy working to save lives during a deadly pandemic, just as her mother did more than a century ago.

    While the late Kristine Berg Mueller tended to those stricken by the deadly flu pandemic that swept around the world in 1918, Stokes is giving vaccinations to health care workers battling the coronavirus.

    Mueller was a 14-year-old student in her native Norway when the flu pandemic hit. It eventually killed an estimated 50 million people, including some 675,000 in the United States, according to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention.

    “And so she and a friend volunteered at the local hospital to help out in whatever way they could, which I would imagine would be things like feeding people, bathing people, you know, changing beds, whatever they could do,” Stokes said recently as she prepared to administer vaccines at Salinas Valley Memorial Hospital near her Northern California home.

    Decades after the flu pandemic passed, Stokes’ mother would tell her that was what had inspired her to become a nurse.

    The family had no money to send her to nursing school, however, but an aunt in San Francisco agreed to take her in. She moved to the United States in 1923 and enrolled in a U.S. nursing program four years later.

    Eventually she married and moved to Los Angeles, where Stokes’ father ran a rental bookstore while her mother continued her nursing career.

    Among her assignments was being called to movie studios from time to time to make sure child actors stayed safe and healthy while on set. Among the many photos of her mother, Stokes has one that she displays proudly of her in her uniform talking to child star Shirley Temple as both smile broadly.

    It’s that same sense of joy at helping people that Stokes, her white hair framed by purple-tinted bangs and black-framed glasses, brings to her own work. She’s all business though when administering vaccines.

    “I give very good shots, I might add, good jabs,” she says with a slight smile.

    She proves it when, wearing a surgical mask, she deftly plunges a needle into the arm of a masked health care worker who doesn’t even flinch.

    It wasn’t until her late 20s that Stokes decided she wanted to follow her mother into nursing.

    “I was volunteering in the pediatric ward and so on and I all of a sudden realized, you know, I really like this,” she recalled.

    Stokes who was still working part-time when the coronavirus began to sweep the country early last year. She was too old to safely treat COVID-19 patients, but knew she could help with vaccinations.

    As she arrives at work each day from her home in Pacific Grove she wears the enamel earrings she fashioned from a Norwegian necklace that her mother proudly wore each day before her death at age 91 in 1995.

    “I wear them every time I come to work because I feel like it’s a sort of a talisman that she’s with me and our family, we’re doing it” said Stokes, who also still has the black cape her mother wore for years over her white nurse’s uniform.

    With COVID-19 having killed more than 2 million people worldwide, including more than 450,000 in the United States, Stokes isn’t ready to quit until this virus has been tamed.

    “We’ve got to get this done,” she said. “We’ve got to get people vaccinated so we can get this country moving again.”

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5,060
    Rep Power
    0
    https://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/2021/0...-returns-home/

    BEAUMONT, Calif. (KCAL/KCBS) – Eight-year-old Anthony Rodriguez Jr. recently got a warm welcome home after fighting for his life in the ICU.

    He had been in Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital fighting against a rare illness associated with COVID-19 called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, or MIS-C.

    His father Anthony Rodriguez said the entire family had COVID-19 in early December, but that they had mild symptoms and recovered.

    But about five weeks later, his son suddenly came down with a fever.

    “He started having bloodshot eyes, cracked lips, a little bit of vomiting,” Rodriguez said.

    After about a week when they thought Anthony was getting better, Rodriguez’s wife happened to come across the symptoms of MIS-C.

    “She read about MIS-C. We had this bad feeling – even though he was getting better – we had this bad feeling and rushed him to the hospital,” Rodriguez said. “They did tell us he was suffering from septic shock and he was having heart failure.”

    His parents said Anthony has no underlying conditions.

    He went through days of different treatments at the hospital until one finally worked.

    Doctors say even the symptoms can vary in this rare inflammatory condition.

    North Hollywood pediatrician Dr. Joel Warsh, who wasn’t involved in treating Anthony, said parents have called him very worried about what to look for.

    “We’re seeing fever that lasts for several days. Vomiting, diarrhea, stomachaches, skin rashes, feeling tired, fast heartbeat, red eyes, swelling,” Warsh said.

    He said it’s still unclear why some kids get the illness and others don’t.

    Rodriguez said he believes sharing his story could help save a child suffering from MIS-C.

    Anthony is expected to make a full recovery. There have been about 40 reported cases of MIS-C at Loma Linda University Children’s Hospital.

  12. #12
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    23,349
    Rep Power
    21474869
    https://www.cnn.com/2021/02/26/us/pr...rnd/index.html

    A middle schooler was insecure about his haircut. So his principal fixed it himself instead of disciplining the boy for wearing a hat

    We've all had at least one bad haircut in our lifetimes, and chances are, we remember how that bad haircut made us feel.

    Jason Smith, the middle school principal at Stonybrook Intermediate and Middle School in Indianapolis, Indiana, understood that feeling. And that's why it was a no-brainer to jump into action for one of his students, Anthony Moore.

    Moore was wearing a hat, which is against the school's dress code. After the student spoke with a school dean for about 30 minutes, Smith was asked to step in.

    "I sat across from him and asked, 'What's wrong? Why are you being defiant, why are you refusing to take your hat off? It's a pretty simple request,'" Smith said. "And he explained that his parents took him to get a haircut and he didn't like the results."

    Smith said he and the dean thought his hair looked fine. "But you know he's a 13 [or] 14-year-old kid, and we know social acceptance is more important than adult acceptance," he said.

    "I told him, 'Look, I've been cutting hair since I was your age,' and I showed him pictures of my son's haircuts that I did and some of me cutting hair in college. And I said, 'If I run home and get my clippers and fix your line, will you go back to class?'" Smith said. "He hesitated but then he said yes."

    So in the snow, Smith drove back home to get his clippers and brought them to his office to line Moore's head up while his parents were called for consent to touch up his hair.

    Tawanda Johnson, Moore's mom, said she thought the gesture was wonderful.

    "He (Smith) handled it very well to keep him from getting in trouble at school," she said. "I'm just glad that he was able to handle that without ... being put in in-school suspension."

    "He didn't say straight out, but I feel like he didn't want to be laughed at," Smith said. "The barbershop and hair cuts as Black males is very important in the community and looking your best and being sharp -- it's just a cultural aspect."

    "Just from my being a Black male myself and coming through that culture and you know, I really think girls matter at that age, which [means] appearance then could matter. He was scared he was going to be laughed at and we were pretty sure no one would notice, but he was looking through his lens," Smith said.

    Smith made sure to check on Moore throughout the day, and found that he was learning and didn't have his hat on after the touch-up.

    "All behavior is communication and when a student is struggling, we need to ask ourselves what happened to this child instead of what's wrong with the child," Smith said. "What need is the child trying to get met and really, the future of urban education rests on that question."

    Smith said the consequence for not abiding by the dress code ordinarily would have been in-school suspension or being picked up by a parent, which, Smith said, "would have prevented him from being in front of a classroom teacher and giving him the education he deserves, so it really worked out well."

  13. #13
    Cousin Greg Angiebla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    13,822
    Rep Power
    21474859
    What a nice gesture from the principal.

    "The love for all living creatures is the most noble attribute of man" -Charles Darwin

    Quote Originally Posted by bowieluva View Post
    Chelsea, if you are a ghost and reading mds, I command you to walk into the light.

  14. #14
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    23,349
    Rep Power
    21474869
    https://www.insideedition.com/dog-st...-seizure-65775

    Dog Stops Traffic to Get Help for Owner Having a Seizure

    Surveillance video shows a dog stopping an oncoming vehicle to get help for its owner, who collapsed in the street while having a seizure.

    A quick-thinking pup saved her owner’s life in an incredible way. When Haley Moore collapsed while having a seizure, her dog, Clover, tried to wake her up as she lay on the ground unresponsive, surveillance video shows.

    Then something remarkable happened: a car zips by and seemed to give Clover an idea. She ran into the middle of the street to halt traffic. Sure enough, the oncoming vehicle came to a halt.

    “It was really impressive. The dog Clover actually blocked my way. She kind of backed into the road to block the truck,” the driver, Dryden Oatway, told Inside Edition.

    Oatway came out to help.

    “All I remember is waking up in the ambulance and being very confused,” Moore told Inside Edition.

    "I’m very grateful for her saving my life,” she added.
    good dog!

  15. #15
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    23,349
    Rep Power
    21474869
    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...lized-n1263144

    Restaurant offers man a job instead of pressing charges after business vandalized-The owner of Diablo's Southwest Grill in Augusta, Georgia, said he wants to "give the … would-be robber some redemption and a different path.”

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5,060
    Rep Power
    0
    https://kstp.com/national/insurer-to...rce=zetaglobal

    Its one of these where you can be partially feel good but the person is still damaged from brutality

    An insurance company for the City of Cedar Rapids will pay $8 million to a Black motorist who was paralyzed after a white police officer shot him during a 2016 traffic stop, both sides announced Monday.

    The payout will settle a long-running lawsuit brought by Jerime Mitchell, 42, over a shooting that had exposed tensions between Black residents and authorities in Iowa’s second-largest city.

    The resolution avoids a trial that had been scheduled to begin Tuesday, as the nation awaits a verdict in the trial of a former Minneapolis police officer charged with killing George Floyd.

    The payment is expected to be the most expensive settlement over allegations of excessive force by police in Iowa’s history.

    The city had spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees defending against the lawsuit and arguing that Officer Lucas Jones acted lawfully in shooting Mitchell. A city spokeswoman said in a statement that it was fully prepared for trial but its insurer, States Insurance, had control over whether to settle under its policy and “determined settlement to be in the best interests of its insured, the city."

    The city said that it admitted no wrongdoing as part of the settlement and that its review determined Jones “acted properly” given the facts and circumstances of the stop.

    “The case has been divisive to our community and it is our hope that we can continue to enhance relationships that build trust between our community and our police department,” said the statement, issued by spokeswoman Maria Johnson. “We all share the desire for a safe community.”

    An attorney for Mitchell and his wife said the settlement will help pay for Mitchell's future health care needs but he said the “most significant result” was helping spur the firing of Jones as an officer.

    “Deadly force was not justified here,” said the attorney, Larry Powers of Chicago.

    Mitchell had attended rallies in his wheelchair last summer in the wake of Floyd's death opposing police brutality and racial injustice. Activists then renewed their calls for the firing of Jones, who remained on the force and had fatally shot an armed white suspect a year before shooting Mitchell in the neck.

    The Cedar Rapids Police Department fired Jones last June, but not for either shooting. Instead, the department said that Jones was fired for his handling of a traffic stop the day before shooting Mitchell in which he let a young Black mother go instead of arresting her for driving while suspended, as required by policy.

    The city opened an investigation into that stop after Jones testified in a 2020 deposition during the Mitchell case that he turned off his body microphone “because I was violating a policy.”

    Jones pulled over Mitchell early on Nov. 1, 2016, near Coe College, claiming Mitchell’s license plate light was not working.

    Police have said Jones asked Mitchell to get out of the vehicle after smelling marijuana. Mitchell resisted being handcuffed and Jones pushed him against the truck and took him to the ground. Mitchell got up with the officer on his back and a police dog engaging him, and got in his truck and begin to drive away.

    As he clung to the moving truck, Jones fired three times, with one bullet striking Mitchell in the neck. Authorities have said Mitchell was immediately paralyzed and unable to control the vehicle as it accelerated to 60 mph (97 kph) and smashed into an oncoming police SUV driven by the city's deputy police chief, who was responding to Jones' call for backup and suffered only minor injuries.

    A grand jury declined to charge Jones, and authorities argued he shot in self-defense.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    5,060
    Rep Power
    0
    https://abcnews.go.com/US/california...ry?id=77191841

    I call this a 50/50 on this one and its mixed
    Nice that the family got their land back

    A stretch of beachfront land in Southern California that was seized from a Black family 97 years ago is set to be returned to their descendants.

    Black couple Willa and Charles Bruce purchased land on Manhattan Beach in 1912, making them among the first Black landowners in the city. But 12 years later they were forced off their property as it was seized by the city.

    On Tuesday, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted 5-0 to return the property to the descendants of Willa and Charles Bruce.

    The Bruces bought the first of two ocean-view lots for $1,225, a property that could now be worth millions.
    They built a resort known as Bruce's Beach to serve Black residents, making it one of the few beaches Black residents could use due to segregation. The Bruces and their customers were harassed and threatened by their white neighbors, including the Ku Klux Klan, the county board of supervisors said in a news release.

    In 1924, the city of Manhattan Beach used eminent domain to force the couple off their land to turn it into a park. The city seized the property in 1929, however, it remained vacant for decades.

    MORE: How Black Lives Matter became a multicultural awakening
    Following Tuesday's vote, the Los Angeles County Chief Executive Office will file a report within 60 days with a plan and timeline to return the property to the Bruce family.

    The Los Angeles County Lifeguard Training Headquarters is currently located on the land. The county will have to address plans for the county to either lease the property from the Bruce family or relocate the lifeguard facility.
    The council also voted to sponsor Senate Bill 796, which was introduced last week, and is necessary to transfer the property. When the property was transferred from the state to the county in 1995, it restricted the county's ability to transfer the property. This legislation would lift the restrictions and allows the county to hand over the property to the Bruce family. There is a hearing set for the bill April 27.

    "This was an injustice inflicted upon not just Willa and Charles Bruce, but generations of their descendants who almost certainly would have been millionaires if they had been able to keep this property and their successful business," Los Angeles County District 4 Supervisor Janice Hahn said. Hahn's district includes the Manhattan Beach property to be returned to the family.

    "When I realized that the county now had ownership of the Bruce's original property, I felt there was nothing else to do but give the property back to the direct descendants of Willa and Charles Bruce," she added.


    "I hope that other cities, other counties, and other states will see what we are doing here," Hahn said after the vote. "And I hope that they will be inspired to look at their own histories and identify opportunities to begin to repair and make amends for injustices like these."

    Anthony Bruce is one of the family's last living direct descendants and said his family was robbed by the land seizure.

    "It was a wrong against the Bruce family," Anthony Bruce told Los Angeles ABC station KABC. "I think we would be wealthy Americans still living there in California ... Manhattan Beach probably."

    "I want people to take away from this that there is justice and that you have to pursue it and your family can find peace for some of the wrongs that were committed against them in the past," he added.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    GA girl living in NY
    Posts
    4,052
    Rep Power
    21474854

    Sometimes I just need a pick me up to start my day


  19. #19
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    23,349
    Rep Power
    21474869
    I"m not crying, you are.

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    GA girl living in NY
    Posts
    4,052
    Rep Power
    21474854

  21. #21
    Scoopski Potatoes Nic B's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Sacramento, California
    Posts
    11,445
    Rep Power
    21474859
    Aw man, that hit all the feels.

    Edited: I meant to quote the cop's son video.


    Quote Originally Posted by marakisses View Post
    yes i said i will leave it under you storage he said cuddle with me i said shut up it over??? what am i doing wrong??
    Quote Originally Posted by curiouscat View Post
    Happy Birthday! I hid a dead body in your backyard to celebrate. Good luck finding it under the cement. You can only use a stick to look for it.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    GA girl living in NY
    Posts
    4,052
    Rep Power
    21474854
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    Aw man, that hit all the feels.

    Edited: I meant to quote the cop's son video.
    I knew which one. I'm still crying but it is a happy one.

  23. #23
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    23,349
    Rep Power
    21474869
    https://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/...anera-77241041

    Miami women surprise homeless teen with magical quinceanera-More than 50 fairy godmothers came together to create a magical quinceanera party for a homeless Miami teen

    Entering her magical quinceanera on by her father’s arm, her tiara sparkling and her fuchsia ballgown trimmed with ruffles to perfectly match her cake, Adriana Palma scanned the crowd for familiar faces.

    Most of the guests were strangers. But they would soon become like family — without them, this Parisian pink fairy tale of a 15th birthday party would never have come to life.

    At least one very important person was missing — Adriana’s grandmother, who according to custom would have imparted wisdom and a special gift. She remained in Mexico.

    “Don’t worry,” a volunteer at the homeless shelter told Adriana before the February celebration. “Today, we are all your godmothers.”

    When the teen left Mexico in early 2020, she looked forward to a new life in Miami with her parents and three younger brothers. But when the pandemic hit, her father’s job disappeared.

    Alone and impoverished, they spent four months living in their SUV. Adriana and her brothers — hungry and unfamiliar with English — crammed in homework assignments whenever they could find WiFi.

    The Miami Rescue Mission had been inundated with housing requests after the pandemic, but in June they found a small apartment for the Palmas. The family slowly adapted to new routines.

    But Adriana’s 15th birthday was coming, a day she had dreamt of since she was a little girl. Quinceaneras are revered in Hispanic culture and celebrated with all the gusto of a wedding. But after her father lost his job, Adriana said, “I lost all hope of having one.”

    Itzel Palma tried to console her daughter.

    “We will be together as a family,” she told her. “That will be my gift to you.”

    Lian Navarro, a community development associate at Miami Rescue Mission, asks caseworkers every month for the names of children celebrating a birthday at the shelter. Her nearly 60 volunteer “Cover Girls,” named after the protective covering of an umbrella, bring cupcakes, balloons and small toys to ensure children aren’t overlooked.

    When Navarro, a Cuban American, heard of Adriana’s upcoming 15th birthday, she knew the importance of the occasion. And she resolved to make the quinceanera happen.

    Elle Montero and Tadia Silva, Miami real estate agents and longtime Cover Girls, were used to pulling off events with scarce resources. But as they scanned the bare room of a Miami church filled with nothing but a tree and a few tables, they thought: This is impossible.

    Then they set out to do the impossible.

    They’d already settled on a Parisian theme, something feminine and floral, and remembered some vintage trunks with big brass buckles that Silva had in storage. They found small gold Eiffel towers, placed cupcakes in delicate floral teacups, filled elegant glass jars with pastel macarons and sweet madeleines, and finished each table with pink floral centerpieces.

    Nearly 50 Cover Girls joined in. Some gave money, others donated food or services. A makeup artist gave Adriana her very first makeup lesson, a hair stylist put her glossy, dark locks in soft curls and a professional photographer spent three hours capturing the event.

    “We want them to have these memories. They have to believe they are worth all that because they are,” said Silva. “Some people don’t excel because they think they can’t do better because they’ve been conditioned that this is their fate, but little by little they get back on their feet.”

    The Cover Girls stacked Adriana’s table with everything on her wish list, bracelets and purses, pajamas and gift cards, laughing like proud aunties as she peeled off the wrapping paper.

    She danced with her father, swaying under the palm trees to Ed Sheeran’s “Photograph” as many of her new godmothers wept with joy.

    As the party was about to end, Adriana tucked handwritten notes into each hand; in her halting English, she thanked her godmothers for the magical memories.

    “I felt like a princess,” she said.

  24. #24
    What do you care? Boston Babe 73's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Under your bed
    Posts
    21,323
    Rep Power
    21474866
    Quote Originally Posted by up2trouble View Post
    That got me crying for sure....
    Quote Originally Posted by Miller22 View Post
    I thought the exact same thing. Poor Brennen Tammons.
    Oh well, back to gum.
    ....or exchanging Puke's wang for spicy nuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nic B View Post
    That is too pretty to be shoved up an ass.

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    GA girl living in NY
    Posts
    4,052
    Rep Power
    21474854
    https://twitter.com/i/status/1386514713949917185

    This was my laugh for the morning. I'm a lot less than 74 and I can't move like Glenn Close!
    Last edited by up2trouble; 04-26-2021 at 06:55 AM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •